4li2k73z Share your Vital activity on Facebook (More info)
close

Post Production

2/8/2013 6:06 PM

I feel like the Photo/Video forum could use a thread on post production techniques. Please feel free to post any information you might find fitting, whether it's compression settings, a problem your having with your software, or a editing certain technique that you can't quite figure out. I'll do my best to moderate and add any knowledge I might have on the given topics. Lets get this thread going!!

2/8/2013 7:34 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/11/2013 10:10 AM

I personally struggled for years to slow down footage in Final Cut, Premiere Pro, or whatever editing software I was using. The technique is very time consuming and doesn't leave you with the best results. Eventually I got After Effects and started doing it the right way. Here is a really simple tutorial I found online that explains the process.
http://blip.tv/ezkemo/how-to-time-remap-on-after-effects-1021104

2/13/2013 5:03 PM

Post Production tip of the day - If you have a clip with a ton of applause at the end, fade the audio from the end of that clip into the beginning of the next clip. This way you can still cut quickly while still hearing the applause, and you wont get that awkward sound of applause being cut out completely as the edit plays into the next clip.

2/13/2013 6:34 PM

zachkrejmas wrote: Post Production tip of the day - If you have a clip with a ton of applause at the end, fade the audio from the end of that clip into the beginning of the next clip. This way you can still cut quickly while still hearing the applause, and you wont get that awkward sound of applause being cut out completely as the edit plays into the next clip.

I was watching QSS 3 and noticed this, how weird you randomly decide to put it up

2Hi throwaway



Anti-street?

NEWER VIDEO





TRV-950 Footy






Holy shit Chad Degroot posted in my Good porn thread!


VX all day(fixed, raw video, real shit)


Refs: Stayinonmagrind, Dee hos, Kevin Burnett

2/13/2013 9:13 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/13/2013 9:14 PM

Yeah, Bob Scerbo does that a lot. Those dudes are always cruising around with a group of homies.

2/15/2013 10:24 AM

Want to make your footage pop? Something you can do to make your footage look better is some basic image correction. Most editing applications have video filters that allow you to adjust things like the brightness and contrast of your clips. If you're shooting footage in standard definition, (particularly on a Sony TRV or VX series camera), i've found that slightly over exposing the image in camera, then bringing down the brightness in post has a great effect. Obviously don't go over board, but if you're struggling to decide between two f-stops, go for the more exposed of the two, then bring the brightness down to the desired level in your editing application. This can be a great way to get in between f-stops because sometimes an aperture of 4.0 can seem over exposed, while closing up to 5.6 may seem under exposed. Again just don't go over board, the key to image and color correction is to keep it subtle.

Also, SD (standard definition) cameras don't have as much contrast as their HD counter parts. Contrast refers to the ratio between how bright or white the whites are, and how dark or black the blacks are. To much contrast will render your clip black and white. But adding just a little (level it at 3 or 5 in FCP) can help your colors gain more vibrance.

Thats all for now! Be sure to let me know if anyone has any specific questions or problems.

2/27/2013 3:51 PM

Today's post production tip revolves around capturing Sony VX1000 footage into Final Cut Pro. Because of the fact that most camcorders shoot at an audio rate of 48khz, this is the default capture preset in Final Cut. When you go to capture your VX footage you will get a warning that the audio sample rate of your sequence/capture preset doesn't match the sample rate of your tape. What you need to do is as follows. Be sure to have your camera on and plugged into your computer with a firewire cable. Go to the Final Cut Pro drop down menu and go to Audio/Video settings. From here select the Capture Presets tab, find the "DV NTSC 48 kHz" tab and select it, then click edit. Create a copy of the DV NTSC 48kHz preset and change the audio sample rate to 32kHz, title it something like "VX capture preset" so you remember it. Capture your clips!

3/1/2013 6:55 PM

zachkrejmas wrote: Today's post production tip revolves around capturing Sony VX1000 footage into Final Cut Pro. Because of the fact that most camcorders shoot at an audio rate of 48khz, this is the default capture preset in Final Cut. When you go to capture your VX footage you will get a warning that the audio sample rate of your sequence/capture preset doesn't match the sample rate of your tape. What you need to do is as follows. Be sure to have your camera on and plugged into your computer with a firewire cable. Go to the Final Cut Pro drop down menu and go to Audio/Video settings. From here select the Capture Presets tab, find the "DV NTSC 48 kHz" tab and select it, then click edit. Create a copy of the DV NTSC 48kHz preset and change the audio sample rate to 32kHz, title it something like "VX capture preset" so you remember it. Capture your clips!

Hey man, I just got a GL2 and I wanting to know the proper ways to upload it and not fuck up the heads. I'm not near new to computers/cameras haha. I'm almost done filling this tape up and then I'm editing so reply soon!

