2.4 Rear/2.2 Front

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11/23/2019 3:15 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/23/2019 3:16 PM

Ride a Fit TwentyTwo. Honestly, my bag of tricks is limited jumping off curbs, manuals and hops, and just carving around wherever I am. At my age, an hour of this a few times a week satisfies my needs. I won’t be “hucking” much of anything. I’m not very good at any of these tricks, but my goal is to be damn good at them one day. My thought is to swap my 2.4 front tire onto the rear of my bike, and move the 2.2 up front. I am thinking this would give me a bigger tire patch out back for my manuals, and lighten the front end of the bike a tiny bit. Plus, after 40 years of motorcycles and hot rods, it’s far more aesthetically pleasing. This is free-style - I can do what I want, but I need to know if going against the long-settled fat-up-front practice is a mistake.

Appreciate your thoughts.

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11/23/2019 3:56 PM

I tried once, weirdest feeling ever.
The handling felt really strange, the bigger back tire added traction completely messed up the front when turning the bars more than 5°, the direction felt dangerous, like if the back tire wanted to ride faster than the front which leads to a super weird handling.
It’s hard to describe the feel with words but even if I really don’t recommend riding this way, just try it for the sake of experimentation and you’ll might understand what I said.

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11/23/2019 4:01 PM

It’s a no from me, seems to me it would be more of a hindrance but like you said you can do what you want, it’s freestyle.

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Ride everything

11/23/2019 4:05 PM

It may look good from a motorcycle perspective, but on a BMX it's not gonna feel good. There's a reason nobody runs that, it's not practical. But we can't stop you at the end of the day.

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11/23/2019 4:28 PM

readybmxer wrote:

It may look good from a motorcycle perspective, but on a BMX it's not gonna feel good. There's a reason nobody runs that, it's not practical. But we can't stop you at the end of the day.

What do you mean by “not practical?” My understanding is that it originated with racing, and that it added extra traction in berms/turns. Since I’m not racing, not doing nose tricks and not landing hard on the front end, shouldn’t a larger tread patch on the rear be beneficial to the riding I am doing, which is mostly cruising around and attempts at mastering a manual?

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11/23/2019 4:32 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/23/2019 4:37 PM

Francky wrote:

I tried once, weirdest feeling ever.
The handling felt really strange, the bigger back tire added traction completely messed up the front when turning the bars more than 5°, the direction felt dangerous, like if the back tire wanted to ride faster than the front which leads to a super weird handling.
It’s hard to describe the feel with words but even if I really don’t recommend riding this way, just try it for the sake of experimentation and you’ll might understand what I said.

I like the idea of more traction out back, and you’re right, I should just swap them and try it for myself. I can see where maybe the front would be too light, and turn in too quickly with a smaller tire up front. Hundreds of thousands of miles riding motorcycles tells me thin up front works fine, though.

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11/23/2019 4:36 PM

Jibby wrote:

It’s a no from me, seems to me it would be more of a hindrance but like you said you can do what you want, it’s freestyle.

Not being a smart ass, but what does it hinder? Telling me running a skinnier tire up front is an impractical hinderance doesn’t tell me much at all.

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11/23/2019 4:46 PM

Francky wrote:

I tried once, weirdest feeling ever.
The handling felt really strange, the bigger back tire added traction completely messed up the front when turning the bars more than 5°, the direction felt dangerous, like if the back tire wanted to ride faster than the front which leads to a super weird handling.
It’s hard to describe the feel with words but even if I really don’t recommend riding this way, just try it for the sake of experimentation and you’ll might understand what I said.

Furyus George wrote:

I like the idea of more traction out back, and you’re right, I should just swap them and try it for myself. I can see where maybe the front would be too light, and turn in too quickly with a smaller tire up front. Hundreds of thousands of miles riding motorcycles tells me thin up front works fine, though.

The main difference with motorcycle is that motorcycles have a much slacker head tube, and also that the bars stays pretty much straight every time since you turn with body weight more than anything else.


About the overall weight, generally the front end is not problematic but shaving some weight off the rear triangle is always appreciated and make the bike easier to lift and spin around.

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11/23/2019 5:10 PM

1.75 front and rear for MAXIMUM SPEED

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fack off

11/23/2019 5:13 PM

I would disagree that you turn a motorcycle with body weight. You turn by moving the handlebars. It might look like they stay straight at all times, especially at speed, but that’s just because it takes less movement with higher speeds and heavier weight to initiate a change in direction. Shifting body weight obviously can contribute to making a directional change, but if you’re not moving the bars, you’re not going to make much of a turn.

The weight of a motorcycle and the speed it can obtain makes it a lot different than a BMX bike for certain. So is stability the reason I want a wider tire up front? With my limited skill and speed, is a 2.2 that much less stable than a 2.4? Why don’t other bicycle disciplines adhere to this rule?

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11/23/2019 5:14 PM

adamnmexican wrote:

1.75 front and rear for MAXIMUM SPEED

I wish someone made 1.75’s for the 22” bikes. I’d be all over them in a minute.

