24" bmx for kid used to 24" walmart full sus "mountain" bike?

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9/25/2017 2:13 AM


What do you all think? Would it be a smooth transition?

My thoughts are

- higher quality
- better parts compatibility with my bikes
- lighter
- more simple to maintain
- more reliable
- cooler looking imo

Negatives:
- harder to ride uphill (he rides up a big hill after school)

Hes not into doing tricks or anything and I dont think he is the type to want to get into that in the future either but Parts compatibility is important to me and he always has difficulty with maintaining his bike. I end up always fixing it for him. His chain will come off or his bike wont shift etc.

I want to get him something nice for christmas, he never gets excited about getting a bike for christmas but I am not going to buy another throwaway bike. If he ends up hating it, i will keep it.

Any thoughts? I was looking at the 2017 redline asset. Full chromoly everything and nice looking.

I have ridden a couple 24"s but never sat down and tried to ride due to the seat usually being slammed is it just as uncomfortable to sit down and ride as a 20" or would there be a noticeable difference in ridability while sitting? Obviously seat could be adjusted but im speaking frame geometry wise.
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9/25/2017 5:11 AM

I used to ride 24's (& still have a Floval Flyer). If you leave enough seat post to raise it up, it's like riding a BMX from the 80's/90's. I think it would be fine. On th3e other hand, I have seen several high quality modern mountain bikes for sale through FB marketplace recently so that would also be an option. You are correct that a BMX would be a lot more simple with less things to go wrong & need adjusting. It's really a point of whether or not he'll ride the bike. Doesn't sound like he's real excited about bikes at all so, you may want to think ahead for yourself (not being greedy, just practical). How old is he?

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9/25/2017 6:27 AM

He is 11 and he rides both to and from school (not sure how hes going to do in the winter (probably ride the city bus) but its a big part of his life and he also rides to local city parks to play tennis and whatnot. He also occasionally rides to the grocery store to pick up small things for dinners and such.

He has never just rode by himself just for fun, as long as there is a goal though, he rides.

Thats why I think he should have a bike, one that he could trust a bit easier. I have tried to sit down with him numerous times to teach him how to change tirss, adjust his brakes, etc. Im sure hes strong enough to pump his tires up to around 40 or 50 psi. Basically hes the type that just doesnt care about his bikes until they dont work, then if someone doesnt fix it, it becomes the very first peice in a pile of junk wherever he last parked it...lol

I dont think he would be able to lift his current bike if he had to, the thing weighs a shit ton he has trouble getting it up 1 step. I guarantee that a modern 24" would be more manageable especially without all those gears and extra shifter weird shit hanging everywhere. Lol

In all seriousness, i would feel so much better spending money on parts that would be usable for all our bikes. My goal would then be to outfit his mother with a more streamlined bike.

Now a serious issue... visability

It would be much more likely to be stolen. A walmart bike LOOKS like a walmart bike. Especially to a trained eye, a serious bike LOOKS like a serious bike. Especially to a trained eye.

He is pretty good about locking his bike up but who knows what he does when hes in a hurry or if he just locks it on the front wheel one day thinking that it will be ok. Idk, i hate bike theives and I never leave my bike on a rack but its a big part of his routine. Patterns create possible theft. Some guy sees him riding down the street one day, makes a mental note. Same guy sees him the next and the next, decides to follow or at least head the direction. Puts 2 and 2 together and heads to the nearest school in the area...boom there the bike sits. He knows he roughly has 6-7 hours before school is let out. Comes back with a few tools and gone. Front wheel is still there, though.

Also he has trouble with getting taken advantage of in terms of people riding his bikes. They always ask, I instruct him to just say no firmly but he always gives in if someone is the least bit persistant. Thats a bigger problem if the bike is more expensive.

Or say some asshole teen recognizes the value of his new bike, thats a BIG problem.

Those are my biggest worries now that I think about it more...

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9/25/2017 6:28 AM

Mishinn_Control wrote:

I used to ride 24's (& still have a Floval Flyer). If you leave enough seat post to raise it up, it's like riding a BMX ...more

FB as in facebook?

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9/25/2017 7:49 AM

Mishinn_Control wrote:

I used to ride 24's (& still have a Floval Flyer). If you leave enough seat post to raise it up, it's like riding a BMX ...more

Bulletpup wrote:

FB as in facebook?

Correct.

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9/25/2017 8:00 AM

Bulletpup wrote:

He is 11 and he rides both to and from school (not sure how hes going to do in the winter (probably ride the city bus) but its ...more

I don't have any kids but I have had my share of bikes stolen & seen others as they were taken advantage of & consequently had their bikes stolen. I was thinking the exact same thing about having a "desirable" bike as opposed to a throw away. Any chance you could replace crap parts with better parts on the crap frame?

