Phones vs Cameras

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9/22/2019 2:32 PM

As phones progress in their technology I always wonder, will they ever be as good as the cameras professionals use? When the iPhone 11 Pro came out with their new camera design and functions, I was mainly excited for the 'Super-Wide Angle' feature. So, even with all these features and advancement, why are phones not used for clips and parts? Will they ever be in the future? I'm just curious on the tech and why filmers choose one and not the other.

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The guy who never rides because he breaks something all the time.

9/22/2019 2:42 PM

I’m all for phones taking over , just get them god damn over hyped vx cameras out of the hands of the hipsters wishing they where skaters

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9/22/2019 3:24 PM

Phone camera sensors are small, which means they take in less light. Because of that, the phone software has to automatically compensate by doing things like bumping the ISO, which ends up with more noise.

Phone cameras are terrible in low-light.

With a phone camera, you have a hell of a lot less control over how the end result looks. No manual ISO control, no aperture control, any "zooming" is done by cropping what the sensor receives, which leads to a very noisy image.

Usually phone footage is quite shaky, even with stabilization.

I'm sure there are plenty of other reasons to use a proper camera setup but I'm not arsed typing them all out.

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My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
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"You can't educate pork"
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9/22/2019 3:30 PM

p1p1092 wrote:

Phone camera sensors are small, which means they take in less light. Because of that, the phone software has to automatically compensate by doing things like bumping the ISO, which ends up with more noise.

Phone cameras are terrible in low-light.

With a phone camera, you have a hell of a lot less control over how the end result looks. No manual ISO control, no aperture control, any "zooming" is done by cropping what the sensor receives, which leads to a very noisy image.

Usually phone footage is quite shaky, even with stabilization.

I'm sure there are plenty of other reasons to use a proper camera setup but I'm not arsed typing them all out.

Oh yea, def saw the stabilization issue, but what about other phones that give you that control. Samsung's cameras give you a Pro feature for their cameras that allows you to tweak the ISO and other controls. What about the iPhone 11 Pro's night feature. It's seriously the best phone that I've seen capture images with that amount of light.

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The guy who never rides because he breaks something all the time.

9/22/2019 3:41 PM

SlavBMX wrote:

Oh yea, def saw the stabilization issue, but what about other phones that give you that control. Samsung's cameras give you a Pro feature for their cameras that allows you to tweak the ISO and other controls. What about the iPhone 11 Pro's night feature. It's seriously the best phone that I've seen capture images with that amount of light.

I wasn't aware the manual mode was available with video?

All the same, it's working with a tiny, noisy sensor and relying on some software magic to make a passable result. With a DSLR, you can control everything to make the end result look a certain way and capture a more detailed/less noisy image/video.

The major advantages phones have are portability, cost and availability but the likes of the new Sony mirrorless cameras are catching up in the portability area.

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My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
Insta: @p.gibbons

"You can't educate pork"
- grumpySteve

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!""
- Hunter S. Thompson

9/22/2019 10:36 PM

Phones pretty much use Instagram style filters to make your photo or video look better than it is. But cost comparison is massively in a phones favour. I’ve made quite a few edits using either my old Sony phone, or a go pro. I had a dslr for a while, but when you add up the costs, it just didn’t seem worth it to me. But obviously I’m not a professional.

It depends where you’re viewing the footage too. On your phone, the phone footage can look really good. But put it on a big screen and it’ll look crap compared to a decent camera.

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9/23/2019 4:59 AM

SlavBMX wrote:

As phones progress in their technology I always wonder, will they ever be as good as the cameras professionals use? When the iPhone 11 Pro came out with their new camera design and functions, I was mainly excited for the 'Super-Wide Angle' feature. So, even with all these features and advancement, why are phones not used for clips and parts? Will they ever be in the future? I'm just curious on the tech and why filmers choose one and not the other.

I think they are in some scenarios, and cameras in others for better picture/features.

But on the pro level, it is a lot of camera specifically, and then phones for alternate angles/inta clips.

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"Hey anybody ever make that mistake like right when you wake up in the morning and you believe in yourself?" -Kyle Kinane

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10/10/2019 6:35 AM

For the regular/average rider phones have gotten very good for filming small edits, especially when the sun is shining (as another commentor mentioned low-light is the biggest shortcoming of phone-filming). But if you are filming a "real" edit, like a pro or someone on a team or something, then you can't beat using a real video camera like a DSLR with nice rotary optical zoom, aperture control, accessory mic's, lens options, etc.

As for me, I am very excited at the improvements being made in phone-camera's and can't wait to pick up the new iPhone 11 sometime soon. Will probably grab a phone gimbal this time as well to smooth things out!

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Streetbikes and Bicycles

10/12/2019 9:57 AM

If you look at the newer Huawei models they are pretty damn great, even in low light and matches a lot of the photos I take with my mirror less Panasonic Lumix or Canon EOS.

BUT! With someone who really knows what he/she is doing behind the camera, who can really control the settings to get the image you want, a real DSLR will be better.

But for filming Instagram clips or simple edits I’d prefer a good phone (like the Huawei) because it’s so crazy simple to use and easy to get a good clip right away, without transferring via computers and so on before getting it online.

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10/13/2019 5:28 AM
Edited Date/Time: 10/13/2019 5:29 AM

Some phones will easily outshine any camera when in the wrong hands, which is more often than not the case. Also higher end android phones these days shit all over anything apple, especially for overall quality and easy to use content creation.

Video on iPhone saves as mov format = throw phone in the trash just for that reason alone.

Huawei +1 miles better than iPhone in every way.

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10/13/2019 7:09 AM
Edited Date/Time: 10/13/2019 7:12 AM

I’m pretty stoked on my iPhone for filming second angles. Just pop it on a cheap cell-phone tripod and let it record, while someone films fish eye on my Panasonic HVX200A.

The video quality is comparable to that of my Panasonic, so the clips actually look quite decent together (far better than using a GoPro for second angles imo.)

Quite a few people film edits solely on their iPhones. Check out Joe Battaglia and Matt Perkins. I also remember a popular Nokia-filmed edit with Alex Kennedy many years back that was very enjoyable to watch.


As for the iPhone 11 Wide Angle, I wouldn’t use it for anything but IG clips. It looks cool, but it definitely doesn’t have that authentic fisheye look to the footage.


Edit: My previous Samsung S8 had, what was supposed to be, a much better camera. But in reality, it was absolute garbage unless filming in the utmost perfect conditions. The zoom was choppy and not even remotely smooth, and most clips looked grainy for no apparent reason. Took stunning photos though!

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