Help taking apart a cassette hub

Related:
Create New Tag

12/17/2019 8:51 PM

I got a cassette hub here and How Can I take it apart in order to swap out old bearings


|

12/17/2019 10:11 PM

What hub is it?

|

12/17/2019 10:16 PM

|

12/17/2019 10:24 PM

Is that the weird haro hub from the completes? They had a sealed bearing driver side and the non-drive side was a cone and loose ball?

|

12/17/2019 10:25 PM
Edited Date/Time: 12/17/2019 10:26 PM

">]


This video should do the trick
|

12/18/2019 12:18 AM

^that video's only for fully sealed hubs, and also not that it matters for this conversation but that is definitely not a Match hub, it's a stock Cult hub.

to take apart an semi-sealed hub you'll need cone wrenches to undo the jam nuts, they're usually very tightly jammed against each other. Be very careful and take precautions for ball bearings to potentially drop out and all over the floor. I like to start with the driver side, so remove both jam nuts on the driver side and be careful not to pull any of the balls out when doing so just yet, and if you do, keep them together/don't lose any. this will be important when putting it back together and finding the correct sized new ones. A magnet is very helpful for the next step, just take one to the balls and they should all jump up onto the magnet and you can take them off to put them somewhere they won't roll away.


next, remove the driver but be careful as the balls on the inside of the driver can fall out when you do this. just slide the driver out, and do the same with the balls but keep these separate from the ones you already took out. Now you should see the sealed bearing in there and we can move onto the next step which is the other side of the axle. do the same with the jam nuts on that side, and remove the balls. they're usually bigger but for simplicity's sake just keep them separate.


now here's where things can get tricky, a lot of semi-sealed hubs I've worked on have been rather odd and had a funny design to them (namely Mission hubs) where the sealed bearing would be built onto the axle or even into the hubshell itself and required a special tool (one time we had to MAKE a tool for this) so unless the sealed bearing feels really shitty, I would just skip it and not worry about it. but if you're feeling up to it, try. I forget what design specifically the Mission hubs use, but I remember the axle just slides out then you need a really odd ball sized allen wrench to unscrew a piece inside of the hub, which will then let the bearing loose. then just simply replace it (with the right size of course, the numbers are written on the seal) and tighten the piece back up. it's easier said than done as these are usually VERY fucking tight.


or, sometimes (in most cases) the axle needs tapped out from the driver size (hit the driver side of the axle) and then you'll see the sealed bearing followed by a long spacer, then a cone nut. remove the cone nut and the spacer and bearing will slide off, then replace it accordingly, and put it back together. next, tap the axle with the new bearing back in but be careful it goes in straight or you risk damaging it. once it's properly seated, you can move onto putting the new ball bearings in. you need to be 100% sure you have the same size and quantity you had to begin with or it won't work, or will feel like absolute shit.


I like to put a coat of grease in the bearing seats, starting with the non-drive size, and put the balls in 1 by 1. do this until you've put all the non-drive side balls in, then thread the jam nuts back on and adjust this side (you want it tight enough that there's no slop, but not so tight that it doesn't wanna roll or feels like it has too much resistance). once you've done that, move onto the drive side. again put grease all in the bearing seats of the driver, it'll make it a lot easier. line it with grease and put the balls in on both sides (again making sure the size & quantity are the same as the ones that were in before) then carefully dab a bit of grease on the surface of the balls to make sure they stay put and don't fall out when you slide the driver back in. So slide the driver back in, and make sure it's seated properly, then thread the jam nuts on and adjust them. this time, you just want the driver to be able to spin without much resistance but also no terrible slop.


and there you go

|

12/18/2019 6:09 AM

I believe this came from a haro boulevard and I looked it up and it’s supposedly a sealed cassette hub. I question was on the axle because I see high end hubs having like a 6mm Allen insert to remove then nuts when this dosent

|

12/18/2019 6:20 AM

take it to your local bike shop

|

fack off

12/18/2019 6:34 AM

_bmxican_ wrote:

