Eastern Shovelhead help...

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2/27/2019 12:29 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/27/2019 12:32 PM

So, after a 30 year lay off from BMX, things have changed a little. I ordered the boy a Eastern Shovelhead, which arrived today, and have my bike on back order.

Anyway, I ordered a 2018 Eastern Shovelhead off Ebay for 299.00 shipped for the kid. When I opened it up, it is the black model with the camo seat and camo stickers...so I am thinking it is a 2019 model. Is there any difference between the 2018 and 2019 models besides the camo stickers and seat? I'm not going to go through the trouble of sending it back for the correct model year, unless there was any downgrades to the bike from last years model. *I'm just not a huge camo fan.

Second question, I need to swing by Harbor Freight and pick up some tools to assemble it. Is all the stuff on the new bikes metric...such as the axle bolts, nuts, and are all the allen bolts also metric, as in the stem pinch bold and seat clamp bolt?

And thirdly, what is the correct orientation of the keeper and washer during the from wheel assembly? I have never see an axle like these new bikes have. Out of the box, the axle bolts had a washer and keeper on each side...but on each side, they have the orientation different, so I am unsure where to put each piece.

I also noticed the axle washer has knurling on one side, so I assume it touches the fork dropout?

Hear is a pic as they were sent...

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2/27/2019 12:30 PM



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2/27/2019 12:39 PM

The 2019 is better than the 2018. So don't worry about that.

And hell yeah to Harbor Freight! Love that place! And yeah, all the nuts and bolts will be metric. And if you don't like the camo you can just get another seat (though I personally think the black and camo looks sharp as hell).

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I don't crash, I do random gravity checks...

2/27/2019 12:39 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/27/2019 12:55 PM

Everything should be metric.

What do you mean by keeper? A little washer with a "tang" that locks into the dropout? If that's the case, you can just get rid of them; they serve no real purpose, if the wheel is properly tightened.

The knurled side of the flat washer should go against the dropout, in my opinion, but it has very little, if any effect on anything. The washer is really just there to prevent the axle nut/bolt from gouging or otherwise damaging the dropout.

Edit: I see what you mean now. You can just get rid of the "keepers". I'd also suggest you replace those flat washers with something a little larger(at least as large as the bolt head) as the ones that are on it actually reduce the clamping area and make it more prone to slipping.

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My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
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- Hunter S. Thompson

2/27/2019 12:41 PM

Oh, and both of the spacers go on the outside of the fork dropout. You can take off the spacers with that little nub thing though. As long as you properly tightem your front wheel you won't need those

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I don't crash, I do random gravity checks...

2/27/2019 12:42 PM

p1p1092 wrote:

Everything should be metric.

What do you mean by keeper? A little washer with a "tang" that locks into the dropout? If that's the case, you can just get rid of them; they serve no real purpose, if the wheel is properly tightened.

The knurled side of the flat washer should go against the dropout, in my opinion, but it has very little, if any effect on anything. The washer is really just there to prevent the axle nut/bolt from gouging or otherwise damaging the dropout.

Edit: I see what you mean now. You can just get rid of the "keepers". I'd also suggest you replace those flat washers with something a little larger(at least as large as the bolt head) as the ones that are on it actually reduce the clamping area and make it more prone to slipping.

The "keepers" thing made me lol

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I don't crash, I do random gravity checks...

2/27/2019 1:08 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/27/2019 1:11 PM

Ok...so the order of operation from the inside out is:

the bare aluminum hub flange->inside of dropout->dropout->outside of dropout->washer->bolt head

So there is no washer then between the hub and the inside of the dropout? All I actually need is the single washer that goes between the outer bolt head and the outside of the dropout?

*Ill hunt around for some larger washers at the hardware store. I doubt I will be able to find any with the knurling though.

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2/27/2019 1:21 PM

roja wrote:

Ok...so the order of operation from the inside out is:

the bare aluminum hub flange->inside of dropout->dropout->outside of dropout->washer->bolt head

So there is no washer then between the hub and the inside of the dropout? All I actually need is the single washer that goes between the outer bolt head and the outside of the dropout?

*Ill hunt around for some larger washers at the hardware store. I doubt I will be able to find any with the knurling though.

The flange is the part the of the hubshell with the spoke holes You're actually referring to the cones, but yes:
Cone - Dropout - Washer - Nut/Bolt

You don't really need the knurling; as far I can tell, all it does is prevent the washer from spinning as you tighten the bolt(preventing scratches/paint removal).

