Pinched dropout, cant remove wheel.

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11/28/2018 7:42 AM

I just bought a new complete WeThePeople Justice rode it once (I'm a beginner so it was only small grinds on a metal ledges). My spokes got crazy loose, which is to be expected with new wheels; however I cannot take my back wheel off because my back dropout seems to be pinched and theres a decent dent on the drive side chainstay.

I cannot imagine grinding an 18inch ledge would dent and bend a fully chromoly frame, I dont really care about the dent too much I just wanna true/tighten up my wheel so I can ride, bike shops are saying they cant true a wheel on a frame. So ill probably just try to do it myself so I can ride because I know it can be done for sure. I dont wanna be banging/cutting/filing on my frame till I hear back from WTP.

TLDR: Has anyone trued a wheel on a frame before or not been able to get a back wheel off from a pinched dropout, if so what did you do? I just wanna ride and probably being impatient.

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11/28/2018 7:57 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/28/2018 8:01 AM

It's not the height of the ledge that matters; it's how you absorb the impact when you first hit the ledge. If you absorb the impact properly, you're far less likely to break/bend anything.

Everyone has trued a wheel in a frame at some point; it's definitely doable but it's not as good as the actual dedicated tool for the task(truing stand). Most people don't have truing stands and they manage just fine; just use the old cable-tie trick:



I have only had to deal with a bent dropout once but I just got a crowbar and bent it back. Another solution would be to grind off the ends of the dropouts but I'd avoid that until everything else has failed.
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My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
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"You can't educate pork"
- grumpySteve

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!""
- Hunter S. Thompson

11/28/2018 7:59 AM

I've trued my back wheel without removing it, I find it a lot easier that way since I don't have a stand. But I'd be more worried about how the heck that happened to your bike.

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11/28/2018 8:17 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/28/2018 8:18 AM

p1p1092 wrote:

It's not the height of the ledge that matters; it's how you absorb the impact when you first hit the ledge. If you absorb the impact properly, you're far less likely to break/bend anything.

Everyone has trued a wheel in a frame at some point; it's definitely doable but it's not as good as the actual dedicated tool for the task(truing stand). Most people don't have truing stands and they manage just fine; just use the old cable-tie trick:



I have only had to deal with a bent dropout once but I just got a crowbar and bent it back. Another solution would be to grind off the ends of the dropouts but I'd avoid that until everything else has failed.

Ive never seen the zip tie video thanks! I'll definitely do something like that, I actually used to do similar things for work, so ill just get the tool and give it try.

I know its not he size of the ledge that matters its more that Im a beginner and Im not riding up to it super aggressive and slamming my bike against it. Its more of a roll up, hoping on and off trying to learn how to slide a little and getting locked into grinds.

Like Rabbe said Im more like how did this happen to the bike already, I know bikes are going to be dented and beat up, but one mild ride and I already have to hammer and alter my frame to get a wheel off just is a bummer. Im gonna wait till i hear back from WTP, but i have a feeling ill have to crowbar and tweak it open. So glad to hear that works!

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11/28/2018 8:22 AM

I wouldn't expect to hear back from WTP soon. They have a notoriously absent customer service department.

But...this is honestly kind of the way learning BMX goes. When you don't know how to land or how to set up on a grind, you're probably going to break parts.

For example - When I tried learning double peg stalls on a ledge I used to absolutely slam the back wheel and ended up folding several spokes. I eventually realized how to approach the ledge and land properly and there aren't any issues.

Dropouts, BB, that kind of stuff is going to take the most abuse. Can you post a picture?

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BMX over 30: Eat clean, Stretch, and Pray.

11/28/2018 8:32 AM

Paullard wrote:

Ive never seen the zip tie video thanks! I'll definitely do something like that, I actually used to do similar things for work, so ill just get the tool and give it try.

I know its not he size of the ledge that matters its more that Im a beginner and Im not riding up to it super aggressive and slamming my bike against it. Its more of a roll up, hoping on and off trying to learn how to slide a little and getting locked into grinds.

Like Rabbe said Im more like how did this happen to the bike already, I know bikes are going to be dented and beat up, but one mild ride and I already have to hammer and alter my frame to get a wheel off just is a bummer. Im gonna wait till i hear back from WTP, but i have a feeling ill have to crowbar and tweak it open. So glad to hear that works!

Best way to learn wheel maintenance, or most things of that kind, is to go into it assuming you know nothing and trying to understand how the wheel overall reacts to small changes.

To tension the wheel, tighten every nipple by the same amount(the aim being even tension) until you're happy with the overall tension. The best way to check spoke tension, is to grab a pair or parallel spokes(not crossed spokes, parallel ones) and squeeze them together. Get another wheel to reference what good spoke tension feels like.

A wheel should be true both radially and laterally(a lot of people forget the radial true at first). By changing one, you'll change the other. The idea is to find a balance between perfectly true in both directions.

What's your weight? Bent dropouts are usually caused by a mix of weight, technique and the quality of the frame.

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My Sunday Soundwave V3 Build
Insta: @p.gibbons

"You can't educate pork"
- grumpySteve

"Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!""
- Hunter S. Thompson

11/28/2018 8:38 AM

TheDarkEnergist yeah thats good to know. Also thats kinda what I'm noticing even just typing all this out, stuffs gonna get smashed and broken might as well learn to fix it myself. Im probably just gonna bend the fucker back tonight and keep riding. So sorry if its all beginner wanting things perfect nonsense on my end haha.

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11/28/2018 9:09 AM

Are you grinding without pegs?

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11/28/2018 9:28 AM

dead goon wrote:

Are you grinding without pegs?

No I have pegs, it was drive side, and theres no hub gaurd on it.

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11/28/2018 9:33 AM

Your best bet is to file it down to open the gap up. Then maybe trim the dropout closer to your peg. It sounds like you're landing back first so you're putting all that force on the end of the dropout.

I've built plenty of wheels using only my frame/forks to judge true. I hold my stay, and put my thumb nail as close as possible to the rim. Where it touches, tighten the spokes on the opposite side. If it's still pretty true and just needs to be tensioned, just tighten every spoke quarter of a turn, then repeat as necessary

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11/28/2018 11:11 AM

Paullard wrote:

TheDarkEnergist yeah thats good to know. Also thats kinda what I'm noticing even just typing all this out, stuffs gonna get smashed and broken might as well learn to fix it myself. Im probably just gonna bend the fucker back tonight and keep riding. So sorry if its all beginner wanting things perfect nonsense on my end haha.

Don't apologize dude! I'm just glad to hear someone open to working on stuff themselves and figure it out. It's a good habit to learn how to work on your bike to save so much money and time going to and from the bike shop.

Eventually you'll learn what kind of fuck up you can still ride with, and what you can kinda ignore and won't affect your riding.

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BMX over 30: Eat clean, Stretch, and Pray.

11/28/2018 11:58 AM

TheDarkEnergist wrote:

Don't apologize dude! I'm just glad to hear someone open to working on stuff themselves and figure it out. It's a good habit to learn how to work on your bike to save so much money and time going to and from the bike shop.

Eventually you'll learn what kind of fuck up you can still ride with, and what you can kinda ignore and won't affect your riding.

This, no need for apologies. Nice to see people who are willing to learn to do things themselves.

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11/28/2018 3:27 PM

Just an update, got home and with a 17mm wrench pried her open enough to get the wheel out, Thanks all for the help and advice everyone!!

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11/28/2018 4:15 PM

My front dropouts are bent right now and the wheel sits on the side. It's so weird to ride! I understand a messed up back wheel, but front? Gives me the chills every time I look at it. Gonna need some new forks soon.

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