I believe this came from a haro boulevard and I looked it up and it’s supposedly a sealed cassette hub. I question was on the axle because I see high end hubs having like a 6mm Allen insert to remove then nuts when this dosent

Only hubs with inbound/female axles will have bolts broached for 6mm

|

12/18/2019 6:38 AM

_bmxican_ wrote:

I believe this came from a haro boulevard and I looked it up and it’s supposedly a sealed cassette hub. I question was on the axle because I see high end hubs having like a 6mm Allen insert to remove then nuts when this dosent

HtownGetDown wrote:

Only hubs with inbound/female axles will have bolts broached for 6mm

Plenty of male hubs have Allen broaches at the end of the axle actually

|




Refs : SnM An1mal, GThompson121, Chuck8273, blizzbikes, bmxsteve99, kevin.brock.338, zinum, Brian_Griffin, billyhandyjunior, riverM, tomdon
Instagram : @timhankinsbmx


12/18/2019 6:40 AM
Edited Date/Time: 12/18/2019 6:44 AM

_bmxican_ wrote:

I believe this came from a haro boulevard and I looked it up and it’s supposedly a sealed cassette hub. I question was on the axle because I see high end hubs having like a 6mm Allen insert to remove then nuts when this dosent

HtownGetDown wrote:

Only hubs with inbound/female axles will have bolts broached for 6mm

HardBMX_Tim wrote:

Plenty of male hubs have Allen broaches at the end of the axle actually

He said nuts

Edit:

I reread his post and kind of understand what he's getting at

|

12/18/2019 6:41 AM

HtownGetDown wrote:

Only hubs with inbound/female axles will have bolts broached for 6mm

HardBMX_Tim wrote:

Plenty of male hubs have Allen broaches at the end of the axle actually

HtownGetDown wrote:

He said nuts

Edit:

I reread his post and kind of understand what he's getting at

Where? Lol

|




Refs : SnM An1mal, GThompson121, Chuck8273, blizzbikes, bmxsteve99, kevin.brock.338, zinum, Brian_Griffin, billyhandyjunior, riverM, tomdon
Instagram : @timhankinsbmx


12/18/2019 6:46 AM

HardBMX_Tim wrote:

Plenty of male hubs have Allen broaches at the end of the axle actually

HtownGetDown wrote:

He said nuts

Edit:

I reread his post and kind of understand what he's getting at

HardBMX_Tim wrote:

Where? Lol

I edited that immediately. He said to help remove nuts, and my brain disregarded the "to help remove" part on my first read through

|

12/18/2019 11:46 AM

_bmxican_ wrote:

I believe this came from a haro boulevard and I looked it up and it’s supposedly a sealed cassette hub. I question was on the axle because I see high end hubs having like a 6mm Allen insert to remove then nuts when this dosent

Depending on the year, it’s semi sealed 100%. Trust me, I just put together a bunch of those bikes at the shop I work at. The catalog itself even said “sealed hubs” but they’re listed wrong for some reason

double check it though, a sealed bearing is very distinct from an unsealed one and typically unsealed ones have a big fat rubber seal on the non-drive side that you can see looking in, and the driver side will have a smaller rubber seal that goes partially around the edge of the driver


and yeah most high end hubs do have an allen insert, but this one doesn’t seem to be that high end especially if it’s a semi-sealed

|

12/18/2019 1:38 PM

Take a photo every time you take one thing off, then use the photos in reverse to put it back together, that’ll help a little.

|

Scooter kid trying to ride a bike. Instagram: @scootereyn // YouTube: Reyn Honbo - RH MEDIA

12/18/2019 2:07 PM

readybmxer wrote:

Take a photo every time you take one thing off, then use the photos in reverse to put it back together, that’ll help a little.

Best advice ever. Use this whenever you tackle anything mechanical

|