Greasing Threads

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3/7/2017 7:35 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/7/2017 7:37 AM

Is WD40 all good for greasing threads or should you use a specialist bike lube?

Thanks.

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3/7/2017 7:41 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/7/2017 10:40 AM

moranzo wrote:

Is WD40 all good for greasing threads or should you use a specialist bike lube?

Thanks.

You really want grease on actual threads (except for stem bolts--keep reading for why)
WD40 is more of a de-greaser so it's great for cleaning parts off (rust, dirt, old grease, stuff that makes things go "squeak")

On the other hand I will say that one area I have stopped using grease on is stem bolts since they can become easily over tightened and break. WD40 would be my choice on stem bolts

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Dax in NYC
MD & Flatland rider

3/7/2017 7:43 AM

The park tools grease is great (and cheap!) for all around use while the Phil wood is wonderful inside of wheels (ie greasing the clutch threads on your freecoaster)

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Dax in NYC
MD & Flatland rider

3/7/2017 7:47 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/7/2017 7:48 AM

No. Just use plain old automotive grease or anti-seize from your local Walmart or auto parts store. Also, WD-40 is not a lubricant, it is a penetrating oil. When used on a chain or likewise, it actually attracts dirt and is worse than having no grease at all, so never use WD-40 on your bike unless its for its specific purpose- a penetrating oil. In reality, you really don't need a bike specific lube, as for 99.99% of applications, a plain automotive white lithium/ wheel bearing grease works just as well. I mean, I you have the money, then why not, but you can get 2x the grease for half the price when using plain old automotive grease.

Hope this helps smile feel free to ask anymore questions!

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"haha, did you steal that bike? hurhrhrurhurr" "no, fuck you thats just the brand."

3/7/2017 7:56 AM

owen.lox wrote:

No. Just use plain old automotive grease or anti-seize from your local Walmart or auto parts store. Also, WD-40 is not a lubricant, it is a penetrating oil. When used on a chain or likewise, it actually attracts dirt and is worse than having no grease at all, so never use WD-40 on your bike unless its for its specific purpose- a penetrating oil. In reality, you really don't need a bike specific lube, as for 99.99% of applications, a plain automotive white lithium/ wheel bearing grease works just as well. I mean, I you have the money, then why not, but you can get 2x the grease for half the price when using plain old automotive grease.

Hope this helps smile feel free to ask anymore questions!

Ahh right okay, thanks for the help. I will get some standard grease. Putting my first proper complete together tonight so want to make sure it's all done properly.

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3/7/2017 7:59 AM

moranzo wrote:

Ahh right okay, thanks for the help. I will get some standard grease. Putting my first proper complete together tonight so want to make sure it's all done properly.

good luck!

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"haha, did you steal that bike? hurhrhrurhurr" "no, fuck you thats just the brand."

3/7/2017 9:32 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/7/2017 9:36 AM

Wd40 is not grease! It's not even oil. Wd40 is only good for lubing a chain or putting on grips. Works perfectly well on a chain, and will attract much less dirt than any oil, or grease.
It's penetrating lubrication, it is a degreaser. Removes grease.

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3/7/2017 9:39 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/7/2017 9:42 AM

ggallin422 wrote:

Wd40 is not grease! It's not even oil. Wd40 is only good for lubing a chain or putting on grips. Works perfectly well on a chain, and will attract much less dirt than any oil, or grease.
It's penetrating lubrication, it is a degreaser. Removes grease.

I disagree, WD-40 should be a last resort for your chain. I personally wouldn't ever use it for grips. I use zipties, air, hair spary, or spraypaint. WD-40 sounds like a recipie for throttle grip.

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"haha, did you steal that bike? hurhrhrurhurr" "no, fuck you thats just the brand."