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11/23/2019 5:27 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/23/2019 5:30 PM

I run a pair of 2.35s but if I had your tyres, I'd always prefer to run the larger tyre in the rear; it just makes it a little more stable in manuals and the skinny in the front makes it easier to turn on the nose. I also prefer to land rear wheel first when I hit a drop and having the extra cushion of a bigger tyre makes the landings nice and smooth.

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11/23/2019 5:29 PM

I had to ride like that for awhile, didn’t stop me from doing any tricks I normally did during that time period

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old edit

11/23/2019 5:40 PM

p1p1092 wrote:

I run a pair of 2.35s but if I had your tyres, I'd always prefer to run the larger tyre in the rear; it just makes it a little more stable in manuals and the skinny in the front makes it easier to turn on the nose. I also prefer to land rear wheel first when I hit a drop and having the extra cushion of a bigger tyre makes the landings nice and smooth.

Seems to me that having more meat out back surely couldn’t hurt my manuals, and a lighter, quicker front end wouldn’t either. Not going to be hitting too many drops at my age, so landings really aren’t a concern. Wish weather/work/life were more cooperative so I could swap them out and find out for myself. Cold, dark and raining at the moment.

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11/23/2019 5:45 PM

OneGuyIlluminatiEye wrote:

I had to ride like that for awhile, didn’t stop me from doing any tricks I normally did during that time period

Frankly, I think the majority ride wide up front because that’s how it’s done, and don’t question it. I can see the benefit on a dirt race track but not so much on the pavement. Why do you need a fat front tire to go grind rails at the park?

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11/23/2019 7:49 PM

Bigger tire up front = more grip, thus being less likely to wash out your front tire when turning/ leaning. It's usually a lot easier to recover from losing traction in the rear vs. losing traction in the front.

The reason for the skinny tire in the rear is to simply reduce roll resistance, rotational weight and increase acceleration. Also, since we're on bikes and not motorcycles the chances of losing traction in the rear when accelerating is not the same.

Some people like the cushion a bigger tire gives up front (easier on the wrist). While having less give/ bounce from a narrower/ harder tire in the rear.

Lastly, HTA will be slightly more steep with bigger tire in the rear (could be good, or bad).

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11/23/2019 11:09 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/23/2019 11:13 PM

Id say you'd be best with larger up front than rear for most things.

Have you considered just getting another 2.4 and run 2.4 front and back? It feels good although I like a 2.4 front, 2.25 rear combo the best from all I've experimented with.

See if you like a small tire up front, it wont be dangerous, it might just feel weird. I have seen many people accidentaly put a smaller tire up front and not notice.

I personally have tried a smaller tire up front and did not like it at all, felt very strange.

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11/23/2019 11:10 PM

Bryan91 wrote:

Bigger tire up front = more grip, thus being less likely to wash out your front tire when turning/ leaning. It's usually a lot easier to recover from losing traction in the rear vs. losing traction in the front.

The reason for the skinny tire in the rear is to simply reduce roll resistance, rotational weight and increase acceleration. Also, since we're on bikes and not motorcycles the chances of losing traction in the rear when accelerating is not the same.

Some people like the cushion a bigger tire gives up front (easier on the wrist). While having less give/ bounce from a narrower/ harder tire in the rear.

Lastly, HTA will be slightly more steep with bigger tire in the rear (could be good, or bad).

Id like to add, feebles feel a bit better with a smaller tire in the rear.

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11/24/2019 4:00 AM

It’s your bike, do whatever you please with it.


Back when I was young and big tires were coming about - I put a 2.35” (2.4 inflated) Demolition Momentum in the rear expecting it to make manuals super easy. 2.2” Odyssey up front.
Rode it like that for a month or so and this was my experience;

- Manuals got significantly harder. The amount of resistance against the big back tire, as well as being higher off the ground made me really have to fight to keep them going.
- Shredded holes in the sidewalls super quickly on feebles - never had that issue coming from a 2.2”
- Just cruising around the neighborhood felt noticeably worse & just plain goofy. It was harder to pedal & maintain speed, all while leaning more forward on the bike.
- The front end felt more squirrelly than the rear, and more likely to wash out.
- My wheels felt super unbalanced when bunnyhopping and doing 180s/360s. The rear wheel felt unnecessarily heavy compared to the front due to the larger tire and rear hub.

I ended up swapping the tires around and it felt a million times better in every way. More cushion for the wrists & footjams, both wheels weren’t too far off in weight, didn’t hang up on feebles anymore, etc. I liked it this way so much that I began riding all of my set ups with a smaller tire in the rear (until recent years.)



As stated above, maybe you should just get another 2.4 for the rear? Or put your 2.4 in the rear and get a lighter 2.4 for the front if you really think you’ll benefit from the weight difference. Could even just get some alloy nipples to save about the same amount of weight!
But at the end of the day - a small front tire and big rear makes for quite the goofy set-up.