Filmer for Crux Division, TXL, DFW/OKC rider

3/2/2013 3:03 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/2/2013 3:04 PM

zachkrejmas wrote: Today's post production tip revolves around capturing Sony VX1000 footage into Final Cut Pro. Because of the fact that most camcorders shoot at an audio rate of 48khz, this is the default capture preset in Final Cut. When you go to capture your VX footage you will get a warning that the audio sample rate of your sequence/capture preset doesn't match the sample rate of your tape. What you need to do is as follows. Be sure to have your camera on and plugged into your computer with a firewire cable. Go to the Final Cut Pro drop down menu and go to Audio/Video settings. From here select the Capture Presets tab, find the "DV NTSC 48 kHz" tab and select it, then click edit. Create a copy of the DV NTSC 48kHz preset and change the audio sample rate to 32kHz, title it something like "VX capture preset" so you remember it. Capture your clips!

TXLJHOPE wrote: Hey man, I just got a GL2 and I wanting to know the proper ways to upload it and not fuck up the heads. I'm not near new to computers/cameras haha. I'm almost done filling this tape up and then I'm editing so reply soon!

Well to start, you are going to need a firewire cable to connect your camera to your computer. Depending on the port in your computer, you're going to need a 4 pin to 4 pin, 6 pin, or 9 pin. As for the heads of your camera, if you really want to save them as much damage as possible, you can buy a cheap Canon mini dv camera and use that to capture. I've never owned a GL2, but I'm pretty sure that the audio sample rate is 16 bit, 48kHz. Unless for some reason you have it in 12 bit mode, then it's 32kHz. So your capture and sequence settings should be set to reflect that.

3/2/2013 11:15 PM

zachkrejmas wrote: Today's post production tip revolves around capturing Sony VX1000 footage into Final Cut Pro. Because of the fact that most camcorders shoot at an audio rate of 48khz, this is the default capture preset in Final Cut. When you go to capture your VX footage you will get a warning that the audio sample rate of your sequence/capture preset doesn't match the sample rate of your tape. What you need to do is as follows. Be sure to have your camera on and plugged into your computer with a firewire cable. Go to the Final Cut Pro drop down menu and go to Audio/Video settings. From here select the Capture Presets tab, find the "DV NTSC 48 kHz" tab and select it, then click edit. Create a copy of the DV NTSC 48kHz preset and change the audio sample rate to 32kHz, title it something like "VX capture preset" so you remember it. Capture your clips!

TXLJHOPE wrote: Hey man, I just got a GL2 and I wanting to know the proper ways to upload it and not fuck up the heads. I'm not near new to computers/cameras haha. I'm almost done filling this tape up and then I'm editing so reply soon!

zachkrejmas wrote: Well to start, you are going to need a firewire cable to connect your camera to your computer. Depending on the port in your computer, you're going to need a 4 pin to 4 pin, 6 pin, or 9 pin. As for the heads of your camera, if you really want to save them as much damage as possible, you can buy a cheap Canon mini dv camera and use that to capture. I've never owned a GL2, but I'm pretty sure that the audio sample rate is 16 bit, 48kHz. Unless for some reason you have it in 12 bit mode, then it's 32kHz. So your capture and sequence settings should be set to reflect that.

I don't understand why these camera were made to upload but it fucks them up.... that makes no sense. Can't I just clean the heads if I capture from the camera itself? I have a firewire to USB cable if that counts?

Filmer for Crux Division, TXL, DFW/OKC rider

3/4/2013 2:32 PM

TXLJHOPE wrote: Hey man, I just got a GL2 and I wanting to know the proper ways to upload it and not fuck up the heads. I'm not near new to computers/cameras haha. I'm almost done filling this tape up and then I'm editing so reply soon!

zachkrejmas wrote: Well to start, you are going to need a firewire cable to connect your camera to your computer. Depending on the port in your computer, you're going to need a 4 pin to 4 pin, 6 pin, or 9 pin. As for the heads of your camera, if you really want to save them as much damage as possible, you can buy a cheap Canon mini dv camera and use that to capture. I've never owned a GL2, but I'm pretty sure that the audio sample rate is 16 bit, 48kHz. Unless for some reason you have it in 12 bit mode, then it's 32kHz. So your capture and sequence settings should be set to reflect that.

TXLJHOPE wrote: I don't understand why these camera were made to upload but it fucks them up.... that makes no sense. Can't I just clean the heads if I capture from the camera itself? I have a firewire to USB cable if that counts?

