Different brands of freewheels

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2/22/2020 11:34 AM

I'm new here. I have been out of the bmx for 35 just getting back into it. Don't know if I'm just not seeing anything on freewheels . Just looking for a information on the different brands of freewheels

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2/22/2020 11:42 AM

Freewheels are not very common these days, apart from the likes of department store bikes. These days, hubs usually have 9 tooth drivers that are integral to the hub, like this:
Photo

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2/22/2020 12:48 PM

If you're set on a freewheel, it doesn't get better than the white industries http://www.whiteind.com/new-page

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2/22/2020 3:45 PM

John_Botkin wrote:

I'm new here. I have been out of the bmx for 35 just getting back into it. Don't know if I'm just not seeing anything on freewheels . Just looking for a information on the different brands of freewheels

What you need to be looking for these days are called "cassette" hubs

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2/22/2020 4:11 PM

Like said above, a cassette would be the best thing, in my opinion, to re-start on in modern day BMX.

I don't mean to be pushy, but have you ever tried/ridden cassettes on current-day BMX bikes? Unless you really want a freewheel, I also recommend a cassette hub.

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2/22/2020 4:46 PM

The wheels I got are set up for a freewheel.
I'm not going to be doing much Freestyle I'm setting up more less a racer thinking about going to the local track

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2/23/2020 12:42 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/23/2020 12:46 AM

John_Botkin wrote:

The wheels I got are set up for a freewheel.
I'm not going to be doing much Freestyle I'm setting up more less a racer thinking about going to the local track

If you’ll be setting up a race style bike, even more so would you want a cassette. It’ll be much better suited and will be more solid on the track.

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2/23/2020 2:56 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/23/2020 2:57 AM

John_Botkin wrote:

The wheels I got are set up for a freewheel.
I'm not going to be doing much Freestyle I'm setting up more less a racer thinking about going to the local track

readybmxer wrote:

If you’ll be setting up a race style bike, even more so would you want a cassette. It’ll be much better suited and will be more solid on the track.

why is a cassette better? especially a 16 tooth cassette? i honestly would really like to know some actual facts, not opinions. not sure if your right, b ut they are easier to work on, besides that, they do exactly the same thing, and youd never know the difference by riding it i bet.

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2/23/2020 9:33 AM

The box to box freewheel is also quite nice. More points of engagement = faster engagement and reduces the latency. The white industries and box to box do this but also cost quite a bit more although not as expensive as a cassette hub.

If you don't care about a higher performance freewheel the basics are still out there from back in the day... ACS, Dicta, Suntour, Shimano. All are pretty average as they were 35 years ago. If you decide on one of those go for one that has the 4 prong for better removal.

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2/23/2020 10:27 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/23/2020 10:28 AM

ggallin422 wrote:

why is a cassette better? especially a 16 tooth cassette? i honestly would really like to know some actual facts, not opinions. not sure if your right, b ut they are easier to work on, besides that, they do exactly the same thing, and youd never know the difference by riding it i bet.

Everyone else is voicing their opinions on this thread too.

I understand some racers still prefer freewheels, but at a certain price point, I think a cassette would be more worth it. Like pursuit said, many of the freewheels from back in the day haven’t been updated, and it sounds like OP isn’t getting into full-fledged competition racing, just putting in some time at a track. Thus, spending money on a cassette versus a top-quality freewheel might be better suited both for his intentions with the bike and possibly monetary-wise.

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Scooter kid trying to ride BMX.
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2/23/2020 10:51 AM

I have been looking at the Profile elite freewheel it has 140 points of Engagement sealed Bearings and you can rebuild it

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2/23/2020 12:17 PM

John_Botkin wrote:

I have been looking at the Profile elite freewheel it has 140 points of Engagement sealed Bearings and you can rebuild it

There you go... best of the best. Enjoy!

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2/23/2020 12:25 PM

OP has a freewheel hub and is looking for a freewheel,not the hard sell on cassettes.

I have a eno on my psp since 09 with no issues,so I can vouch for those.

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2/23/2020 9:11 PM

readybmxer wrote:

If you’ll be setting up a race style bike, even more so would you want a cassette. It’ll be much better suited and will be more solid on the track.

ggallin422 wrote:

why is a cassette better? especially a 16 tooth cassette? i honestly would really like to know some actual facts, not opinions. not sure if your right, b ut they are easier to work on, besides that, they do exactly the same thing, and youd never know the difference by riding it i bet.

readybmxer wrote:

Everyone else is voicing their opinions on this thread too.

I understand some racers still prefer freewheels, but at a certain price point, I think a cassette would be more worth it. Like pursuit said, many of the freewheels from back in the day haven’t been updated, and it sounds like OP isn’t getting into full-fledged competition racing, just putting in some time at a track. Thus, spending money on a cassette versus a top-quality freewheel might be better suited both for his intentions with the bike and possibly monetary-wise.

Cassettes are better for freestyle because you aren’t changing gears all the time, but with racing a lot of people switch gear ratios on tracks hence the need for a freewheel (believe me, it’s WAY easier to change a freewheel driver than a cassette driver and plus you have more options). That’s why racing cranks and gears look way different than their freestyle counterparts. It’s honestly a different sport nowadays than back then.

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2/23/2020 9:57 PM

HavokDJ wrote:

Cassettes are better for freestyle because you aren’t changing gears all the time, but with racing a lot of people switch gear ratios on tracks hence the need for a freewheel (believe me, it’s WAY easier to change a freewheel driver than a cassette driver and plus you have more options). That’s why racing cranks and gears look way different than their freestyle counterparts. It’s honestly a different sport nowadays than back then.