3/7/2017 10:08 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/7/2017 10:38 AM

Metalbmxer wrote:

You really want grease on actual threads (except for stem bolts--keep reading for why)
WD40 is more of a de-greaser so it's great for cleaning parts off (rust, dirt, old grease, stuff that makes things go "squeak")

On the other hand I will say that one area I have stopped using grease on is stem bolts since they can become easily over tightened and break. WD40 would be my choice on stem bolts

If using a grease is causing you to break bolts, you're doing something wrong. I've used aluminium, Ti, 4130 and stainless bolts in the past with either anti-seize or whatever grease I had laying around and I've never broken a bolt. Sure, it allows you to tighten a little more but the only way I can see a bolt snapping is a manufacturing defect or using a cheater bar to put far too much torque on your on your allen key. If you're applying that amount of torque to your bolts, it doesn't matter whether or not you use grease on the threads, you'll snap them or damage your stem anyways. A stem faceplate will snap long before a bolt unless the bolt is too long and bottoms out in the hole. The back of a stem will do something very similar.

By that logic, we shouldn't grease anything because we'll start snapping all of our axles and bolts when we tighten them. That's completely absurd!

Grease your bolts, don't use a cheater bar on them and they will last a very long time. I don't know what a stem should be tightened to but if I remember correctly, a 1/4" bolt tightened to 75in/lbs(8.5 Nm) has a clamping force of something like 1500lbs! There's no need to go crazy on torquing them.

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My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
Insta: @p.gibbons

"You can't educate pork"
- grumpySteve

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!""
- Hunter S. Thompson

3/7/2017 10:16 AM

ggallin422 wrote:

Wd40 is not grease! It's not even oil. Wd40 is only good for lubing a chain or putting on grips. Works perfectly well on a chain, and will attract much less dirt than any oil, or grease.
It's penetrating lubrication, it is a degreaser. Removes grease.

WD-40 shouldn't be put anywhere near a chain, it picks up far more crap than any actual chain lube I've ever used! Go ask somebody in your local bike shop, they deal with people using WD-40 as chain lube all the time.

I don't know about using it to put grips on but I'll be trying it out when I put on my next pair.

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My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
Insta: @p.gibbons

"You can't educate pork"
- grumpySteve

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!""
- Hunter S. Thompson

3/7/2017 10:38 AM

p1p1092 wrote:

If using a grease is causing you to break bolts, you're doing something wrong. I've used aluminium, Ti, 4130 and stainless bolts in the past with either anti-seize or whatever grease I had laying around and I've never broken a bolt. Sure, it allows you to tighten a little more but the only way I can see a bolt snapping is a manufacturing defect or using a cheater bar to put far too much torque on your on your allen key. If you're applying that amount of torque to your bolts, it doesn't matter whether or not you use grease on the threads, you'll snap them or damage your stem anyways. A stem faceplate will snap long before a bolt unless the bolt is too long and bottoms out in the hole. The back of a stem will do something very similar.

By that logic, we shouldn't grease anything because we'll start snapping all of our axles and bolts when we tighten them. That's completely absurd!

Grease your bolts, don't use a cheater bar on them and they will last a very long time. I don't know what a stem should be tightened to but if I remember correctly, a 1/4" bolt tightened to 75in/lbs(8.5 Nm) has a clamping force of something like 1500lbs! There's no need to go crazy on torquing them.

All of these.

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3/7/2017 10:44 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/7/2017 10:48 AM

I deal with wd40 used on chains almost daily. It will take any oil off the chain, so the chain will rust a ton quicker (I've seen literally hundreds of 3 month old bikes with rusty chains). I've also had to deal with customers who put it on their brakes to stop them squeeking!

You should use anti seize grease (like copper, white lithium grease) on threads. But try to steer clear of using it on bearings. It's a lot harsher than any poly lube and can cause your bearings to wear faster. Plus it can be displaced by water easier (especially the white lithium grease. It's actually shit for pretty much everything on a bike). Whereas a poly lube can be used for everything.

The park tools grease is freakin awesome, I'd heavily recommend it for everything. One tube should still last you years if you don't go over the top with it

As for torque of a stem bolt, around 12Nm is plenty. I believe odyssey have stated up to 15Nm on some of their stems, which is about as tight as you can get with a regular length Allen key without struggling too much

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3/7/2017 10:46 AM

p1p1092 wrote:

If using a grease is causing you to break bolts, you're doing something wrong. I've used aluminium, Ti, 4130 and stainless bolts in the past with either anti-seize or whatever grease I had laying around and I've never broken a bolt. Sure, it allows you to tighten a little more but the only way I can see a bolt snapping is a manufacturing defect or using a cheater bar to put far too much torque on your on your allen key. If you're applying that amount of torque to your bolts, it doesn't matter whether or not you use grease on the threads, you'll snap them or damage your stem anyways. A stem faceplate will snap long before a bolt unless the bolt is too long and bottoms out in the hole. The back of a stem will do something very similar.

