Looking for bars w/ the longest grip area

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3/7/2020 8:27 AM

This is a tough, specific search, so there may not be a perfect solution. Still figured I'd make a post.

Please post model names of handlebars that have the widest grip area with the dimensions below. Grip area (flat area before the bend) doesn't seem to be a standard dimension provided in the specs from most companies.

9.5" tall
30" wide
4˚ upsweep
12˚ backsweep

Tree Moto Bars fit these specs exactly, and in fact they're my favorite bars. But the grip area isn't long enough to fit a brake lever in the position I like, even with a one-finger lever (I like the lever way over from the grip... 1.5" or so, so I can just barely grab it with my index). Obviously when the brake lever is placed on the handlebar bend it becomes angled in a way that is weird and ineffective.

BRAKE LEVER NEUROSIS POST OVER. Thanks in advance.


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3/7/2020 9:15 AM

How big are your friggin grips that you’d have to put the brake levers on the bends? Longneck XL’s? Those bars are like 3” wider than my intrikat 9’s and have plenty of room.

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3/7/2020 9:37 AM

I run Broc Raiford grips (160 mm).

Wide bars don't necessarily correlate directly to grip area length. On the Tree Moto Bars the crossbar is super wide which makes for a relatively small grip area.

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3/7/2020 10:17 AM

Easiest solution is cutting the bars, but you want 30” wide?

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3/7/2020 1:18 PM

arewolfe wrote:

I run Broc Raiford grips (160 mm).

Wide bars don't necessarily correlate directly to grip area length. On the Tree Moto Bars the crossbar is super wide which makes for a relatively small grip area.

Man your bars are possibly intended to be run on brakeless setups. I can’t see why they’d be so small that you can’t put levers in the proper area.

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Gave up on BMX to hang out with 13 year old soundcloud rappers, what a life, such a cool guy!
-Sheldon on Adam22

"The only future for BMX"

Yeah, kids getting shit bikes, breaking them and then quitting. LOL
-jbales on mafiaBIKES

I’ve been a 14 year old beginner for the last ten years
-adamnmexican

3/8/2020 10:14 PM

Cut the grip to length or get new grips, signature grips are made the way the pros want them and if a pro is brakeless and does a lot of barspins then odds are they are going to have a large grip with no flange and no intention of leaving space for a brake lever

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3/9/2020 4:48 AM

Bring back 2003. Buy a dirt Harry lever and run it on the bend.

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3/9/2020 5:52 AM

I've had the same brake lever problem. Ended up just cutting the grips. Some grip designs you can't even notice, others look weird. Cutting clean cuts isn't real easy either.

I think the reason they are getting designed this way is for strength. But it would be nice if I could trim the bars a bit more and use slightly longer grips.

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3/9/2020 6:32 AM
Edited Date/Time: 3/9/2020 6:33 AM

Thanks guys. The brakeless feel is exactly my problem: that's the feel I want. I run brakeless 95% of the time because I ride street, park, and small trails, and I ride the inner 1/3 of the grip. My 2nd rig for trails needs a brake because some of the lines we're building are too big /sketch for me to ride brakeless. Legit ass 1st world problems.

So the feel I'm looking for is that brakeless feel (wide grips) but with a lever about 1.5" away from the grip. I may not be able to find a wide enough grip area on any bar, as someone mentioned, since wide crossbars are intentionally used to create stronger bars. There probably just aren't any bars that have 250mm of non-bent grip area.

The solution is probably to cut 40-50 mm off the outside of the grips with scissors before installing... That may end up being the only way to achieve the feel I'm looking for.

Thanks again.

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3/9/2020 7:07 AM

arewolfe wrote:

Thanks guys. The brakeless feel is exactly my problem: that's the feel I want. I run brakeless 95% of the time because I ride street, park, and small trails, and I ride the inner 1/3 of the grip. My 2nd rig for trails needs a brake because some of the lines we're building are too big /sketch for me to ride brakeless. Legit ass 1st world problems.

So the feel I'm looking for is that brakeless feel (wide grips) but with a lever about 1.5" away from the grip. I may not be able to find a wide enough grip area on any bar, as someone mentioned, since wide crossbars are intentionally used to create stronger bars. There probably just aren't any bars that have 250mm of non-bent grip area.

The solution is probably to cut 40-50 mm off the outside of the grips with scissors before installing... That may end up being the only way to achieve the feel I'm looking for.

Thanks again.

Look into the total killabee k3 bars. I run them. Not the exact specs but they come wide. And have lots of grip area. I personally cut mine down to 27. I put my odyssey medium lever on the bend and take a wrench and bend it and grip the end of my bars. Probably have a similar position as what you want.

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3/11/2020 10:56 AM

longer grip area creates a longer/stronger 'moment arm' that applies more force to the bend of your bars and then bends/cracks them sooner

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wallride a bus everyday

3/11/2020 11:46 AM

OP: Your question is flawed and here is why:

geometry of bars is dictated by the style of riding there are intended for. For example, freestlye bars will typically have more handlebar area (area from the bend) than say bars designed for racing, vert, etc.

Here is one brand sample:

S&M Credence Bars: 29" wide bars 11 deg back sweep, 1 deg up sweep. Best use? Dirt Jumping,

S&M Hoder Bars: 30" wide bars, 11 deg back sweep, 1 deg up sweep. Best Use? Street

The "uninitiated" would look at this and say, "If I wanted more grip area for my super long grips and brakes, I should buy the Hoder bars as the they are 1 inch wider. You would be wrong.

The distance from the bend on the Credence bars are actually 1/2" longer than the Hoder bars. How is that possible
you say? The Hoder bars have a wider cross bar than the Credence bars (geometry you would want in a street bar) vice the narrower cross bar of the Credence that is ideal for dirt jumpers. Since these are rider designed (in most cases), you can assume that the riders know what they use on their bikes and what they prefer.

