Could use some help getting my frame ready to spray.....

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11/26/2019 11:17 AM

Questions:

How fine of sandpaper to use on frame before spraying? Do you need some roughness for the paint to adhere to or do you get it super smooth? I've been sanding with 60 grit to get the paint off, and have 120 and 220. Not sure how fine to go before spraying.

What grit to use for wet sanding?

Is primer necessary?

Do you guys ever spray when it's colder out? Another group I belong to suggest if you leave the frame and paint indoors, spray outside in the cold, and then bring back in to cure / dry, it's fine. But will take longer to dry. But then I get the opposite advice from some to not spray if below 70 degress. If I want to do it this winter, it'll be below 70 when I spray....

Lastly, seems a shame to cover up all that hard work of sanding. I almost just want to clear coat. But I do like colors too. Conflicted.... what do you think?

Not completely done but getting there:

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11/26/2019 12:08 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/26/2019 12:10 PM

My father retired from Ford Motor Co as a Painter and also painted cars in our garage on the side.

He painted many bikes for my friends and I.

Prep work is really Key.

He always sanded them them down, to bare, using various grits starting with a fairly course, working his way up to really fine and wet sanding. A lot was just Block sanding, but he had various Air and power sanders too.

Once done with sanding, he'd rinse with clean water, then use some clear stuff (forgot what it was) and a tacking cloth to wipe the frame down and make sure it was free of any grit, dirt or other contaminants.

Then he'd primer the frame and recheck his work, wet sand that a bit, and re-clean.

Then, he'd spray the paint on usually 2-3 coats with several mins between to let it dry and "tac" up.

Once done, he'd wet sand a bit more, clean again, then spray 1-3 clear coats then he took a buffer to them.

When he was done, they were always shined like crazy. 3 years later, they still looked wet to the touch, but were obviously long dry by then.

Never had any complaints about his paint jobs.

He use the same paints and materials from the Paint shop, that he used on the cars he painted.

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11/26/2019 1:54 PM

Wow, sounds like you would have nice looking bikes!!!!

I'm assuming he didn't use rattle cans... What about temperature? Missouri is quite a bit warmer than here in the winter I'm guessing.

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11/26/2019 2:44 PM

i mean... that's a child's bike frame. I wouldn't put too much effort into it.

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11/26/2019 2:55 PM

I've painted a lot of older bikes with Rustoleum with little problem. I tried not to paint below maybe 50ish F.

I'm definitely not a pro like the other poster's pops was but I followed a similar (albeit more primitive) process with decent results. Basically I'd sand down to bare with various grits (coarse to fine) and I didn't do any wet sanding. I'd give the frame a good scrub after that, prime it well (Rustoleum), let it dry/cure over 2-3 days (sometimes sanding between primer coats if I found problems), then I'd give it 2-3 coats top coats over several dals (also Rustoleum).

But I agree, prep is key. Also, lots of times the rattlecan will have operating temperatures listed on it. Get a paint for metals rather than plastics or woods and you'll have better results.

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11/26/2019 3:02 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/26/2019 3:11 PM

to pnj:

That's not what I asked. I know what it is.

Let me get to the point that I can be good enough to NEED something better than that. Then I may ask what is a good one to get. Most people go all in on a hobby and spend all kinds of money and don't even know how to use it. I'd rather spend a little bit of money, use it til I can't use it no more and then get something better if I stick with it and have the money.

And if I don't bust it, I hope to have grandkids someday and maybe I'll have something cool for them to ride.

Good gear doesn't make you good. It might help in some cases. But I'm a total newb. I don't need all that yet. Plus I have trees to cut down, mouths to feed, medical bills to pay off, tires to buy for my car, Christmas presents to buy. A lot more things that are more important than an expensive bmx frame for my hobby. Paint doesn't cost much. In fact I have some on hand I'm probably going to use.

I'm sorry if that doesn't live up to your standards. But maybe next time try and be helpful, instead of judging. Otherwise I'll start to tune you out. I'm sure I can learn something from you if that's you getting all that air in your pic. But I don't listen to people that look down on me.

If you were just trying to help, I understand. But I know what it is. I didn't need to be told the bike I rescued from the garbage isn't some high quality bike. LOL. Before I tore it down, I liked how it felt.

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11/26/2019 3:07 PM

granggg wrote:

I've painted a lot of older bikes with Rustoleum with little problem. I tried not to paint below maybe 50ish F.

I'm definitely not a pro like the other poster's pops was but I followed a similar (albeit more primitive) process with decent results. Basically I'd sand down to bare with various grits (coarse to fine) and I didn't do any wet sanding. I'd give the frame a good scrub after that, prime it well (Rustoleum), let it dry/cure over 2-3 days (sometimes sanding between primer coats if I found problems), then I'd give it 2-3 coats top coats over several dals (also Rustoleum).

