New kink contender frame has open end caps your thoughts?

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2/25/2019 6:17 AM

I think it looks cool as a throw back to old frames.

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I believe in hub guard protection

2/25/2019 6:18 AM

I don't think your picture is loading......

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2/25/2019 6:21 AM

threesomemist wrote:

I think it looks cool as a throw back to old frames.

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2/25/2019 6:31 AM

I think it would collect dirt

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2/25/2019 6:35 AM

All kink frames are like that.

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2/25/2019 7:23 AM

This has always freaked me out, and I don’t buy frames like that. Also feel much more comfortable on brakeless frames for the same reason

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2/25/2019 7:42 AM

Those drops look rad and the knurling on the inside is brilliant

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2/25/2019 7:45 AM

Federal were doing that years ago. They still have caps, but the caps have holes

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2/25/2019 7:55 AM

Why would you want dirt and moisture having a place to get inside your frame makes no sense to me

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2/25/2019 7:59 AM

Maybe the holes only go so deep and there's a wall inside the cap.

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2/25/2019 8:22 AM

eskimojay wrote:

Why would you want dirt and moisture having a place to get inside your frame makes no sense to me

Most frames today are coated on the inside as well to prevent rust.

Also, though it may seem counterintuitive, you can have holes where water and dirt and stuff get in, as long as you have a hole where water and dirt and stuff can get out. When it gets in but has no way to get out, THAT is when things get messy.

Lots of frames have small holes here and there to aid in moisture escaping.

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BMX over 30: Eat clean, Stretch, and Pray.

2/25/2019 8:33 AM

eskimojay wrote:

Why would you want dirt and moisture having a place to get inside your frame makes no sense to me

TheDarkEnergist wrote:

Most frames today are coated on the inside as well to prevent rust.

Also, though it may seem counterintuitive, you can have holes where water and dirt and stuff get in, as long as you have a hole where water and dirt and stuff can get out. When it gets in but has no way to get out, THAT is when things get messy.

Lots of frames have small holes here and there to aid in moisture escaping.

Technically, those holes are there to allow air to circulate during welding. But, it's also good for air circulation and removing moisture in general. Holes in the end caps would probably allow more air circulation, and less chance of rust. I've had stays practically fill up with water before (getting stuck in a down pour whilst riding), and it all runs out of the seat tube when you put the bike upside down

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2/25/2019 8:38 AM

grumpySteve wrote:

Technically, those holes are there to allow air to circulate during welding. But, it's also good for air circulation and removing moisture in general. Holes in the end caps would probably allow more air circulation, and less chance of rust. I've had stays practically fill up with water before (getting stuck in a down pour whilst riding), and it all runs out of the seat tube when you put the bike upside down

True, didn't think of the welding part. Airflow is definitely a must. But yeah I wouldn't worry about un-capped stays. I'm seeing more and more rust coming from the underside of my top tube from my brake mounts than anywhere else currently.

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BMX over 30: Eat clean, Stretch, and Pray.

2/25/2019 9:34 AM

Super-Pawl wrote:

Those drops look rad and the knurling on the inside is brilliant

I thought the same thing it's meant so hub guards won't rotate.

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I believe in hub guard protection

2/25/2019 1:33 PM
Edited Date/Time: 3/3/2019 11:26 PM

TheDarkEnergist wrote:

Most frames today are coated on the inside as well to prevent rust.

Also, though it may seem counterintuitive, you can have holes where water and dirt and stuff get in, as long as you have a hole where water and dirt and stuff can get out. When it gets in but has no way to get out, THAT is when things get messy.

Lots of frames have small holes here and there to aid in moisture escaping.

grumpySteve wrote:

Technically, those holes are there to allow air to circulate during welding. But, it's also good for air circulation and removing moisture in general. Holes in the end caps would probably allow more air circulation, and less chance of rust. I've had stays practically fill up with water before (getting stuck in a down pour whilst riding), and it all runs out of the seat tube when you put the bike upside down

TheDarkEnergist wrote:

True, didn't think of the welding part. Airflow is definitely a must. But yeah I wouldn't worry about un-capped stays. I'm seeing more and more rust coming from the underside of my top tube from my brake mounts than anywhere else currently.

The small seemingly useless holes in frames near welds are for the welding gasses would building up inside the tube. Most frames have holes drilled into whatever tube they're connected to as well, so uncapped stays is more of a look thing nowadays, especially with investment cast dropouts such as these. My Stranger frame has pretty similar ones. Investment cast's strength worries me more than the potential of rust does tbh

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2/26/2019 10:32 AM

-Havok- wrote:

The small seemingly useless holes in frames near welds are for the welding gasses would building up inside the tube. Most frames have holes drilled into whatever tube they're connected to as well, so uncapped stays is more of a look thing nowadays, especially with investment cast dropouts such as these. My Stranger frame has pretty similar ones. Investment cast's strength worries me more than the potential of rust does tbh

A lot of forks & dropouts seem to be made with investment casting these days, and I thought it was because it was stronger than traditional welding. Is this not the case? Please elaborate.

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