I wouldn't say that capturing off your camera actually fucks it up so much as it just puts more use on the heads and wears your camera out quicker. Yes, these camera's are intended to be used as capture decks for capturing the footage from your tape, but at the same time it's not like your GL2 is brand new. With the DSLR craze, mini dv camera's aren't in production anymore. So all the SD mini dv camera's out there are at least a few years old. It won't ruin your camera to capture from it, I did for years. However, if you want to prolong the life of your camera for as long as possible, then using a different camera to capture is one thing you can do.

3/10/2013 8:53 PM

I shoot DSLR footage at a very neutral picture (Contrast: 0, Sharpness: 0), follow the rule of thumb(60p/125-200th), Editing station is a 13" Macbook pro with 750GB HDD/8GB RAM/2.9 GHz/i.7 dual-core, and edit with Premiere Pro CS6 with MPEG Streamclip.

Thought I should share....

Anyways, Zack, what's a good export setting for 60p shot DSLR footage? I use Mpeg Streamclip to convert the RAW DSLR files to "Apple Pro Res 422 HQ" prior before importing it on the Premiere timeline. As it gets on the Premiere timeline, I set the sequence settings to the correct codec "Apple ProRes 422". On my Export setting, the format is "h.264" and I use the preset "YouTube HD 720p 29.97". Do you have any good tips on compression/export settings? Or is there a different method/program you use? Just curious...

3/10/2013 8:58 PM

http://youtu.be/YaHbkgFtzZs

Anyways, here's results of my export settings.

3/13/2013 2:02 PM

WildBycyclist666 wrote: I shoot DSLR footage at a very neutral picture (Contrast: 0, Sharpness: 0), follow the rule of thumb(60p/125-200th), Editing station is a 13" Macbook pro with 750GB HDD/8GB RAM/2.9 GHz/i.7 dual-core, and edit with Premiere Pro CS6 with MPEG Streamclip.

Thought I should share....

Anyways, Zack, what's a good export setting for 60p shot DSLR footage? I use Mpeg Streamclip to convert the RAW DSLR files to "Apple Pro Res 422 HQ" prior before importing it on the Premiere timeline. As it gets on the Premiere timeline, I set the sequence settings to the correct codec "Apple ProRes 422". On my Export setting, the format is "h.264" and I use the preset "YouTube HD 720p 29.97". Do you have any good tips on compression/export settings? Or is there a different method/program you use? Just curious...

Sounds like you're doing shit right man! I've been asking my friends a lot of these same questions (since I just made the switch to HD). I'd say your compression method seems to be working well for you, that footage looks crispy. In the past while working with SD footage i've realized that every player is different. What might look good on one player might look totally different on another, it's a lot of trial and error really, but i'd say you're definitely doing it right.

3/13/2013 2:15 PM

WildBycyclist666 wrote: I shoot DSLR footage at a very neutral picture (Contrast: 0, Sharpness: 0), follow the rule of thumb(60p/125-200th), Editing station is a 13" Macbook pro with 750GB HDD/8GB RAM/2.9 GHz/i.7 dual-core, and edit with Premiere Pro CS6 with MPEG Streamclip.

Thought I should share....

Anyways, Zack, what's a good export setting for 60p shot DSLR footage? I use Mpeg Streamclip to convert the RAW DSLR files to "Apple Pro Res 422 HQ" prior before importing it on the Premiere timeline. As it gets on the Premiere timeline, I set the sequence settings to the correct codec "Apple ProRes 422". On my Export setting, the format is "h.264" and I use the preset "YouTube HD 720p 29.97". Do you have any good tips on compression/export settings? Or is there a different method/program you use? Just curious...

i use compressor 4 i belive, part of the final cut seiries..it is really good

Photobucket


follow me on instagram! @neck_brace
also go like my media page on facebook! jiraffe media
also follow jiraffe media on insta! @jiraffe_media

5/13/2013 5:05 PM
Edited Date/Time: 5/23/2013 2:29 PM

Post Production tip of the day - Have you ever recorded audio (particularly someone speaking) and realized it sounds like ass due to a high level of background noise? Most professional videographers use a lapel aka clip-on mic to capture the voice of their subject while leaving out the background noise. I understand not all people are going to go buy a microphone kit just to have a little dialogue in their edit. I recently found myself shooting audio on the fly with my SLR mounted microphone, and as I expected there was a high level of background noise, making it hard to hear the rider. With a little bit of research, I came across the audio application "Audacity" which you can download for free online. With a few simple steps you can use this program to filter out that gross background noise. Watch the tutorial here and download Audacity here.