In this instance, Cline Reynolds rides the Credence bars as they allow for a larger grip area and space for a brake lever (great to have on dirt). On the other side, Mike Hoder rides street and does not need the grip area on the bar side of the handlebars as he ride brakeless.

If you know what you ride, you know how to shop for your parts. If you buy parts because they are cool or you just "like them", you end up with parts that do not support your other parts or riding style. Hope this clears things up and puts you on the path to righteousness!

Hit some bangers! Peace.

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3/11/2020 1:24 PM

i disagree.

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wallride a bus everyday

3/11/2020 2:44 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/11/2020 3:10 PM

BMXogRider wrote:

OP: Your question is flawed and here is why:

geometry of bars is dictated by the style of riding there are intended for. For example, freestlye bars will typically have more handlebar area (area from the bend) than say bars designed for racing, vert, etc.

Here is one brand sample:

S&M Credence Bars: 29" wide bars 11 deg back sweep, 1 deg up sweep. Best use? Dirt Jumping,

S&M Hoder Bars: 30" wide bars, 11 deg back sweep, 1 deg up sweep. Best Use? Street

The "uninitiated" would look at this and say, "If I wanted more grip area for my super long grips and brakes, I should buy the Hoder bars as the they are 1 inch wider. You would be wrong.

The distance from the bend on the Credence bars are actually 1/2" longer than the Hoder bars. How is that possible
you say? The Hoder bars have a wider cross bar than the Credence bars (geometry you would want in a street bar) vice the narrower cross bar of the Credence that is ideal for dirt jumpers. Since these are rider designed (in most cases), you can assume that the riders know what they use on their bikes and what they prefer.

In this instance, Cline Reynolds rides the Credence bars as they allow for a larger grip area and space for a brake lever (great to have on dirt). On the other side, Mike Hoder rides street and does not need the grip area on the bar side of the handlebars as he ride brakeless.

If you know what you ride, you know how to shop for your parts. If you buy parts because they are cool or you just "like them", you end up with parts that do not support your other parts or riding style. Hope this clears things up and puts you on the path to righteousness!

Hit some bangers! Peace.

Clint Reynolds newest 9.25" bars are actually almost identical in box design and grip area to the 9" Hoder bars (30" wide, also).

Both bars are made from the same "straight gauge" material with the only major difference being the cross bar tube thickness. Also, the Credence bars have 3° of upsweep vs. the 1.5° on the Hoder bars.

Plenty of people (including Mike Hoder) use Hoder bars for dirt jumping, so "best use" would actually come down to personal preference.

Also, almost all of Mike Hoder's bike checks in the past couple of years show his bike using brakes (he switches from brakeless to brakes pretty often these days). His newest 9.5" bars actually come in a 31" wide width, so I'm pretty sure it's the longest gripping area you can currently get. I run his 9.5" bars cut down to 28.5" and I'm still able to use 155mm grips and a brake lever without being on the bend.

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3/11/2020 8:49 PM

BMXogRider wrote:

OP: Your question is flawed and here is why:

geometry of bars is dictated by the style of riding there are intended for. For example, freestlye bars will typically have more handlebar area (area from the bend) than say bars designed for racing, vert, etc.

Here is one brand sample:

S&M Credence Bars: 29" wide bars 11 deg back sweep, 1 deg up sweep. Best use? Dirt Jumping,

S&M Hoder Bars: 30" wide bars, 11 deg back sweep, 1 deg up sweep. Best Use? Street

The "uninitiated" would look at this and say, "If I wanted more grip area for my super long grips and brakes, I should buy the Hoder bars as the they are 1 inch wider. You would be wrong.

The distance from the bend on the Credence bars are actually 1/2" longer than the Hoder bars. How is that possible
you say? The Hoder bars have a wider cross bar than the Credence bars (geometry you would want in a street bar) vice the narrower cross bar of the Credence that is ideal for dirt jumpers. Since these are rider designed (in most cases), you can assume that the riders know what they use on their bikes and what they prefer.

In this instance, Cline Reynolds rides the Credence bars as they allow for a larger grip area and space for a brake lever (great to have on dirt). On the other side, Mike Hoder rides street and does not need the grip area on the bar side of the handlebars as he ride brakeless.

If you know what you ride, you know how to shop for your parts. If you buy parts because they are cool or you just "like them", you end up with parts that do not support your other parts or riding style. Hope this clears things up and puts you on the path to righteousness!

Hit some bangers! Peace.

Bryan91 wrote:

Clint Reynolds newest 9.25" bars are actually almost identical in box design and grip area to the 9" Hoder bars (30" wide, also).

Both bars are made from the same "straight gauge" material with the only major difference being the cross bar tube thickness. Also, the Credence bars have 3° of upsweep vs. the 1.5° on the Hoder bars.

Plenty of people (including Mike Hoder) use Hoder bars for dirt jumping, so "best use" would actually come down to personal preference.

Also, almost all of Mike Hoder's bike checks in the past couple of years show his bike using brakes (he switches from brakeless to brakes pretty often these days). His newest 9.5" bars actually come in a 31" wide width, so I'm pretty sure it's the longest gripping area you can currently get. I run his 9.5" bars cut down to 28.5" and I'm still able to use 155mm grips and a brake lever without being on the bend.

Yes and yes. I simply gave two random examples. I wasn’t stating which bars are currently the “best”. Just demonstrating to OP what will give him the best gauge for selecting bars to fit their needs.

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3/12/2020 4:10 AM

I've had the same issues and then went for the Stolen Roll bars in 9,5" and those worked good for me!

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