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My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
Insta: @p.gibbons

"You can't educate pork"
- grumpySteve

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!""
- Hunter S. Thompson

2/27/2019 1:22 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/27/2019 1:23 PM

roja wrote:

Ok...so the order of operation from the inside out is:

the bare aluminum hub flange->inside of dropout->dropout->outside of dropout->washer->bolt head

So there is no washer then between the hub and the inside of the dropout? All I actually need is the single washer that goes between the outer bolt head and the outside of the dropout?

*Ill hunt around for some larger washers at the hardware store. I doubt I will be able to find any with the knurling though.

That order is correct, yes.

Usually no washer between hub and dropout unless you have a wider frame and narrower hub, which is very unlikely on a complete. Those are usually referred to as cone spacer

The washers with the knurling do help, but instead of that (if you can't find any) you can always just scuff up the dropout our outside washers to give it a little more clamp.

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BMX over 30: Eat clean, Stretch, and Pray.

2/27/2019 3:27 PM

The "keeper" is only added to accommodate forks that can take them, which there are very few forks like that these days. It's supposed to sort of lock the axle into the dropout to prevent it from sliding off the fork, but as p1p said, as long as the wheel it tight there's no use.

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2/27/2019 3:47 PM

what part of WA ?

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2/27/2019 4:06 PM

Oh man! I’m glad to see they still make those. Used to recommend that bike to every n00b who needed a starter bike but didnt wana drop too much cash. 2019 model is spec’d proper too! I also like the colourway. Good stuff!

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2/28/2019 4:41 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/28/2019 7:12 AM

Yeah, I see everything has been covered here already, so I'll just say "CONGRATS" on the return to BMX (hopefully your bike shows up soon!) & also on that KILLER deal on the Shovel! $299 is UNHEARD OF! Awesome! Post some picks in the Bike Check area when you get it built up.

P.S. Not sure it was mentioned but if you don't have one, be sure to grab an extension for your sockets if you are planning on running pegs.

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2/28/2019 7:00 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/28/2019 7:01 AM

pnj wrote:

what part of WA ?

Kennewick area.

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2/28/2019 7:12 AM

Thanks everyone. I called Eastern and talked to "Rob" and he said the 2018 and 2019's were the same except for the color. There are still a few left on Ebay for 299.00.

I got it put together last night and there are some things I really like, and some things I don't like so much. Anyway, so far, I have on order, a new Odyssey brake system, and Merritt grips and pedals.

Here is the issue I am trying to resolve right now...the crank is pretty hard to turn and doesn't spin very free. You can also hear, what sounds like some bearings crunching, at a certain spot during the rotation. I took the chain off to make sure it wasn't a tight spots in the chain, but it is definitely the crank bearings.

So, I want to order some good aftermarket bottom bearings. What is some good stuff? Also, will new bearings of a different brand still be compatible with the factory crank?

Since my kid is still pretty young, I want to drive train to operate easy and efficiently The wheels seem to roll real smooth. I'm not sure about the chain...I'm sure its a cheap one, so I might just go ahead and replace it while I'm at it, but my main concern right now is smoothing out and removing resistance from the crank .

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2/28/2019 7:35 AM

roja wrote:

Thanks everyone. I called Eastern and talked to "Rob" and he said the 2018 and 2019's were the same except for the color. There are still a few left on Ebay for 299.00.

I got it put together last night and there are some things I really like, and some things I don't like so much. Anyway, so far, I have on order, a new Odyssey brake system, and Merritt grips and pedals.

Here is the issue I am trying to resolve right now...the crank is pretty hard to turn and doesn't spin very free. You can also hear, what sounds like some bearings crunching, at a certain spot during the rotation. I took the chain off to make sure it wasn't a tight spots in the chain, but it is definitely the crank bearings.

So, I want to order some good aftermarket bottom bearings. What is some good stuff? Also, will new bearings of a different brand still be compatible with the factory crank?

Since my kid is still pretty young, I want to drive train to operate easy and efficiently The wheels seem to roll real smooth. I'm not sure about the chain...I'm sure its a cheap one, so I might just go ahead and replace it while I'm at it, but my main concern right now is smoothing out and removing resistance from the crank .

Bottom bracket bearings are all pretty much the same these days, with the exception of the various sizes(American, Mid, Spanish and Euro). The Shovelhead should have a Mid BB. Any Mid BB kit should have everything you need.

