Reversing Cranks

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2/2/2015 11:27 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/2/2015 11:44 PM

Will red thread locker prevent opposite threaded pedals from unscrewing themselves?

I might pick up some RHD/LHD 2pc cranks (tibias) from someone on here for use with a RHD spline drive sprocket. The problem is that the product description says spline drive can only be used for LHD for these cranks. I am thinking to reverse the cranks so I can use the spline drive on the right side. The only thing that would be bad, i think, is the pedal threading. I am thinking to use red/permanent thread locker to prevent them from unscrewing.

Will red thread locker prevent opposite threaded pedals from unscrewing themselves???

*If you have never used thread locker please do not comment what you think will happen.

Thanks

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i ride a Sunday

Refs: irideafly, subrosarider65, ridebmx456, ayobmx, spikez5

cell #: 424-219-2490

2/2/2015 11:52 PM

Using red lock-tite will pretty much ensure that your pedals won't come loose unless you use extreme force or heat, assuming you let it dry first. My friend's pedals always came loose so he used red lock-tite and they still came loose often cause he didn't let them dry for more than like 15 minutes. That or the lock-tite was weaker for some reason.

If you do this, I advise switching your pedal bodies so you're not riding backward pedals.

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2/3/2015 9:40 AM

You will be fine with red loc tite. Just make sure all the threads are oil/grease free before installing.

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2/3/2015 10:43 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/3/2015 10:47 AM

I have done this with the Stolen Team cranks.
After my pedals came loose from trying with a hex key I used a T bar for more leverage and they have never came loose since, I even copper greased the thread.

you will however have to swap your pedal bodies over, or your pedals will feel weird pointing backwards. I have Premium slims so changing the bodies was piss

never used thread locking, just a spot of grease so they dont cease and some leverage. RHD spline drive is epic, no tight spots!

that red stuff is serious shit though you usually need a blow torch to get it free I would only use blue if your pedals come loose after using decent leverage.

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2/3/2015 1:46 PM

Thanks guys! I didn't even think about switching the pedal bodies.

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i ride a Sunday

Refs: irideafly, subrosarider65, ridebmx456, ayobmx, spikez5

cell #: 424-219-2490

2/3/2015 1:51 PM

no, regular loctite will not help in the longrun. it might help for a bit, but wont last forever. over time, riding the bike puts a mechanical force on the cranks and pedals called "precession" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precession so basically if you flip the cranks, you're actively pushing the pedals out. even if you tighten them often, each time they move the tiniest bit, you're wearing away the threads. eventually you'll blow out the pedals and crank beyond what a tap and die set can fix. do not flip the cranks even with a thread locker.

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2/3/2015 2:31 PM

Honestly I would just invest in cranks that will work for what you want, or get a non-spline drive.

Simple fix.

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"Hey anybody ever make that mistake like right when you wake up in the morning and you believe in yourself?" -Kyle Kinane

"BIKES!" -Tom Segura

2/3/2015 3:36 PM

Thread lock is kind of a bad idea in my opinion. Depending on what kind it is, it can wear out after a while or it can make it so it'll be damn near impossible to take parts apart.
I personally wouldn't recommend it. If you want things to not loosen, whipe off any grease, oil, dirt, or whatever, and tighten that bitch as much as you can.
But I mean if you are for certain that you don't want nothing to loosen up, use thread lock.
Otherwise just weld the shit. I had a friend who welded a seat post to his frame, pedals to his crank arms, and bars to his stem, but he was a trained, professional welder with previous experience.

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"Ride it like you stole it."

Refs: SuperstarDK, Gage191

2/3/2015 3:46 PM

know what, Baphometh has the right idea. weld that sucker.

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2/3/2015 3:56 PM

Velo/Raptor wrote:

know what, Baphometh has the right idea. weld that sucker.

Real shit man. As long as you know what you're doing, or have a friend that does, it is the best idea. I wouldn't do it if you have PC pedals, but if you do just take the plates of the spindle before you do. If you're THAT worried about it loosening up, just find a welder who is willing to do the job for you.
I've tried thread lock, but it never did any justice for me. I must've used shitty thread lock. Also Gorilla Glue can work, but that wears out eventually.

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"Ride it like you stole it."

Refs: SuperstarDK, Gage191

2/3/2015 4:47 PM

Baphometh wrote:

Thread lock is kind of a bad idea in my opinion. Depending on what kind it is, it can wear out after a while or it can make it ...more

Welding parts is stupid. Example - you brake a pedal somehow, hello new pedals AND cranks

strip your stem threads, new bars and a stem...and so on
that is all.

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2/3/2015 5:33 PM

Shady~Piez wrote:

Welding parts is stupid. Example - you brake a pedal somehow, hello new pedals AND cranks

strip your stem threads, new bars ...more

Yeah, obviously haha, but if you're desperate enough to not want parts to loosen, you can go to those extremes.

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"Ride it like you stole it."

Refs: SuperstarDK, Gage191

2/4/2015 8:06 PM

Baphometh wrote:

Thread lock is kind of a bad idea in my opinion. Depending on what kind it is, it can wear out after a while or it can make it ...more

Shady~Piez wrote:

Welding parts is stupid. Example - you brake a pedal somehow, hello new pedals AND cranks

strip your stem threads, new bars ...more

Baphometh wrote:

Yeah, obviously haha, but if you're desperate enough to not want parts to loosen, you can go to those extremes.

