BMX newbie questions

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11/26/2013 7:52 AM

Hello,
I'm a newbie and I have some questions to ask. Some of my questions maybe stupid to you but I don't have THAT knowledge with bikes. And also, I'm not really good at English I might not explain it clearly enough.

1. When I have pegs, my axle slides in my dropout when I pedal and i loose tension on my chain. What is the proper way of installing a peg? I do it like this cone nut - lock nut - dropouts - pegs - washer - axle nut. Is this right?

2. Is there any way to give tension to my chain without using chain tensioners? Or is there a substitute for a chain tensioner? (I know this one is kinda stupid because I can buy tensioner because they are cheap. But for me it's not! It's expensive for me I am only given Php100 [$2.3] when I have school [i only have 2 days of school per week])

3. I still own a standard chain, and I want my wheels to be slammed on my CS because my CS is long(13.75). I took of pieces from my chain and got the length that would make my wheel slammed. But both ends where different (1 outerplate and 1 inner plate it is supposed to have both inner plate so that the masterlink would work). Can I use a half link chain to connect it?

4. Some of the terms I'm not familiar of... Sometimes when I look at parts for sale there are terms like double butted/multiple butted etc. what does butted mean?

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You say BMX is your life but you barely ride.
BUT hey, That's none of my business.

11/26/2013 8:08 AM

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11/26/2013 8:08 AM

1. Yes. Sounds like it is either not tight enough, there might be axle damage (stripped nut etc) OR the paint on your dropout is allowing it to slip. If you are ok with it, try sanding the paint off the inside of the peg and the dropout where the peg touches. Might help.

2. In the past I have taken a washer that was the same diameter as a peg and cut a notch into it that I bent in, I put that between my axle and the front edge of my dropout to prevent my wheel from slipping. Now I just dial in my chain length so it doesn't have a lot of space. Another option would be just an adapter or something you can put between your axle and front of the dropout to stop the wheel from slipping.

3. Yes, you can use a half link to connect them if they don't quite make it enough to link up.

4. Butted means the thickness of the tubing changes, as in it gets thinner where there is less stress and thicker where there is more stress, creating a lighter tube of material that is just as strong or stronger than even thickness all the way through.

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"Hey anybody ever make that mistake like right when you wake up in the morning and you believe in yourself?" -Kyle Kinane

"BIKES!" -Tom Segura

11/26/2013 8:44 AM

Thanks for answering my question Fondue and dave.
i would sand off the paint on my dropouts and look for someone who has extra piece of a half link chain.

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You say BMX is your life but you barely ride.
BUT hey, That's none of my business.

11/26/2013 9:41 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/26/2013 9:54 AM

I have the washer in between the peg and dropout and I never really have any problems with it.

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11/26/2013 9:44 AM

BMX_Forever wrote:

I have the washer in between the peg and dropout and I never really have any problems with it.

same

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Old bike VVV

California Living

I now have a more or less stock sunday scout with a complete Demo rear wheel. Sue me

11/26/2013 12:04 PM

This looks misleading compared to my original understanding. My understanding was straight gauge is (obviously) same thickness throughout (ex. 2mm) and butted is taking material away from the straight gauge (ex. 2mm on the end and 1mm in the center or other end) and a double or multi butt would just take even more away (ex. 2mm end[s] 0.5mm in the center or other end)

This picture shows that youre adding materials to the ends of the straight gauge, basically like internal gussets.

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Instagram : @timhankinsbmx


11/26/2013 12:20 PM

Fondue wrote: [LINK TO IMAGE]

HardBMX_Tim wrote:

This looks misleading compared to my original understanding. My understanding was straight gauge is (obviously) same thickness throughout (ex. 2mm) and butted is taking material away from the straight gauge (ex. 2mm on the end and 1mm in the center or other end) and a double or multi butt would just take even more away (ex. 2mm end[s] 0.5mm in the center or other end)

This picture shows that youre adding materials to the ends of the straight gauge, basically like internal gussets.

The image is correct, single butting is two different tubing thicknesses, then double butted is 2 or sometimes 3 different thicknesses in 3 areas. Basically wherever there is a change in thickness there is a single bit of butting. Double Butted Tubing very often is thinner than straight gauge tubing in the middle, it's just not what the diagram shows.

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11/26/2013 1:04 PM

Fondue wrote: [LINK TO IMAGE]

HardBMX_Tim wrote:

This looks misleading compared to my original understanding. My understanding was straight gauge is (obviously) same thickness throughout (ex. 2mm) and butted is taking material away from the straight gauge (ex. 2mm on the end and 1mm in the center or other end) and a double or multi butt would just take even more away (ex. 2mm end[s] 0.5mm in the center or other end)

This picture shows that youre adding materials to the ends of the straight gauge, basically like internal gussets.

Tim, I'm pretty sure the image is not to spec. Chill. It's only an illustration of what butting is.