By that logic, we shouldn't grease anything because we'll start snapping all of our axles and bolts when we tighten them. That's completely absurd!

Grease your bolts, don't use a cheater bar on them and they will last a very long time. I don't know what a stem should be tightened to but if I remember correctly, a 1/4" bolt tightened to 75in/lbs(8.5 Nm) has a clamping force of something like 1500lbs! There's no need to go crazy on torquing them.

I don't know I've been riding over 15 years and have learned the right amount to tighten bolts. And the only bolts I have really had problems with were stem bolts snapping--both Ti and Cromo bolts. Granted this was when I was doing lots of bunny hop tailwhips and running my tires at 140 psi (I ride pro flatland).

Now I heard that a few years back madera/profile had some problems with the heat treating on their steel bolts. And that this may have been the cause of it but I broke a few Blue6 Ti bolts as well. Never had any problems with the faceplate breaking or the stem pinching tho.....So in general I think the stem is the easiest thing to overtighten and grease just makes it easier to make that mistake. Oh yeah never used a cheater bar either

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Dax in NYC
MD & Flatland rider

3/7/2017 10:49 AM

grumpySteve wrote:

I deal with wd40 used on chains almost daily. It will take any oil off the chain, so the chain will rust a ton quicker (I've seen literally hundreds of 3 month old bikes with rusty chains). I've also had to deal with customers who put it on their brakes to stop them squeeking!

You should use anti seize grease (like copper, white lithium grease) on threads. But try to steer clear of using it on bearings. It's a lot harsher than any poly lube and can cause your bearings to wear faster. Plus it can be displaced by water easier (especially the white lithium grease. It's actually shit for pretty much everything on a bike). Whereas a poly lube can be used for everything.

The park tools grease is freakin awesome, I'd heavily recommend it for everything. One tube should still last you years if you don't go over the top with it

As for torque of a stem bolt, around 12Nm is plenty. I believe odyssey have stated up to 15Nm on some of their stems, which is about as tight as you can get with a regular length Allen key without struggling too much

All of this!

|

My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
Insta: @p.gibbons

"You can't educate pork"
- grumpySteve

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!""
- Hunter S. Thompson

3/7/2017 11:08 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/7/2017 11:40 AM

Metalbmxer wrote:

I don't know I've been riding over 15 years and have learned the right amount to tighten bolts. And the only bolts I have really had problems with were stem bolts snapping--both Ti and Cromo bolts. Granted this was when I was doing lots of bunny hop tailwhips and running my tires at 140 psi (I ride pro flatland).

Now I heard that a few years back madera/profile had some problems with the heat treating on their steel bolts. And that this may have been the cause of it but I broke a few Blue6 Ti bolts as well. Never had any problems with the faceplate breaking or the stem pinching tho.....So in general I think the stem is the easiest thing to overtighten and grease just makes it easier to make that mistake. Oh yeah never used a cheater bar either

I do a lot of flat tailwhips, 180 tailwhips and 540s and I run 90psi, still never snapped a bolt.

I hadn't heard about that, if they weren't tempered right, that'd make sense. I've no idea about Blue6 stuff, I've always used TLC Ti bolts or any random ones I came across. Greasing bolts doesn't make it that much easier, you'll still end up putting the same amount of torque(if not more) on the bolts without grease but it won't clamp as hard. For example, a rough, rusted up bolt could take the same torque but it could clamp as much as 500-1000 lbs less! In order to get the same clamping force, you'd need to put a considerable amount more torque on the bolt and could probably break the bolt before achieving the same clamping force. As long as you're not going crazy on the torque, grease is fine.

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My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
Insta: @p.gibbons

"You can't educate pork"
- grumpySteve

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!""
- Hunter S. Thompson