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9/25/2017 9:45 AM

sounds to me like HE needs to put some money into it so that it doesn't just become another disposable item that daddy will fix for him. Like, if he is invested in it, he might take it more seriously? I had to do the same thing with my step-son years ago. He had grown up in the world of "parents buy me something; I destroy it; I cry, whine, and threaten; they buy me a new one". When I came into the picture (he was 11), and he saw that bikes could be cooler than just Wally-trash, he wanted his own good bike. I made him pay for 3/4's of i (at 11 years old via doing chores etc)t, and he has to pay for all of the repair. We do the repair together, but he has to buy parts. He treats the bike like gold now. Aside from the usual wear it gets form practicing BMX stuff, it is very well respected....

...now if I could get him to do that with other stuff!!

Make him have some kind of attachment or investment to it...

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I've Got sXe!!!
Up The Antix/Up The Punx
1988 Mongoose Caifornian Pro
2015 Surly Krampus

"Running Is dumb" - Dave Lawrence

9/25/2017 12:08 PM

sXeBMXer wrote:

sounds to me like HE needs to put some money into it so that it doesn't just become another disposable item that daddy will ...more

You are correct, sxe! Im wanting something nice for a gift, I hate spending money on things that wont be used. And that is a great way to exemplify somethings worth. And he does actually do work for money and such. Im glad you found success in your methods!

Mishinn I actually have some parts to make it look worse if the gift ends up happening, but I think it would be a more presentable gift if it were really nice looking.

I have actually considered making my bikes shittier looking too...only was able to bring myself to remove stickers but I considered getting like 3 different spray cans and painting it pink, brown, and white in a random unnattractive looking way. Lol

I know anytime you get something nice, someone somewhere might notice it, might want it, etc. It might just have to be the case that he is more dilligent and gives off a "not easily taken advantage of" vibe. Size and confidence of movement are both key for this. 1 or both will come with time, i suppose. I also dont want to hold a gift from him just based on a maybe...

That would be like me not riding bmx because there is a possibility of me dying or breaking bones and all that.

I think the most important factors are
1. Would he use it.
2. Would he take care of it.
3. Would it feel too big?

The only bike that seems even remotely worth the money is a 21" tt

I would have to raise the seat maybe even get a longer seatpost than what comes with the bike. I always try and make him see the importance of standing while pedaling and sitting pretty much only for coasting, this bike would emphasise that mentality.

Man...too many factors lol

I just know, his bike is getting pretty haggard and I absolutely will not buy another throwaway...

I know a real mountain bike would be the easiest transition but not only are they crazy expensive even for an entry level decent bike. Parts compatibility gets thrown out the window and ease of repair does too. I want him to eventually be able to take care of his own bike. Thats why I think a bmx related bike would be best because of the standardazation parts-wise and just the simpler-is-better designs.

I think one of the main reasons he has yet to appreciate his bikes is he hasnt truly grasped the importance of transportation. I think that is partially his generation as most days he would be fine if he didnt have to leave the house at all, He prefers electronics. Thats another reason why I want to stray away from gifts that hold him inside.

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9/25/2017 7:11 PM

you bring up the idea of the importance of the bike to his transportation. When I was from about 6 years old until I could drive, my bike was my life...b/c my parents refused to take me anywhere. Well, more specifically, they both worked to support our family, so they had no choice. If I wanted to go anywhere, it was on my bike. Granted, it was the 70's, and it was a bit safer to be out and about, but still. I was told that I could do whatever activities I wanted...as long as I could get my ass there on my bike. We were told we would be driven to only 2 activities, and one HAD to be with music. I chose band, and Boy Scouts as my 2 activities that they would drive me to. I rode my bike to everything else, including hockey in the winter...hockey bag and all strapped to my back, cruising to the rink on my Mongoose!!

This whole mentality made me appreciate MANY things in my life, and kept me from being half-involved and half-interested in too many activities. I am glad for that. It also kept me outside - which was not really an issue with me anyways since I loved the outdoors.

Maybe along with him having to pay for some of the bike, you also get him to get out and get invovled with geting himself to things that he likes to do.

Again, with my step son, he now rides to everything but band and hockey. Mostly b/c the rink is too far away for him to ride safely (10 miles in the middle of nowhere). If he wants to do an "impulse activity", he has to get himself there. He rides his bike everywhere now. It is pretty cool. We don't have any video games over here, so when he is here, he is either playing drums, riding bikes, or other things. At real dads, it is the opposite...4 different game systems. Real dad comes home and throws a frozen pizza at him and says "nuke this. Don't make a F-ing mess" We spend a lot of time undoing some really stupid stuff....

But anyways, next time you hear "Dad, I am hungry/bored/etc,", just say, "Hey you've got a job. and a bike, The world is your oyster"

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I've Got sXe!!!
Up The Antix/Up The Punx
1988 Mongoose Caifornian Pro
2015 Surly Krampus

"Running Is dumb" - Dave Lawrence

9/25/2017 8:18 PM

sXeBMXer wrote:

you bring up the idea of the importance of the bike to his transportation. When I was from about 6 years old until I could ...more

Nice to hear, you had an interesting childhood. Seems to have been for the better. I like the concept.

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