If you take the cranks off, you can check if the spacer between the bearings is the right length(if it's too short, you can get crunchy bearings and a lot of resistance). It should be the exact width of the distance from bearing to bearing, to prevent the crank preload from crushing the bearings.

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My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
Insta: @p.gibbons

"You can't educate pork"
- grumpySteve

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!""
- Hunter S. Thompson

2/28/2019 7:46 AM

roja wrote:

Thanks everyone. I called Eastern and talked to "Rob" and he said the 2018 and 2019's were the same except for the color. There are still a few left on Ebay for 299.00.

I got it put together last night and there are some things I really like, and some things I don't like so much. Anyway, so far, I have on order, a new Odyssey brake system, and Merritt grips and pedals.

Here is the issue I am trying to resolve right now...the crank is pretty hard to turn and doesn't spin very free. You can also hear, what sounds like some bearings crunching, at a certain spot during the rotation. I took the chain off to make sure it wasn't a tight spots in the chain, but it is definitely the crank bearings.

So, I want to order some good aftermarket bottom bearings. What is some good stuff? Also, will new bearings of a different brand still be compatible with the factory crank?

Since my kid is still pretty young, I want to drive train to operate easy and efficiently The wheels seem to roll real smooth. I'm not sure about the chain...I'm sure its a cheap one, so I might just go ahead and replace it while I'm at it, but my main concern right now is smoothing out and removing resistance from the crank .

p1p1092 wrote:

Bottom bracket bearings are all pretty much the same these days, with the exception of the various sizes(American, Mid, Spanish and Euro). The Shovelhead should have a Mid BB. Any Mid BB kit should have everything you need.

If you take the cranks off, you can check if the spacer between the bearings is the right length(if it's too short, you can get crunchy bearings and a lot of resistance). It should be the exact width of the distance from bearing to bearing, to prevent the crank preload from crushing the bearings.

Yes, I believe it is the Mid bearing system. So, are all bottom bracket tubes the same length? Which should make all the bearing spacers a standard length, or are the all different and you then have to cut the spacer to the desired length?

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2/28/2019 7:54 AM

roja wrote:

Yes, I believe it is the Mid bearing system. So, are all bottom bracket tubes the same length? Which should make all the bearing spacers a standard length, or are the all different and you then have to cut the spacer to the desired length?

There are 2 common lengths(I can't remember them off the top of my head) but they need to be the right length where the bearings can sit all the way into the BB shell(but not too short). I usually put one bearing in, put the tube spacer in, compare it to the width of the bearing shoulders and file the spacer to fit, if needs be.

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My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
Insta: @p.gibbons

"You can't educate pork"
- grumpySteve

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!""
- Hunter S. Thompson

2/28/2019 8:02 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/28/2019 8:02 AM

roja wrote:

Thanks everyone. I called Eastern and talked to "Rob" and he said the 2018 and 2019's were the same except for the color. There are still a few left on Ebay for 299.00.

I got it put together last night and there are some things I really like, and some things I don't like so much. Anyway, so far, I have on order, a new Odyssey brake system, and Merritt grips and pedals.

Here is the issue I am trying to resolve right now...the crank is pretty hard to turn and doesn't spin very free. You can also hear, what sounds like some bearings crunching, at a certain spot during the rotation. I took the chain off to make sure it wasn't a tight spots in the chain, but it is definitely the crank bearings.

So, I want to order some good aftermarket bottom bearings. What is some good stuff? Also, will new bearings of a different brand still be compatible with the factory crank?

Since my kid is still pretty young, I want to drive train to operate easy and efficiently The wheels seem to roll real smooth. I'm not sure about the chain...I'm sure its a cheap one, so I might just go ahead and replace it while I'm at it, but my main concern right now is smoothing out and removing resistance from the crank .

p1p1092 wrote:

Bottom bracket bearings are all pretty much the same these days, with the exception of the various sizes(American, Mid, Spanish and Euro). The Shovelhead should have a Mid BB. Any Mid BB kit should have everything you need.

If you take the cranks off, you can check if the spacer between the bearings is the right length(if it's too short, you can get crunchy bearings and a lot of resistance). It should be the exact width of the distance from bearing to bearing, to prevent the crank preload from crushing the bearings.

roja wrote:

Yes, I believe it is the Mid bearing system. So, are all bottom bracket tubes the same length? Which should make all the bearing spacers a standard length, or are the all different and you then have to cut the spacer to the desired length?