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11/26/2013 1:09 PM

Im not saying its wrong, i was confused as I had a different understanding (which I guess is correct bike tubing-wise). I understand now.

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Refs : SnM An1mal, GThompson121, Chuck8273, blizzbikes, bmxsteve99, kevin.brock.338, zinum, Brian_Griffin, billyhandyjunior, riverM, tomdon
Instagram : @timhankinsbmx


11/26/2013 9:05 PM
Edited Date/Time: 11/26/2013 9:42 PM

Chill guys,

Bmxforever and feeble thanks i might try this.

I have another question
i own a low end bike. It's about 30-33lbs. And im thinking if the cranks made it heavy? I still have a loose ball US BB cranks. Also, my frame is non integ hi ten steel.

If i replace it with a sealed bearing hollow spindle would it make it lighter?

Also, How much tension you put on your chains?

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You say BMX is your life but you barely ride.
BUT hey, That's none of my business.

3/18/2014 12:05 AM

Bump,

What are the frame geometry for a certain bmx discipline?
Example, what is the frame geometry for Street riding? and same goes for trail, park, flatland etc.

So i know what i would look for when I am going to buy a new frame.

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You say BMX is your life but you barely ride.
BUT hey, That's none of my business.

3/18/2014 7:28 AM

2. Yes, pull it

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RIDE OR DIE



THE ROUTER

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3/18/2014 12:05 PM

neophyte16 wrote:

Bump,

What are the frame geometry for a certain bmx discipline?
Example, what is the frame geometry for Street riding? and same goes for trail, park, flatland etc.

So i know what i would look for when I am going to buy a new frame.

Photo

Photo

Flatland frames look different to other frames. The first picture is of a flatland frame and the second is of a frame for other styles of riding. Generally A street frame will be very short and will have a steep headtube whereas a dirt frame will have a mellow headtube and be very long, a park frame will be in between and have a low standover but it all comes down to preference in the end
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3/18/2014 12:49 PM

neophyte16 wrote:

Bump,

What are the frame geometry for a certain bmx discipline?
Example, what is the frame geometry for Street riding? and same goes for trail, park, flatland etc.

So i know what i would look for when I am going to buy a new frame.

street: 13ish cs. 75.0 ht angle

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RIDE OR DIE



THE ROUTER

Instagram: Luislorentebmx

3/18/2014 10:04 PM

So basically,
Dirt/Trail: Longer CS?
Street: Shorter CS?
Flatland: Shorter CS and TT? sometimes smaller standover?
Park: Like flatland frame but with straight tubing and longer TT?

I'm wondering on getting a frame that would suite Flatland and light street riding.
As we dont have dirt and park here.

What would be the best geometry for this kind of riding?
Im 5'9 and will not grow anymore, I think.

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You say BMX is your life but you barely ride.
BUT hey, That's none of my business.

3/19/2014 1:26 AM

The total hangover frame has street/park sort of geometry and it has a tiny standover and would work well for flatland riding I'd say you should get it

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3/19/2014 9:46 PM

Jamie.MacMillan.28 wrote:

The total hangover frame has street/park sort of geometry and it has a tiny standover and would work well for flatland riding I'd say you should get it

yeah, but it's kind of expensive and I don't see totalbmx distributors here.

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You say BMX is your life but you barely ride.
BUT hey, That's none of my business.

3/19/2014 11:11 PM

neophyte16 wrote:

Bump,

What are the frame geometry for a certain bmx discipline?
Example, what is the frame geometry for Street riding? and same goes for trail, park, flatland etc.

So i know what i would look for when I am going to buy a new frame.

There is no certain frame geometry for a certain discipline which is the way a lot of people think and also how complete bike manufacturers advertise their bikes saying it's a "trails" or "street" bike. It's about what's comfortable for you, if you're used to a bike with a 13" chainstay, you can still ride trails even though that length of a chainstay is meant for "street" riding, if you jump on a bike with 14" chainstay and try to ride trails you might not be comfortable on it even though it's supposed to be for "trails". It's all about your preferences.

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3/20/2014 7:14 AM

I see, but what frame geometry would be responsive?
From what i heard and read there are frame geo that is sluggish when doing tricks.

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You say BMX is your life but you barely ride.
BUT hey, That's none of my business.

3/20/2014 7:18 AM

neophyte16 wrote:

I see, but what frame geometry would be responsive?
From what i heard and read there are frame geo that is sluggish when doing tricks.

If you want a responsive frame I'd go with something with a short cs and a 75-75.5 degree headtube

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3/20/2014 7:43 AM

neophyte16 wrote:

I see, but what frame geometry would be responsive?
From what i heard and read there are frame geo that is sluggish when doing tricks.

handlebar-to-face wrote:

If you want a responsive frame I'd go with something with a short cs and a 75-75.5 degree headtube

Thanks! so shorter CS and steeper HT = Responsive.

