Bob Haro recently teamed up with Nike 6.0 and the Athlete Recovery Fund to design a super-limited-edition shoe and help raise fund for the Athlete Recovery Fund cause. Check out the interview, and click here to see the dope numberplate artwork.

From Nike 6.0:
Nike 6.0 collaborated with BMX Hall-of-Famer, Bob Haro, creating a Mavrk Mid inspired by the Lightning Bolts Art Exhibit, based off of Haro’s iconic number plate. Over 40 artists with a cultural connection to BMX contributed to Lightning Bolts, sharing their message of speed, youth, and BMX. All original artwork is currently being auctioned off online, with all proceeds benefiting Athlete Recovery Fund. Auction ends Monday Dec. 15th-Wed. 17th.

The Nike 6.0 Bob Haro Mavrk Mid is available in select sizes via auction at: www.athleterecoveryfund.com/lightningbolts/ ending Weds. Dec. 17th.

What do the illustrations on the shoe represent?
The illustrations on the shoe are from back in the day when I was the staff artist at Bicycle Motocross Action magazine. Each month the publisher gave me a full page to come up with anything I wanted to. Full artistic license. I came up with a story about a couple of riders and the riding escapades they got into – all BMX related of course.

What’s the story behind the color ways?
My shoe design is a combination of artwork I drew and the Haro team colors I rode with back in the day. Dark blue, light blue and white were my color story. Back then the ‘80’s look was in – oh yeah, it was the ‘80’s…

How and when did you start illustrating for the BMX community?
I’ve done illustration and cartooning my whole life but things really got started in BMX as a teenager in the late 70’s. I submitted my work to BMX Weekly a news print type magazine back then and they liked my work and things took off from there. Things also kind of snowballed from there as the more my work was published the more work came to me. It was really fun and exciting time for me.




What is the significance of Lightning bolts to you?
The lightning bolt theme was popular in motocross back then. MX riders like Bob Hannah had them on their helmets and I thought they looked cool so I borrowed them for my number plates. The Lightning Bolt Art Show is very humbling to me, as I could have never imagined that something I designed as a kid would be relevant yet alone iconic today. I’m flattered and stoked to have other artists and riders participate in this show – to see their artwork and how BMX has inspired or affected them is really very cool.

How did BMX inspire you in the beginning?
BMX has been the biggest inspiration for me my whole life as it was my life. Like kids today I was a kid that aspired to riders I saw in the magazines then I became one of them, I toured and traveled the world riding my BMX bike, I started a BMX company and even today BMX is part of who I am as an adult as it comes up all the time in meetings. It’s been really cool.

How does BMX inspire you today?
At the core of who I am – I am a BMX’er. I’m proud of my sport and my heritage and what the sport has become today. Not many people get to ride a BMX bike, travel the world and make a living from it. Looking back, I’m lucky that I didn’t get promoted at the supermarket job back then, as I would most likely not be in this same position.



Click here to see all of the Lightning Bolt artwork that is up for auction this week. Don't miss out.

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