5/23/2013 2:42 PM

Post Production Tip of the Day - Using the "smooth cam" effect in Final Cut Pro

Have you ever shot a static second angle (on a tri-pod) on a windy day and later notice that the footage was slightly shaky? How about trying to shoot steady footage from a moving vehicle? I recently had to deal with a shaky static shot (due to a windy day), and I remembered a trick my friend and shown me a few years back. The trick is called the "smooth cam" effect, and if you have FInal Cut Pro you should be able to utilize this (I have version 7 but I believe FCP 5 and 6 have it as well). Basically it's a simple video filter that you place on your clip, what it does is zooms in on your piece of media about 1-5% and analyzes the way it moves and/or shakes. It takes awhile to analyze, so you might want to have the clip already cut down to what you want on the timeline. This thing does magic! I'll attach a screen grab so you can see exactly where the effect is located.

5/23/2013 9:29 PM

zachkrejmas wrote: Sounds like you're doing shit right man! I've been asking my friends a lot of these same questions (since I just made the switch to HD). I'd say your compression method seems to be working well for you, that footage looks crispy. In the past while working with SD footage i've realized that every player is different. What might look good on one player might look totally different on another, it's a lot of trial and error really, but i'd say you're definitely doing it right.

Thanks man! Great to get your opinion! I've always thought they're might be like a frame problem or a lot of other noticeable problems.

Thanks again man! Let's ride soon!

5/29/2013 4:04 PM
Edited Date/Time: 5/29/2013 4:05 PM

WildBycyclist666 wrote: Thanks man! Great to get your opinion! I've always thought they're might be like a frame problem or a lot of other noticeable problems.

Thanks again man! Let's ride soon!

Personally, I've learned through trial and error that when uploading to the Vital player, I need to export at 30fps. For some reason 60fps doesn't translate as well on our player and the motion looks a bit choppy compared to a 30fps export. I'm not sure if it's the same case on YouTube but you might want to give it a shot.

Also, not sure if people know this (I know I've made the mistake before), but it's always best to export your full quality/uncompressed sequence first, then put that file into a new sequence to re-export the compressed version. That way the original stays perfectly intact and won't become damaged if you make some irreversible sequence setting mistake.

I want to come out to the dez real soon man! I'll let you know.

5/29/2013 11:03 PM

zachkrejmas wrote: Personally, I've learned through trial and error that when uploading to the Vital player, I need to export at 30fps. For some reason 60fps doesn't translate as well on our player and the motion looks a bit choppy compared to a 30fps export. I'm not sure if it's the same case on YouTube but you might want to give it a shot.

Also, not sure if people know this (I know I've made the mistake before), but it's always best to export your full quality/uncompressed sequence first, then put that file into a new sequence to re-export the compressed version. That way the original stays perfectly intact and won't become damaged if you make some irreversible sequence setting mistake.

I want to come out to the dez real soon man! I'll let you know.

Ohhhhh okay I see. Thank you main man Krejmas!

By the way, new edit dropping June 6th!

5/30/2013 10:30 AM

WildBycyclist666 wrote: Ohhhhh okay I see. Thank you main man Krejmas!

By the way, new edit dropping June 6th!

Dope! I actually have a new edit dropping within a week or so too... High Desert represent!

6/1/2013 10:40 AM

zachkrejmas wrote: Dope! I actually have a new edit dropping within a week or so too... High Desert represent!

Yeaahhhhhh Boy!

6/5/2013 7:59 PM

just wondering what video making software you guys use to edit videos. I find an imovie pf pc ShowBiz allows to add great effects to live up videos and the editing works seems easy.

6/11/2013 1:36 PM

sugarsugar wrote: just wondering what video making software you guys use to edit videos. I find an imovie pf pc ShowBiz allows to add great effects to live up videos and the editing works seems easy.

I personally use Final Cut Pro 7, but there are so many options out there. Adobe premiere is good, Avid is a bit older and harder to work with in my opinion, but it is the standard in Hollywood. Imovie is definitely fine to start with, you really don't need a ton of crazy effects to make a good edit. I had some pretty ancient software until a few years ago.

11/13/2013 1:23 PM

Sharpening

As a videographer, you've likely had the day come where you film an amazing clip of your homie, only to get home and realize that your focus was slightly soft. (Since you should be using manual focus!).

Sometimes the clip is simply too out of focus, and you have to break to news to the rider that they may need to re-film that clip. However, depending on the severity of the focus error, this is something that can be fixed in POST PRODUCTION!!!

Head into your video effects tab, then find the "Sharpen" tool. In FCP 7, it's located here...


Use the Sharpen Video Filter / Fx Plug and place it on the clip that's giving you trouble. FCP has a default setting of 100% amount of sharpening, and this is simply way too much. Go into the effect controls and adjust the amount down to .1 or so, and viola, your footage is crispy....


Please feel free to post in this thread with any and all post production questions you guys might have.

Post a Reply to: Post Production

To post, please join, log in or connect to Vital using your Facebook profile Fb_connect_sm