But I agree, prep is key. Also, lots of times the rattlecan will have operating temperatures listed on it. Get a paint for metals rather than plastics or woods and you'll have better results.

I was just looking at all the Rustoleum colors at ACE. There are some piquing my interest. I have some dark blue krylon on hand though that I might use. But it's weird, that particular ACE didn't have any krylon. Cuz i was thinking about picking up some krylon primer. I've heard it's good to use same brand primer and paint and clear coat instead of mixing.

As far as temperature goes, I'm debating about putting up some plastic in my basement. But I sure would rather do it outside.

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11/26/2019 3:21 PM

granggg wrote:

I've painted a lot of older bikes with Rustoleum with little problem. I tried not to paint below maybe 50ish F.

I'm definitely not a pro like the other poster's pops was but I followed a similar (albeit more primitive) process with decent results. Basically I'd sand down to bare with various grits (coarse to fine) and I didn't do any wet sanding. I'd give the frame a good scrub after that, prime it well (Rustoleum), let it dry/cure over 2-3 days (sometimes sanding between primer coats if I found problems), then I'd give it 2-3 coats top coats over several dals (also Rustoleum).

But I agree, prep is key. Also, lots of times the rattlecan will have operating temperatures listed on it. Get a paint for metals rather than plastics or woods and you'll have better results.

Fortyseven wrote:

I was just looking at all the Rustoleum colors at ACE. There are some piquing my interest. I have some dark blue krylon on hand though that I might use. But it's weird, that particular ACE didn't have any krylon. Cuz i was thinking about picking up some krylon primer. I've heard it's good to use same brand primer and paint and clear coat instead of mixing.

As far as temperature goes, I'm debating about putting up some plastic in my basement. But I sure would rather do it outside.

It may just be me but I never had good luck with Krylon on bicycles. Worked well on other things but not so much on the bikes. I'm willing to chalk that up 100% to fluke, though.

Another little tip: find a piece of scrap steel somewhere and hit it with the paint color you want if you'd like to see what it's going to look like. I've been known to prime part of the bike with very little sanding and hit it with stripes of several colors to see what I liked the best. The dry color is often different than the can/cap.

I also forgot to mention that when I gave the frame "a good scrub", I just used a washcloth and warm water + dish soap.

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11/26/2019 3:40 PM

Well I'll take your experience under serious advisement. I have mostly krylon on hand but I do have two cans of Kilz. A primer and Hunter Green and 2 rustoleum. They are both a matte color though and I was wanting to do glossy. I don't think a clear coat over a matte color will look right, although I could be wrong. I'm not real keen on the rustoleum colors I currently have. One is like black wrought iron and the other is.... oh what was it called, it's like dark copper or something like that. I was wanting something more cheery. Or lighter.

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11/26/2019 3:47 PM

I've done a ton of painting of everything including a lot of bikes.. You can get a rattle can paint job to look better than most new car factory paint, and as good as any other paint.

I highly recommend Krylon regular, follow the instructions on the can, it dries quick, and you can recoat sooner than most other paints. Read the can, you have two time windows for more coats, if you do it soon enough, you don't have to sand between coats. For sanding between coats or sanding runs/drips out, you want 1200 to 2500 grit.

Drips/runs can be wet sanded out using a block of wood under the sand paper, even on your final coat. Once you get enough coats you do a final wet sand, then buff it out with rubbing compound..

Clear coat isn't always necessary, and can actually make touching up chips and scratches impossible to look good. Clear coat is important when applying different colors as graphics and stripes because it makes it look like one level again..

Important to wipe everything down with mineral spirits before painting and between coats..

Keep your hands clean and don't touch after wiping down with mineral spirits.. Avoid dusty areas and windy days outside..

That's a good bike to learn all this on..

This is my work...



Good luck!

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11/26/2019 4:07 PM

I know you're not asking this, but the best rattle can colors are all made by Krylon and Montana. Montana is expensive and meant for art applications, so I'd stick with krylon. Icy Grape looks awesome on bike frames!

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11/26/2019 4:14 PM

I've tried a lot of paint brands, Krylon is the most forgiving, most user friendly, runs/drips the least and also priced right.

I've had terrible experiences with Rust-Oleum for color coats.. I like their hi temp stuff, and their rust converter black for some things though..

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11/26/2019 5:12 PM

This can't be overstated.... DON'T FORGET THE PRIMER.

