Headset is creaking

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8/9/2012 3:07 PM

So my headset on my bike i just got is creaking. Does anyone kno what could be wrong if so can u please help. Thanks

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Dirt & street everyday

8/9/2012 3:12 PM

what color is it? if its red, red ones are known to creak

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8/9/2012 3:12 PM

Its all good. Nothing wrong. Just gotta break it in. Or you made need some grease or what happens to me is that the bearings pop out and you gotta close it again but since ints new it prolly needs to be broken in.

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" When life gives you lemons, take out your dick and swing it around your head like a cowboy "

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8/9/2012 3:16 PM

k. could it be its to tight?

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Dirt & street everyday

8/9/2012 3:38 PM

G-Rollers BMX wrote:

k. could it be its to tight?

no, if it creaks it needs grease.

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8/9/2012 3:47 PM

k thanks

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Dirt & street everyday

8/9/2012 4:02 PM

G-Rollers BMX wrote:

k. could it be its to tight?

Me? wrote:

no, if it creaks it needs grease.

Where exactly do you put the grease? Like in the cups, all over the bearings, or both?

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8/9/2012 4:16 PM

G-Rollers BMX wrote:

k. could it be its to tight?

Me? wrote:

no, if it creaks it needs grease.

isnowyaznV2 wrote:

Where exactly do you put the grease? Like in the cups, all over the bearings, or both?

Bearings. Anything really that has metal on metal contact.

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" When life gives you lemons, take out your dick and swing it around your head like a cowboy "

- BmxKitten

8/9/2012 4:19 PM

Me? wrote:

no, if it creaks it needs grease.

isnowyaznV2 wrote:

Where exactly do you put the grease? Like in the cups, all over the bearings, or both?

BmxKitten wrote:

Bearings. Anything really that has metal on metal contact.

To be totally honest, I HATE grease. I run absolutely no grease on anything at all unless somebody put it on for me and I can't clean it all out. The only thing I have grease in is my hubs. Thats pretty much about it. I might get a new chain or chain lubricant cause my sprocket, driver, and chain has absolutely no grease and it creaks like shit when I pedal..

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Bought from: adam1234, tomdon (2), oscarbmx, the balt, smokesmokesmoke

8/9/2012 4:23 PM

Just don't grease the part where the stem goes on the shaft haha

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8/9/2012 4:26 PM

Derek_Bolz wrote:

Just don't grease the part where the stem goes on the shaft haha

Wow.. Whoever greases the knurling on the bar, the inside of a stem, or the outside of the steerer tube on the fork, they're a dumbass. xD

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3/4/2018 3:57 AM

I got hole new bike and it’s does it killabee with s&m forks kink ti headset , snafu stem ti bolts and it creaks

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3/4/2018 4:08 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/4/2018 4:08 AM

clarkwesty wrote:

I got hole new bike and it’s does it killabee with s&m forks kink ti headset , snafu stem ti bolts and it creaks

Just wait 6 years someone will answer you then

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Hmmm

3/4/2018 4:08 AM

clarkwesty wrote:

I got hole new bike and it’s does it killabee with s&m forks kink ti headset , snafu stem ti bolts and it creaks

Use copper grease on the ti bolts. Put grease between the cups/bearings/races. Make sure your headset is tightened enough. Creaking is an indication of movement where it's not wanted

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3/4/2018 6:17 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/4/2018 6:21 AM

I know this is an old thread but If you watch Spencer Forsman build up his bike he greases his steerer tube where the stem clamps it...lol

Heres the link



@10:15
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3/4/2018 6:22 AM

Bulletpup wrote:

I know this is an old thread but If you watch Spencer Forsman build up his bike he greases his steerer tube where the stem clamps it...lol

Heres the link



@10:15

Yeah I remember that lollaughing

I'm going to be completely honest, I put a LIGHT coast of grease, VERY LIGHT coat. It makes me feel better for some reason....

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3/4/2018 8:53 AM

Bulletpup wrote:

I know this is an old thread but If you watch Spencer Forsman build up his bike he greases his steerer tube where the stem clamps it...lol

Heres the link



@10:15

HondaCRFRacer wrote:

Yeah I remember that lollaughing

I'm going to be completely honest, I put a LIGHT coast of grease, VERY LIGHT coat. It makes me feel better for some reason....

Honestly, if Spencer doesnt have any problems coating it with grease it might just be a myth. I have never actually tested it myself...

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3/4/2018 9:35 AM

Bulletpup wrote:

I know this is an old thread but If you watch Spencer Forsman build up his bike he greases his steerer tube where the stem clamps it...lol

Heres the link



@10:15

HondaCRFRacer wrote:

Yeah I remember that lollaughing

I'm going to be completely honest, I put a LIGHT coast of grease, VERY LIGHT coat. It makes me feel better for some reason....

Bulletpup wrote:

Honestly, if Spencer doesnt have any problems coating it with grease it might just be a myth. I have never actually tested it myself...

I never have tried it myself, either, but we put grease on the seat post/seat tube area & it rarely slips unless it's hit hard. Of course, it is rarely under the same sort of stress that a stem is.

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3/4/2018 11:10 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/5/2018 2:26 AM

Mishinn_Control wrote:

I never have tried it myself, either, but we put grease on the seat post/seat tube area & it rarely slips unless it's hit hard. Of course, it is rarely under the same sort of stress that a stem is.