Just make sure you get a 19mm Mid BB. And the chain on the Shovelhead is a KMC 510 which is not a bad chain although mine came with an Odyssey Bluebird which is the same thing.

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2/28/2019 11:57 PM

p1p1092 wrote:

There are 2 common lengths(I can't remember them off the top of my head) but they need to be the right length where the bearings can sit all the way into the BB shell(but not too short). I usually put one bearing in, put the tube spacer in, compare it to the width of the bearing shoulders and file the spacer to fit, if needs be.

The bb spacer that was in my Fit WiFi was 50mm, so I'm assuming that's basically industry standard nowadays

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3/1/2019 8:39 AM

If the bottom bracket spacer is too long or short you can always shave it down or add small spacer which normally come with bb kits

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3/1/2019 8:55 AM

NateBrown62 wrote:

If the bottom bracket spacer is too long or short you can always shave it down or add small spacer which normally come with bb kits

I think I'm just going to take it to the shop and have them do this part of it. Getting a little above my skill and tool levers.

Well, I've ordered enough aftermarket parts for it the last couple days, I should have just bought a premium bike, lol.

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3/1/2019 9:05 AM

sometimes the bearings (and other parts) are installed incorrectly at the factory.

I'd try removing the bearings, greasing the BB shell and reinstalling the bearings. That might fix your issue.

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3/1/2019 9:11 AM

I wouldn't worry about replacing the bb just yet. The bike will need to go through a bedding in period, and pretty much all bearings feel a little stiff when brand new. Just give it a good ride. Anything really out of place will be noticeable on the first ride, other than that, give it a couple of rides, then make sure everything is still tight and snug.

If a bike shop built it, they'd offer a free service at around 6 weeks to 3 months, specifically for a bedding in period.

In the assembly factory, everything is literally just thrown together, so remember to double check every nut and bolt. Sometimes the factory get lazy and don't grease anything too. So you'll want to check that (pretty much anywhere metal comes into contact with metal, bar the stem clamping areas). Especially check the pedal threads, and crank axle, and give em plenty of grease.

Made sure to check the brake and all hardware as it may only be nipped up, and not properly tightened.

And the spokes will probably need a bit of tension after a few rides too.

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3/5/2019 7:12 AM

The Shovelhead is coming along nicely and have a few more parts on order for it still. Yesterday, I received a 27T Sunday Sabretooth sprocket.

My question is, the Sabretooth is noticeably thicker than the Eastern sprocket. To compensate for the extra sprocket thickness of the Sabretooth, do I need to leave out a spacer on the left or right side so the crank arms will go all the way onto the axle, or should it be fine to leave the spacer configuration the way it is?

Here is a pic of the cranks I believe the bike has on it now, and then two additional pictures of my actual bike showing the stock Eastern sprocket and factory spacer configuration.

Thanks


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3/5/2019 7:13 AM


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3/5/2019 7:13 AM


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3/5/2019 7:47 AM

The spacers are there to align the sprocket with the cog on the rear hub, so the chain has a straight travel. Keep/remove spacers accordigly. The cranks will still bolt up properly. ?

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3/5/2019 8:45 AM

About the bottom bracket bearings, as Grumpy stated, it could just be the individual bearings and other surrounding peices mating together. It's also possible during the bearings assembly, a small chunk of something got stuck in the grease and is preventing the bearings from operating smoothly.

If it continues for a long time, I personally would open the troublesome bearing up and clean and regrease it. If you are planning to replace them anyway, there would be no harm in trying to fix it and learning more about bearings for the future.

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3/5/2019 8:51 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/5/2019 8:53 AM

Bulletpup wrote:

About the bottom bracket bearings, as Grumpy stated, it could just be the individual bearings and other surrounding peices mating together. It's also possible during the bearings assembly, a small chunk of something got stuck in the grease and is preventing the bearings from operating smoothly.

If it continues for a long time, I personally would open the troublesome bearing up and clean and regrease it. If you are planning to replace them anyway, there would be no harm in trying to fix it and learning more about bearings for the future.

Thanks. I'm going to have the shop pull it apart to put the new sprocket on and see what they suggest about the bearing issue.

I was just worried about the sprocket being compatible with that crank set since the new sprocket is a lot thicker...and since it is a complete bike, I didn't get any additional or different thickness crank spacers.

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