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11/24/2019 8:12 AM

Bryan91 wrote:

Bigger tire up front = more grip, thus being less likely to wash out your front tire when turning/ leaning. It's usually a lot easier to recover from losing traction in the rear vs. losing traction in the front.

The reason for the skinny tire in the rear is to simply reduce roll resistance, rotational weight and increase acceleration. Also, since we're on bikes and not motorcycles the chances of losing traction in the rear when accelerating is not the same.

Some people like the cushion a bigger tire gives up front (easier on the wrist). While having less give/ bounce from a narrower/ harder tire in the rear.

Lastly, HTA will be slightly more steep with bigger tire in the rear (could be good, or bad).

These seem like legitimate reasons for running wide tires up front. Hadn’t thought about a large rear tire having an effect on HTA - interesting.

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11/24/2019 8:20 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/24/2019 8:21 AM

HardBMX_Tim wrote:

It’s your bike, do whatever you please with it.


Back when I was young and big tires were coming about - I put a 2.35” (2.4 inflated) Demolition Momentum in the rear expecting it to make manuals super easy. 2.2” Odyssey up front.
Rode it like that for a month or so and this was my experience;

- Manuals got significantly harder. The amount of resistance against the big back tire, as well as being higher off the ground made me really have to fight to keep them going.
- Shredded holes in the sidewalls super quickly on feebles - never had that issue coming from a 2.2”
- Just cruising around the neighborhood felt noticeably worse & just plain goofy. It was harder to pedal & maintain speed, all while leaning more forward on the bike.
- The front end felt more squirrelly than the rear, and more likely to wash out.
- My wheels felt super unbalanced when bunnyhopping and doing 180s/360s. The rear wheel felt unnecessarily heavy compared to the front due to the larger tire and rear hub.

I ended up swapping the tires around and it felt a million times better in every way. More cushion for the wrists & footjams, both wheels weren’t too far off in weight, didn’t hang up on feebles anymore, etc. I liked it this way so much that I began riding all of my set ups with a smaller tire in the rear (until recent years.)



As stated above, maybe you should just get another 2.4 for the rear? Or put your 2.4 in the rear and get a lighter 2.4 for the front if you really think you’ll benefit from the weight difference. Could even just get some alloy nipples to save about the same amount of weight!
But at the end of the day - a small front tire and big rear makes for quite the goofy set-up.

Surprised you found manuals harder. I figured the added contact would provide stability, but hadn’t considered resistance. The more I think about it I can see where a larger rear tire might hurt my manuals if there is increased resistance. Physics, as I learned with motorcycles, is a bitch. I’m probably correct that the larger rear tire is more stable, but the cost is resistance. Physics always demands her due.

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11/24/2019 8:27 AM

Bulletpup wrote:

Id say you'd be best with larger up front than rear for most things.

Have you considered just getting another 2.4 and run 2.4 front and back? It feels good although I like a 2.4 front, 2.25 rear combo the best from all I've experimented with.

See if you like a small tire up front, it wont be dangerous, it might just feel weird. I have seen many people accidentaly put a smaller tire up front and not notice.

I personally have tried a smaller tire up front and did not like it at all, felt very strange.

I think I would like a smaller tire up front, and I think the solution for me is running 2.2 front and rear. The 2.4 just feels sluggish and slow to me. I wish I could do what adamnmexican suggested and run a couple of 1.75’s or even 1.95’s, but no one makes them that I’ve found.

I appreciate everyone’s input.

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11/24/2019 9:04 AM

I don't see what the problem is.. 😃

Photo

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11/24/2019 9:11 AM

Black Swamp Ghost wrote:

I don't see what the problem is.. 😃

Photo

Had a Cotton Picker coaster back in ‘70. They didn’t handle very well but oozed cool for an eight-year old.

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11/24/2019 9:30 AM

Black Swamp Ghost wrote:

I don't see what the problem is.. 😃

Photo

Furyus George wrote:

Had a Cotton Picker coaster back in ‘70. They didn’t handle very well but oozed cool for an eight-year old.

Yeah for coolness those Krates were hard to beat.. I built one up for my son and he didn't like it and it was too big for him (9yo). Then I bought him a used Verde BMX and he immediately took to it like it was an old friend of his.. Now we both ride BMX together..

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11/24/2019 9:40 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/24/2019 9:41 AM

A modern BMX would ride so much better for a kid. I bet my coaster weighed 40 lbs, and the 5-speed krates probably weighed nearly 50. Funny, a couple of years after my krate I was making “dirt bikes” out of old Sting-Rays. No bling whatsoever.

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11/24/2019 9:52 AM

Lol yeah my first "BMX" was a dirt-ray too..

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11/24/2019 12:01 PM

I think it's a good idea. Geometry and handling doesn't really matter when you're just hopping curbs. It'd look sweet, go for it. Get those Chase Hawk tires that look like sportbike tires.

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11/24/2019 12:07 PM

Does Innova still make the 2.1s? I think that's the smallest 22 tire.

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11/24/2019 6:09 PM

S&M Mainlines come 22X2.1

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