The grease in the case of the seatpost isn't really there for the clamping area; it's there for the rest of the seatpost, to prevent it from corroding and seizing to the inside of the frame while it's vibrating and flexing against the seatpost. It also provides a seal which stops water from running down around the seatpost and into the BB.

The stem is extremely unlikely to ever seize due to galvanic corrosion because the clamping surface is pretty much entirely sealed. Even if it could seize, it'd release immediately when the stem is loosened.

EDIT: Just realised I was referring to galvanic corrosion as cold welding, similar result but the process is a bit different. Cold welding will occur as well but not to the same degree, usually.

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3/4/2018 11:27 AM

p1p1092 wrote:

The grease in the case of the seatpost isn't really there for the clamping area; it's there for the rest of the seatpost, to prevent it from corroding and seizing to the inside of the frame while it's vibrating and flexing against the seatpost. It also provides a seal which stops water from running down around the seatpost and into the BB.

The stem is extremely unlikely to ever seize due to galvanic corrosion because the clamping surface is pretty much entirely sealed. Even if it could seize, it'd release immediately when the stem is loosened.

EDIT: Just realised I was referring to galvanic corrosion as cold welding, similar result but the process is a bit different. Cold welding will occur as well but not to the same degree, usually.

Never knew cold welding was a thing, the more ya know!!!

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3/4/2018 2:40 PM

DanTheBikerMan wrote:

Never knew cold welding was a thing, the more ya know!!!

It's actually a pretty interesting subject if you're into engineering and metalworking. It's a massive design factor in anything with moving parts, anything that may vibrate in operation and anything that would stop and start repeatedly. Basically, when two parts are moving against each other, they lap together and eventually end up with perfect mating surfaces with no oxides or oils between them which allows the material of the two parts to bond together when they eventually stop moving. It's not exactly a strong "weld" but if the equipment goes unchecked long enough, it can be more than enough to cause a problem/ruin a part, eg. seized bolts.

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My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
Insta: @p.gibbons

"You can't educate pork"
- grumpySteve

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!""
- Hunter S. Thompson

3/4/2018 3:43 PM

p1p1092 wrote:

The grease in the case of the seatpost isn't really there for the clamping area; it's there for the rest of the seatpost, to prevent it from corroding and seizing to the inside of the frame while it's vibrating and flexing against the seatpost. It also provides a seal which stops water from running down around the seatpost and into the BB.

The stem is extremely unlikely to ever seize due to galvanic corrosion because the clamping surface is pretty much entirely sealed. Even if it could seize, it'd release immediately when the stem is loosened.

EDIT: Just realised I was referring to galvanic corrosion as cold welding, similar result but the process is a bit different. Cold welding will occur as well but not to the same degree, usually.

DanTheBikerMan wrote:

Never knew cold welding was a thing, the more ya know!!!

p1p1092 wrote:

It's actually a pretty interesting subject if you're into engineering and metalworking. It's a massive design factor in anything with moving parts, anything that may vibrate in operation and anything that would stop and start repeatedly. Basically, when two parts are moving against each other, they lap together and eventually end up with perfect mating surfaces with no oxides or oils between them which allows the material of the two parts to bond together when they eventually stop moving. It's not exactly a strong "weld" but if the equipment goes unchecked long enough, it can be more than enough to cause a problem/ruin a part, eg. seized bolts.

I was under the impression that siezed seat posts were because the alu oxidised and kind of fused to the steel?

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Hmmm

3/4/2018 4:15 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/4/2018 4:28 PM

Edman123 wrote:

I was under the impression that siezed seat posts were because the alu oxidised and kind of fused to the steel?

Aluminium oxidises the moment it's exposed to oxygen, it's just so thin that you can't see it. The oxide is extremely hard(it's used in grinding wheels) but you can still wear through it/chip it off. As far as I remember, from reading a book on the subject a few years ago, it's a difference in the charge of the 2 metals, kinda like, they electroplate to each other. You do need an electrolyte, eg. saltwater on the 2 surfaces in order for it to happen though.

EDIT: Here's a pretty good page about galvanic corrosion: Link
EDIT 2: Here's a pretty good video about cold-welding:

">Link
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My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
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"You can't educate pork"
- grumpySteve

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!""
- Hunter S. Thompson

3/4/2018 10:24 PM

p1p1092 wrote:

The grease in the case of the seatpost isn't really there for the clamping area; it's there for the rest of the seatpost, to prevent it from corroding and seizing to the inside of the frame while it's vibrating and flexing against the seatpost. It also provides a seal which stops water from running down around the seatpost and into the BB.

The stem is extremely unlikely to ever seize due to galvanic corrosion because the clamping surface is pretty much entirely sealed. Even if it could seize, it'd release immediately when the stem is loosened.

EDIT: Just realised I was referring to galvanic corrosion as cold welding, similar result but the process is a bit different. Cold welding will occur as well but not to the same degree, usually.

that's neat, I never thought of it in depth like that. Obviously I know the clamp only clamps the post at one spot but I never thought about how there's a tiny empty space in between the seat post and seat tube unlike the steerer tube & stem since that clamps all the way around it.

but yeah I also grease my seat post too for that exact reason(well that and I run a wedge post). Some people think it's odd, but when/if I need to pull my seat post out, it slides right out instead of having to fight it.

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