Crank Installers/Removers

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6/1/2017 3:08 AM

Hi,

I am thinking of getting the Shadow Conspiracy Crank Installation/Removal tool, (picture attached). However, before I do so I was wondering if someone could please explain to me how they actually worked because they appear to just be normal bolts with a glorified washer- how can this aid in the installation/removal of cranks?

Thanks in advance,

CameronPhoto

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6/1/2017 3:15 AM

It's 2 pieces.

The threaded part if inserted into the smaller sleeve part and into the cranks. Then you tighten the large bolt end and it pushes the crank arm on. To remove the cranks you set the sleeve to the side and thread the bolt piece into the crank arm at the spindle. Smack it with a hammer and it pushes the arm of the spindle without touching the arm.

Very handy too, also easy to make yourself for cheap.

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6/1/2017 7:07 AM

what he^ said. Especially the last part. i don't think i'd drop 17 bucks for one. profile cranks come with one.

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6/1/2017 7:25 AM

If you don't have the shadow killer cranks, chances are those won't work with whatever cranks you've got.

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6/1/2017 1:12 PM

DanTheBikerMan wrote:

If you don't have the shadow killer cranks, chances are those won't work with whatever cranks you've got.

Most 19mm work on 19mm cranks.

But really the best way and really cheap way. Is a hardware store.

Take the spindle and a crank arm with you. Find a bolt about 3-4" long that fits the spindle. Then get about 6-8 washers that fit over the bolt and cover the hole where the spindle goes on the crank arm.

Works great and costs you say $5.00. Be SURE you ask for grades 8 or 9 on the bolt. That's aircraft grade and won't break on you. Even the tools break at times. That's why for 15 years now I go to the hardware store. Profile cranks come with a tool. But my last one broke and had to use a screw exacting bit on my drill to get the threaded area out of the spindle. Figured while I was at the store I will just get the bolt and washers instead of buying a tool for $15-20 and have the same thing happen sooner or later.

I also have a home made bottom bracket press. Works amazing and cost me $8.00. Google DIY bike work stands too. Cheaper and just as good as say a Park and won't cost you over $30.00. Walmart however has a nice one for $54, not too bad. That's just a few of my home built tools.

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6/2/2017 10:04 AM

I've gotta ask, I have been looking at this thread and at the shadow killer cranks and can not figure out what you need a crank tool for. Can you not just use the bolts that come with the cranks to install and remove them? I have enver built or bought a tool for cranks, always just use the bolts that come with it.

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6/2/2017 11:02 AM

RIDEboarder wrote:

I've gotta ask, I have been looking at this thread and at the shadow killer cranks and can not figure out what you need a ...more

Same. Get the arm on the splines a bit and tighten the bolt. Then to take the arm back off, undo the bolt a few threads and smack it with a rubber mallet. If the bolt can't stand that, I wouldn't be confident in it holding my crank arms on

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6/2/2017 12:48 PM

I've done the mallet thing, and it works, no doubt. Now I have one (two, actually!) of the park tools, and I will never go back to the mallet method. Maybe it's just my aversion to banging the snot out of anything, but the purpose-built tool is—to me anyway—just a far better/smoother/faster experience.

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6/2/2017 5:27 PM

RIDEboarder wrote:

I've gotta ask, I have been looking at this thread and at the shadow killer cranks and can not figure out what you need a ...more

ease of installation mostly. you could use the bolts and just tighten them, but a crank installation tool allows the use of a larger wrench for more leverage and not just a skinny allen key. Not to mention if the wrench slips or the person isn't very competent, they could round out the allen key broach too and then they'd need new bolts. The crank tool would be a lot harder to do that to

but yeah for most people the crank bolts would work just fine

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