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11/26/2019 5:40 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/26/2019 6:27 PM

A lot of info on this thread. I've built custom cars for Toyota, Scion and custom paint as a hobby.
Here are my two cents for a spray can paint job:
1)sand what you have now with 400 grit
2)clean with wax and grease remover (prep-all comes in a spray can).
3) spray etch primer, light coats. Once it drys, scuff with either a gray (fine) or red (not as fine) 3m scuff pad. Then tack rag.
4) build primer, light coats again. Sand with 400 or 600 wet (water with a small amount of dish soap) until smooth. If you sand through reapply primer on spots and sand. Then tack rag.
5) paint color w/ medium wet coats (let flash in between coats) until full coverage and then two or three coats of clear.

Spray paint isn't the most durable paint but it looks good for awhile.
Anyway, I hope it helps. Lots of good info above me too.

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11/26/2019 6:25 PM

opened YouTube and this was on the front page. Lol.
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11/27/2019 2:31 AM

smullen wrote:

My father retired from Ford Motor Co as a Painter and also painted cars in our garage on the side.

He painted many bikes for my friends and I.

Prep work is really Key.

He always sanded them them down, to bare, using various grits starting with a fairly course, working his way up to really fine and wet sanding. A lot was just Block sanding, but he had various Air and power sanders too.

Once done with sanding, he'd rinse with clean water, then use some clear stuff (forgot what it was) and a tacking cloth to wipe the frame down and make sure it was free of any grit, dirt or other contaminants.

Then he'd primer the frame and recheck his work, wet sand that a bit, and re-clean.

Then, he'd spray the paint on usually 2-3 coats with several mins between to let it dry and "tac" up.

Once done, he'd wet sand a bit more, clean again, then spray 1-3 clear coats then he took a buffer to them.

When he was done, they were always shined like crazy. 3 years later, they still looked wet to the touch, but were obviously long dry by then.

Never had any complaints about his paint jobs.

He use the same paints and materials from the Paint shop, that he used on the cars he painted.

This is the correct way to paint properly and also the way I did my bike. I come from the same background. YES prep of the frame is key!

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11/27/2019 6:28 AM

Fortyseven wrote:

Wow, sounds like you would have nice looking bikes!!!!

I'm assuming he didn't use rattle cans... What about temperature? Missouri is quite a bit warmer than here in the winter I'm guessing.

Yea, they looked as good as factory, some depending on the color even better.

No rattle can, he always used DuPont, House of Kolor or whatever the paintshop sold that he bought all his auto paints from...

We tried a few with rattle can, can't remember the brand, but a few of them seemed to peel, scratch easy, or have rub marks from shoes and doing tricks, so he decided to try the Auto paints.

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11/27/2019 10:17 AM

Black Swamp Ghost wrote:

I've done a ton of painting of everything including a lot of bikes.. You can get a rattle can paint job to look better than most new car factory paint, and as good as any other paint.

I highly recommend Krylon regular, follow the instructions on the can, it dries quick, and you can recoat sooner than most other paints. Read the can, you have two time windows for more coats, if you do it soon enough, you don't have to sand between coats. For sanding between coats or sanding runs/drips out, you want 1200 to 2500 grit.

Drips/runs can be wet sanded out using a block of wood under the sand paper, even on your final coat. Once you get enough coats you do a final wet sand, then buff it out with rubbing compound..

Clear coat isn't always necessary, and can actually make touching up chips and scratches impossible to look good. Clear coat is important when applying different colors as graphics and stripes because it makes it look like one level again..

Important to wipe everything down with mineral spirits before painting and between coats..

Keep your hands clean and don't touch after wiping down with mineral spirits.. Avoid dusty areas and windy days outside..

That's a good bike to learn all this on..

This is my work...



Good luck!

Dang, the graphics are really cool!!! Great job. Do you use primer? I'm glad you like Krylon cuz that's what I have. I really think I'm going to go for the dark blue I have on hand. (two in the middle of the pic) It's a gloss finish. And I have two. Although they look like they're different types. But they are the same exact color. I think the one on the left is completely full though.... I doubt it'll take a whole can, eh?

I have kils primer but someone said you shouldn't mix paints..... I can get some krylon primer if it's necessary.

Lots of great responses guys. I appreciate it.

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11/27/2019 10:57 AM

Black Swamp Ghost wrote:

I've done a ton of painting of everything including a lot of bikes.. You can get a rattle can paint job to look better than most new car factory paint, and as good as any other paint.

I highly recommend Krylon regular, follow the instructions on the can, it dries quick, and you can recoat sooner than most other paints. Read the can, you have two time windows for more coats, if you do it soon enough, you don't have to sand between coats. For sanding between coats or sanding runs/drips out, you want 1200 to 2500 grit.

Drips/runs can be wet sanded out using a block of wood under the sand paper, even on your final coat. Once you get enough coats you do a final wet sand, then buff it out with rubbing compound..