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You say BMX is your life but you barely ride.
BUT hey, That's none of my business.

3/20/2014 7:48 AM

neophyte16 wrote:

So basically,
Dirt/Trail: Longer CS?
Street: Shorter CS?
Flatland: Shorter CS and TT? sometimes smaller standover?
Park: Like flatland frame but with straight tubing and longer TT?

I'm wondering on getting a frame that would suite Flatland and light street riding.
As we dont have dirt and park here.

What would be the best geometry for this kind of riding?
Im 5'9 and will not grow anymore, I think.

you should go with ft benny l.

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RIDE OR DIE



THE ROUTER

Instagram: Luislorentebmx

3/20/2014 7:48 AM

neophyte16 wrote:

I see, but what frame geometry would be responsive?
From what i heard and read there are frame geo that is sluggish when doing tricks.

handlebar-to-face wrote:

If you want a responsive frame I'd go with something with a short cs and a 75-75.5 degree headtube

neophyte16 wrote:

Thanks! so shorter CS and steeper HT = Responsive.

yes

|

RIDE OR DIE



THE ROUTER

Instagram: Luislorentebmx

3/20/2014 9:36 AM

neophyte16 wrote:

So basically,
Dirt/Trail: Longer CS?
Street: Shorter CS?
Flatland: Shorter CS and TT? sometimes smaller standover?
Park: Like flatland frame but with straight tubing and longer TT?

I'm wondering on getting a frame that would suite Flatland and light street riding.
As we dont have dirt and park here.

What would be the best geometry for this kind of riding?
Im 5'9 and will not grow anymore, I think.

T-rider wrote:

you should go with ft benny l.

I looked for some frames with 20TT and found some that has Short CS..
I am graduating this march and currently looking for a job and when I do get a job I would save up for a frame that would suite me. Thanks for the suggestions.

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You say BMX is your life but you barely ride.
BUT hey, That's none of my business.

3/20/2014 10:33 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/20/2014 10:38 AM

brianoob wrote:

There is no certain frame geometry for a certain discipline which is the way a lot of people think and also how complete bike manufacturers advertise their bikes saying it's a "trails" or "street" bike. It's about what's comfortable for you, if you're used to a bike with a 13" chainstay, you can still ride trails even though that length of a chainstay is meant for "street" riding, if you jump on a bike with 14" chainstay and try to ride trails you might not be comfortable on it even though it's supposed to be for "trails". It's all about your preferences.

This is the truth I am a full on street rider but I prefer the feel of park frames to street frames and also there is an odyssey flatware frame that is basically just a park frame that ypu can get with a very short toptube and the standover is smaller than usual it is probably expensive though but it would fill your needs i think it is called the tango and could you send me links for places you are thinking of buying a frame from I could help with choosing one

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3/20/2014 10:40 AM

neophyte16 wrote:

So basically,
Dirt/Trail: Longer CS?
Street: Shorter CS?
Flatland: Shorter CS and TT? sometimes smaller standover?
Park: Like flatland frame but with straight tubing and longer TT?

I'm wondering on getting a frame that would suite Flatland and light street riding.
As we dont have dirt and park here.

What would be the best geometry for this kind of riding?
Im 5'9 and will not grow anymore, I think.

T-rider wrote:

you should go with ft benny l.

neophyte16 wrote:

I looked for some frames with 20TT and found some that has Short CS..
I am graduating this march and currently looking for a job and when I do get a job I would save up for a frame that would suite me. Thanks for the suggestions.

the fit benny comes in 20inch, has 13.0cs, 75.5 ht angle, 8.25standover and 11.7 bb height.

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RIDE OR DIE



THE ROUTER

Instagram: Luislorentebmx

3/20/2014 7:09 PM

Jamie.MacMillan.28 wrote:

This is the truth I am a full on street rider but I prefer the feel of park frames to street frames and also there is an odyssey flatware frame that is basically just a park frame that ypu can get with a very short toptube and the standover is smaller than usual it is probably expensive though but it would fill your needs i think it is called the tango and could you send me links for places you are thinking of buying a frame from I could help with choosing one

that's my problem though, I don't know where to buy.

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You say BMX is your life but you barely ride.
BUT hey, That's none of my business.

3/20/2014 7:10 PM

T-rider wrote:

the fit benny comes in 20inch, has 13.0cs, 75.5 ht angle, 8.25standover and 11.7 bb height.

I read a lot about this. they say it's a good frame .

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You say BMX is your life but you barely ride.
BUT hey, That's none of my business.

3/20/2014 8:07 PM

if your 5 9 20 inch is gonna be EXTREMELY tight. YOu wont have much room. flatlanders use such short tt's because they spend more time on the pegs and what not and it doesnt matter. If i were you go for atleast 20.5... short and tight but not so tight that you knee your stem just while pedaling.

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