Racers change their gears on the front sprocket.That's why they run spiders on their crank.You can change the chain ring without removing the crank arm.
The reason cassettes took over street/park bmx is because........









There is no such thing as a nine tooth freewheel.It would be to small to even fit on a flip flop hub.
A few years ago DK (I think) tried to make a 9t freewheel and it didn't work out.

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2/24/2020 3:00 AM

ggallin422 wrote:

why is a cassette better? especially a 16 tooth cassette? i honestly would really like to know some actual facts, not opinions. not sure if your right, b ut they are easier to work on, besides that, they do exactly the same thing, and youd never know the difference by riding it i bet.

readybmxer wrote:

Everyone else is voicing their opinions on this thread too.

I understand some racers still prefer freewheels, but at a certain price point, I think a cassette would be more worth it. Like pursuit said, many of the freewheels from back in the day haven’t been updated, and it sounds like OP isn’t getting into full-fledged competition racing, just putting in some time at a track. Thus, spending money on a cassette versus a top-quality freewheel might be better suited both for his intentions with the bike and possibly monetary-wise.

HavokDJ wrote:

Cassettes are better for freestyle because you aren’t changing gears all the time, but with racing a lot of people switch gear ratios on tracks hence the need for a freewheel (believe me, it’s WAY easier to change a freewheel driver than a cassette driver and plus you have more options). That’s why racing cranks and gears look way different than their freestyle counterparts. It’s honestly a different sport nowadays than back then.

speaking of easier....i dont beleive anyone would rather change a freewheel, then a front sprocket lol. not me...

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2/24/2020 4:32 AM

HavokDJ wrote:

Cassettes are better for freestyle because you aren’t changing gears all the time, but with racing a lot of people switch gear ratios on tracks hence the need for a freewheel (believe me, it’s WAY easier to change a freewheel driver than a cassette driver and plus you have more options). That’s why racing cranks and gears look way different than their freestyle counterparts. It’s honestly a different sport nowadays than back then.

Local track has TONS of people who change both the cassette cog AND the chainrings on the crank to optimize their speed/acceleration, based on how it rides during practice before the races.

As to more options, it's honestly about the same. FW has around 13T through about 19T (odyssey made a 12t, but with all the internals being TINY they exploded a lot). The cost is around 15 for a basic one to 120+ for a "fancy" one. With cassette cogs, they start around 6-8 bucks for basic ones, and go 11T-20T+. You don't get into the 8-9-10T without a one piece driver).

Cassettes are also typically lighter, which is a big thing on the track. From what I've been seeing at the track and shop, freewheel hubs on race bikes are becoming a thing of the past unless you go bare-bones entry-level complete-reliability of a cassette hub is higher than a freewheel nowadays too.

In my shop and wrenching at a track experience, it's faster and easier to change a cassette cog VS chainring. Pull the wheel, toss on the chain whip, loosen lock ring, pop off, new one on, tighten lock ring, wheel back on. Done. No fiddling with 4-5 small bolts and chainring nuts that need a special little wrench etc. As to freewheels, I find the cassette easier as I am not contending with the pedal pressure of the rider tightening it to the hub like you do on a freewheel-which in some cases requires a LOT of force to get it loose.

I've seen people with a literal CD case full of cogs and another case full of labelled chainrings, and chains that correspond with the tooth counts used. Master link on each chain. These folks are the "in it to win it/turn their kid pro" families.

I agree 100% that it is a totally different game out on a track VS what it was back in the day. I've seen parents scream at their kids like they dropped a football in the endzone for a winning TD. Usually the track owners give em the boot for it, which is nice. It's all about fun, and that's what it should be unless the RACER wants to push. Parents who force their KIDS like that make me sick.

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2/25/2020 7:21 AM

readybmxer wrote:

Everyone else is voicing their opinions on this thread too.

I understand some racers still prefer freewheels, but at a certain price point, I think a cassette would be more worth it. Like pursuit said, many of the freewheels from back in the day haven’t been updated, and it sounds like OP isn’t getting into full-fledged competition racing, just putting in some time at a track. Thus, spending money on a cassette versus a top-quality freewheel might be better suited both for his intentions with the bike and possibly monetary-wise.

HavokDJ wrote:

Cassettes are better for freestyle because you aren’t changing gears all the time, but with racing a lot of people switch gear ratios on tracks hence the need for a freewheel (believe me, it’s WAY easier to change a freewheel driver than a cassette driver and plus you have more options). That’s why racing cranks and gears look way different than their freestyle counterparts. It’s honestly a different sport nowadays than back then.

ggallin422 wrote:

speaking of easier....i dont beleive anyone would rather change a freewheel, then a front sprocket lol. not me...

Try rereading that...
Also changing a freewheel is pretty easy if you have the tool for it

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Gave up on BMX to hang out with 13 year old soundcloud rappers, what a life, such a cool guy!
-Sheldon on Adam22

"The only future for BMX"

Yeah, kids getting shit bikes, breaking them and then quitting. LOL
-jbales on mafiaBIKES

I’ve been a 14 year old beginner for the last ten years
-adamnmexican

2/25/2020 10:53 AM

readybmxer wrote:

If you’ll be setting up a race style bike, even more so would you want a cassette. It’ll be much better suited and will be more solid on the track.

You’ll wear out the cassette driver on the track faster than a freewheel because of the tiny bearings in the cassette driver. Free wheels are nice because they’re easy to change and if used in racing they’re going to last longer too because they’re so much bigger than a 9t driver. I agree white industries are solid. If you got a profile hub profile free wheels are solid too

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