Clear coat isn't always necessary, and can actually make touching up chips and scratches impossible to look good. Clear coat is important when applying different colors as graphics and stripes because it makes it look like one level again..

Important to wipe everything down with mineral spirits before painting and between coats..

Keep your hands clean and don't touch after wiping down with mineral spirits.. Avoid dusty areas and windy days outside..

That's a good bike to learn all this on..

This is my work...



Good luck!

Fortyseven wrote:

Dang, the graphics are really cool!!! Great job. Do you use primer? I'm glad you like Krylon cuz that's what I have. I really think I'm going to go for the dark blue I have on hand. (two in the middle of the pic) It's a gloss finish. And I have two. Although they look like they're different types. But they are the same exact color. I think the one on the left is completely full though.... I doubt it'll take a whole can, eh?

I have kils primer but someone said you shouldn't mix paints..... I can get some krylon primer if it's necessary.

Lots of great responses guys. I appreciate it.

Use primer that’s what fills in your small sand marks to make your surface smooth. 2-3 coats wet sand with 400-600. Look at your work and see if you need to re apply another coat or 2 and wet sand again until it’s 100% smooth or to your likeness then wash it Good with regular soap and water dry it and then paint and clear it.

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11/27/2019 11:08 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/27/2019 11:09 AM

Did a test spray of the two navy blues I have and they are definitely a different color. LOL.

Curious if it matters what color primer with what color paint you're using. I know with cars they used to have the different color primers to go with the different paint. Back in the 80's at least. LOL.

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11/27/2019 11:47 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/27/2019 11:49 AM

My two cents on Rustoleum paints.

Don’t buy any of the glitter finishes, it’s rough when it goes on and the glitter goes everywhere.

Also, what I’ve found is that the metallic versions seem to hold well in high-wear areas. For me, I hold my grips a little inwards to the point where my hands rub the bends. With the regular gloss and matte colors, it would start to smudge and wear off within a few days. But this current metallic black finish I have now has lasted me a few months and still looks fine.

Oh, and clear coat comes in matte and gloss.

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Scooter kid trying to ride a bike. Instagram: @scootereyn // YouTube: Reyn Honbo - RH MEDIA

11/27/2019 1:09 PM

Fortyseven wrote:

Did a test spray of the two navy blues I have and they are definitely a different color. LOL.

Curious if it matters what color primer with what color paint you're using. I know with cars they used to have the different color primers to go with the different paint. Back in the 80's at least. LOL.

Grey primer is used the most for all colors. Darker primers are for darker colors so the paint covers easier. Grey will be fine for what you are doing. It’s not like you are using like a high end HOK or PPG paint that calls for a light or dark primer and/or a black or white base before you actual color. But if you want it don’t hurt to try things out. That’s what’s fun about the custom side of painting.

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11/28/2019 1:14 AM

They sell a spray can primer at automotive paint stores. The brand is SEM, IMO it's one of the best and comes in 5(?) Colors, white, black, light gray, dark gray and maybe buff (yellow) or red oxide.
It's been so long since I've used spray cans. But everyone has a budget or starts somewhere.

Don't forget to post some pics when you're done.

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11/28/2019 3:26 PM

It is my first time and it probably won't be that great. LOL. But it's still fun. Plus the upside to pictures is you can't see the imperfections that well in pics. LOL.

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11/28/2019 3:40 PM

Just take your time and you will get it!

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11/28/2019 4:35 PM

Just want to put it out there that wire brushes that you can attach to a hand drill will work better and faster than any sandpaper or paint stripper.

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11/28/2019 5:17 PM

"Dang, the graphics are really cool!!! Great job. Do you use primer? "

Thanks, the graphics were made by painting it white first, then applying a laser cut masking kit cut to look exactly like how the Schwinns of that era were painted.

Yes I used a primer too..


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11/29/2019 9:12 AM

Super-Pawl wrote:

Just want to put it out there that wire brushes that you can attach to a hand drill will work better and faster than any sandpaper or paint stripper.

It's really weird, I borrowed a friend stuff that works on metal a lot. He gave me 4 different wire wheels of different shapes and his drill and I got nowhere with it. Plus it left smudging from whatever projects he's worked on in the past. I just want back to sandpaper and made a lot more headway. I'm probably doing something wrong but I'm fine sticking with sandpaper.

Now I do have another friend that bought himself a media blaster booth and I'm sort of itching to see how that would work on some other pieces I have. I'm debating on asking him to have a go at my forks.....

It's getting close to being ready.


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11/30/2019 2:03 AM

Blast everything metal you wanna paint. It’s quick and gets everything off.

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12/2/2019 10:08 AM

I'm ready to spray.... just need to get the time to do it. It's not perfectly clean but it's as close as I wanna get it by hand. degreased it last night with brake cleaner.

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