Building Backyard Foam Pit

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4/22/2016 9:21 AM

Hi Guys,

So I want to build a backyard foam pit to learn to flip and stuff. I heard the easiest way to do it is to buy a pool and fill it with cushion and mattress foam etc... First of all, will this work? Second, apparently it is best to learn to flip on a ramp which is at least 5 to 6 feet high. However the pools all seem to be about 3 feet high. So is it possible and safe to put a 6 foot ramp next to the 3 foot pool. The pool in question is 13 foot long 6.5 foot wide and as I said 3 foot deep. So, will this work? Is it safe to put the 6 foot ramp with the 3 foot pit? Any tips for where to get foam?

Thanks in advance for all of your replies.

Best wishes,

Cameron

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4/22/2016 9:43 AM

I have no idea how much thought you have put into this or if you have already solved this problem but when it rains is the foam not going to be really disgusting and it will not dry because it is in a pool which is meant to hold water. I don't know of anything else as I will never touch a foam pit and I ride street. Just wondering if you have thought of the water sitting in the foam. I know I wouldn't want to land in water or wet foam and I definitely wouldn't let my bike touch it.

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4/22/2016 9:45 AM

Well obviously a tarp would cover it when its not in use. Im pretty sure 3 feet isnt deep enough though...

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Smoke Drink Die

4/22/2016 9:46 AM

3 feet sounds too shallow, especially when learning upside-down tricks where your head's facing the ground like flips and stuff. I'd try something deeper, maybe about the same height as your ramp... So I guess a 6 foot ramp would be good with a 6 foot tall pool. Also, get a tarp large enough to cover the whole top when it rains.

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4/22/2016 9:52 AM

Are they any pools you can suggest which are available for sale in the uk?

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4/22/2016 10:09 AM

OK then. if swimming pools are not an option what other semi portable, (quick set up and deconstruction), options are there?

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4/22/2016 10:15 AM

Would putting up some posts in a rectangular shape, and then surrounding with safety mesh work? If so what are the best dimensions

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4/22/2016 11:04 AM

Your in the uk and your going to spend money to build a pit ? That doesn't make sense from what I've seen the uk had quite a few pits at indoor parks , if you where in Canada it would make sense we have 2 in our whole country

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4/22/2016 11:06 AM

The pit is for not for the UK it is for southern France

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4/22/2016 11:07 AM

what would you suggest for foam alternatives?

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4/22/2016 11:09 AM

Foam can be expensive , airbags seem to be blowing up these days but they seem expensive too

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4/22/2016 11:13 AM

How much does an airbag cost? Assuming that both options will be too expensive is there another way for me to learn flips safely without either pit or bag?

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4/22/2016 11:26 AM

Foam pits typically get 6X6 or 8X8 foam cubes, they run nearly a buck each. A local park to me had afoam pit around 4-5 feet deep with a trampoline under the foam to absorb more shock, it was 16X16 I think, and they spent $14,000 just on the foam.

It was indoor and the foam was still SUPER GROSS after like 6 months. I learn how to rotate flips into it, and I AM SO GLAD I WENT THAT ROUTE and didn't just try to huck one somewhere. I would have landed on my neck for my first roughly 10-15 tries, then on my face for probably the next 10 tries. I had no one to teach me what to do, and just spent almost a whole session figuring them out. I got em down to landing on my bike on the wheels on the trampoline part of that pit (knocked foam out of the way) then tipped over. Never tried it for realsies though.

As to quick setup/removal, that's not really an option with a foam pit. You would want the walls to be stiff, the bottom to have some give in case you lawn dart into the foam, and to be wide enough and long enough for accidental carving/wind. Minimum of 5 feet before you hit the bottom of it. FILLED with foam.

Just build a junker bike, a kicker and go find a dock and a lake or sea. WAY cheaper. Hit the kicker and land in water.

Another option is snow if you have enough and get powdery snow. You can also look at learning into wood chips/VERY loose dirt, but I would use that as a next step after learning how to crank the rotation well.

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"Hey anybody ever make that mistake like right when you wake up in the morning and you believe in yourself?" -Kyle Kinane

"BIKES!" -Tom Segura

4/22/2016 11:33 AM

Thanks a lot Dave I'll definitely try lake jumping instead of building a foam pit because it is SOOOO expensive. Does anyone know anything about the cost of a resi ramp?

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4/25/2016 4:48 AM

Ive heard of a lot of people going to a mattress shop and asking if they have any old mattress' that they are throwing out, usually they will give them to you for free or for a low price

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4/25/2016 4:55 AM

Get a cheapo bike, and tie a life jacket to it, and then put a ramp on a dock over a lake.

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4/25/2016 7:07 AM

Learn it onto wood like us OG's did, my friend put an old mattress on top of the jump box which seemed to work pretty well.

It's amazing how much easier things are when the risk of landing on wood/concrete is thrown into the mix.

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4/27/2016 9:08 AM

I'd recommend learning to flip at the nearest indoor park equipped with a foam pit. Go as early as humanly possible when it's quiet, preferably a week day.

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4/27/2016 12:53 PM

ken0y wrote:

I'd recommend learning to flip at the nearest indoor park equipped with a foam pit. Go as early as humanly possible when it's quiet, preferably a week day.

Or rent the park for a few hours with some homies.

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"Hey anybody ever make that mistake like right when you wake up in the morning and you believe in yourself?" -Kyle Kinane

"BIKES!" -Tom Segura