I can weld but I'm definitely not about to do that as I run plastic pedals and that's kinda insane. Blue thread locker works on my motorcycle so I cant imagine red thread locker won't hold up on a bike.

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i ride a Sunday

Refs: irideafly, subrosarider65, ridebmx456, ayobmx, spikez5

cell #: 424-219-2490

2/4/2015 8:15 PM

Baphometh wrote:

Thread lock is kind of a bad idea in my opinion. Depending on what kind it is, it can wear out after a while or it can make it ...more

Welding bars to a stem or a seat post to a frame is impossible. You cannot weld chromoly to aluminum.

Red thread lock releases with just a little heat, if you read about it that is how it designed.

To the dude saying the threads will wear out....you are just high man. you realize you can remove/install pedals thousands of times without this happening.

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2/4/2015 8:24 PM

bobPA wrote:

Welding bars to a stem or a seat post to a frame is impossible. You cannot weld chromoly to aluminum.

Red thread lock ...more

Was just going to comment on that, but in his defense you CAN weld a seat post to a frame because some older/stock seat posts are chromoly, so you could weld those ones.

Everything else you said I agree with though, red lock-tite will loosen up with some heat and/or man power.





Honestly though I'd just ride them and see if they come loose on you BEFORE you put lock-tite in there. I had a friend who had backwards cranks and his pedals never once came loose from riding them like that. If they come loose on you, then yeah go for it.

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2/4/2015 8:27 PM

Velo/Raptor wrote:

no, regular loctite will not help in the longrun. it might help for a bit, but wont last forever. over time, riding the bike ...more

Precession is the result of a force that acts in an opposite direction to the intended direction of force that something is meant to sustain. The torque force to hold a pedal bolt in a crank is horizontal, either the the left or right. Downward force from the rider's weight is applied to the horizontally threaded pedal bolts whether they are mounted regular or opposite. Therefore, precession occurs in both normally and opposite cranks setups, as force from the rider's weight is always acting in a vertical motion opposite to the horizontal force that threads a bolt inward or outward.

The reason pedal bolts are threaded the way they are, is because the weight of the rider exerts a pressure on the pedal bearings, and this pressure creates resistance to the pedals rotating freely on their spindles, and in turn some rotational force is transferred to the spindles (instead of all rotational force being isolated to the bearings). Pedals are threaded the way they are so that this small rotational force is directed inwards so the pedal spindle is always screwing itself in. When cranks are reversed, the small rotational force on the spindle created from bearing resistance is directed in the opposite direction (outward) so the pedal spindles unscrew themselves.

The thread locker is used to prevent this small rotational force from overcoming the static torque in the threads that holds the pedals screwed in. The thread locker glues the threads together so it takes more force to unscrew the pedals than the force that one initially applied to screw the pedals in; to unscrew, you have to overcome the force of the glue and the force you applied to screw them in.

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i ride a Sunday

Refs: irideafly, subrosarider65, ridebmx456, ayobmx, spikez5

cell #: 424-219-2490

2/4/2015 10:18 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/4/2015 10:19 PM

sundaybmxRR wrote:

Was just going to comment on that, but in his defense you CAN weld a seat post to a frame because some older/stock seat posts ...more

Thanks bobPA and sundaybmxRR, I didn't realize that the thread locker softens with heat. Riding shouldn't generate enough heat that something like a heat gun generates though so I should be fine. That's a good tip to loosen thread locked bolts though.

And you can weld aluminum to steel but its a really complicated process and you have to like coat it with like some intermediate bonding material first.

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i ride a Sunday

Refs: irideafly, subrosarider65, ridebmx456, ayobmx, spikez5

cell #: 424-219-2490

2/5/2015 3:57 PM

Baphometh wrote:

Thread lock is kind of a bad idea in my opinion. Depending on what kind it is, it can wear out after a while or it can make it ...more

Unless he had an aluminum frame or a steel seatpost, I call BS.

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"Hey anybody ever make that mistake like right when you wake up in the morning and you believe in yourself?" -Kyle Kinane

"BIKES!" -Tom Segura

2/5/2015 4:14 PM

Jake_Short wrote:

Thanks bobPA and sundaybmxRR, I didn't realize that the thread locker softens with heat. Riding shouldn't generate enough heat ...more

That's not welding, and no you can't. The melting points alone are too far apart. Plus steel typically uses DIRECT CURRENT (electricity for weld goes in one direction, and aluminum uses ALTERNATING CURRENT (electricity switches direction multiple times per second). Ferrous and non-ferrous metals cannot be welded in the traditional sense.

You might be thinking of SOLDERING which is it's own category. Basically that is heating the material in between the steel and aluminum to stick them together. (Think wiring for a stereo)

The ONLY thing I could find is call FRICTION STIR WELDING, which is is a solid-state joining process (the metal is not melted) that uses a third body tool to join two facing surfaces. Heat is generated between the tool and material which leads to a very soft region near the FSW tool. It then mechanically intermixes the two pieces of metal at the place of the joint, then the softened metal (due to the elevated temperature) can be joined using mechanical pressure (which is applied by the tool), much like joining clay, or dough.

So in all reality it is not welding, it is mashing the materials together with pressure and friction.

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"Hey anybody ever make that mistake like right when you wake up in the morning and you believe in yourself?" -Kyle Kinane

"BIKES!" -Tom Segura