Can you do flatland tricks on a freestyle bmx?

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1/7/2019 12:59 AM

Can you do flatland tricks on a regular freestyle bmx?

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1/7/2019 1:37 AM

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1/7/2019 5:51 AM

Yes. People in the 80s did them on race bikes.

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1/7/2019 5:57 AM

Nope. It's impossible.


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1/7/2019 6:25 AM

JPC wrote:

Yes. People in the 80s did them on race bikes.

Have you watched a video from the 80’s? They most definitely had flatland specific bike back then...

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1/7/2019 6:32 AM

JPC wrote:

Yes. People in the 80s did them on race bikes.

bobPA wrote:

Have you watched a video from the 80’s? They most definitely had flatland specific bike back then...

not really,all bikes were pretty much the same.

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It’s all bmx

1/7/2019 7:24 AM

JPC wrote:

Yes. People in the 80s did them on race bikes.

bobPA wrote:

Have you watched a video from the 80’s? They most definitely had flatland specific bike back then...

Ah, videos!

I actually rode in the 80's. There were plenty of people who rode all styles of freestyle on regular old BMX bikes - nothing special at all.

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1/7/2019 7:24 AM

JPC wrote:

Yes. People in the 80s did them on race bikes.

bobPA wrote:

Have you watched a video from the 80’s? They most definitely had flatland specific bike back then...

adamnmexican wrote:

not really,all bikes were pretty much the same.

Having lived (& ridden) thru this period of the sport (and that of the time just before it) I can verify there were no flatland specific bikes. At least nothing that was promoted as such. Sure there was different geometry but overall they were all "freestyle" bikes. It wasn't until around the late 80's that I ever noticed any sort of differentiation for flatland and park/ramp bikes being promoted as such when the Haro Master & Sport came out.

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1/7/2019 7:26 AM

i rode in the 80's.

first 'freestyle' bikes were, you took your race bike and put a coaster brake and front brakes on. ta'da! you had a freestyle bike.

then they started making "freestyle" frames/forks by welding 'standing platforms' onto race frames.

you can do flatland on any bike you want too. Especially if you're just starting out.

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1/7/2019 7:35 AM

pnj wrote:

i rode in the 80's.

first 'freestyle' bikes were, you took your race bike and put a coaster brake and front brakes on. ta'da! you had a freestyle bike.

then they started making "freestyle" frames/forks by welding 'standing platforms' onto race frames.

you can do flatland on any bike you want too. Especially if you're just starting out.

Yup.

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1/7/2019 8:21 AM

Can and do.

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BMX over 30: Eat clean, Stretch, and Pray.

1/7/2019 9:49 AM

all those 80s and early 90s gt's and haros were good for were flatland

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Lessons not learned in blood are soon forgotten

1/7/2019 11:27 AM

Modern-day speaking, Matthias Dandois does it and does it really well.

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Scooter kid trying to ride a bike.
@scootereyn

1/7/2019 11:32 AM

I rode in the 80’s too!

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1/7/2019 11:46 AM

readybmxer wrote:

Modern-day speaking, Matthias Dandois does it and does it really well.

There's really very little difference between today's "tech" frames and a mid school flatland bike. A 19.5 inch TT S&M Dagger might as well be a flatland frame.

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1/7/2019 11:50 AM

JPC wrote:

There's really very little difference between today's "tech" frames and a mid school flatland bike. A 19.5 inch TT S&M Dagger might as well be a flatland frame.

Yeah I get what you’re saying. My 19.69” Eastern Repeater is kinda flatland-ish.

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Scooter kid trying to ride a bike.
@scootereyn

1/7/2019 11:57 AM
Edited Date/Time: 1/7/2019 12:00 PM

JPC wrote:

There's really very little difference between today's "tech" frames and a mid school flatland bike. A 19.5 inch TT S&M Dagger might as well be a flatland frame.

i grew up riding 80's and 90s bikes and theres a huge difference between modern tech frames and old 80s/90s bikes. (was poor so always garage sales gettin haro masters and old performers/agressors) what you dont seem to realize is most of those old haros and GT's were like 73-74 headtube angles, with 14+ chainstays and short top tubes. some forks were 40mm offsett. everyone just beats their dicks to em because "nostalgia"

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Lessons not learned in blood are soon forgotten

1/7/2019 5:01 PM
Edited Date/Time: 1/7/2019 5:02 PM

readybmxer wrote:

Modern-day speaking, Matthias Dandois does it and does it really well.

JPC wrote:

There's really very little difference between today's "tech" frames and a mid school flatland bike. A 19.5 inch TT S&M Dagger might as well be a flatland frame.

RonnieRawdawg wrote:

i grew up riding 80's and 90s bikes and theres a huge difference between modern tech frames and old 80s/90s bikes. (was poor so always garage sales gettin haro masters and old performers/agressors) what you dont seem to realize is most of those old haros and GT's were like 73-74 headtube angles, with 14+ chainstays and short top tubes. some forks were 40mm offsett. everyone just beats their dicks to em because "nostalgia"

By mid school I mean more like 97-2002 flatland. Think GT show or quaman anything.
18-19 inch tt
12.5-13 rear end
75+ degree head tube angle.

Basically exactly the same as a modern tech frame save the lack of an internal headset and mid bottom bracket.

You’re the only person talking about shitty old haros.

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1/7/2019 8:22 PM

JPC wrote:

By mid school I mean more like 97-2002 flatland. Think GT show or quaman anything.
18-19 inch tt
12.5-13 rear end
75+ degree head tube angle.

Basically exactly the same as a modern tech frame save the lack of an internal headset and mid bottom bracket.

You’re the only person talking about shitty old haros.

i read it as old school miss the mid school part, my bad

2003 quamen g3 had a 76.5 HT though

1999 quamen g2 had 75 HT and 13.5 cs


1998 gt tour had a 14.59-14.98 CS and 74 HT but the SHOW was a 75HT with 13.5 as well

i had a 1998 DYNO Slammer, my first bike with 990s i loved that thing, i wanted a 98 show so bad but they were $1000

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Lessons not learned in blood are soon forgotten