So...about the big ol' fatty tires.

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10/12/2017 7:05 PM

Found this.

Im sure other things factor in and most bmx riders do not run rims as wide as their tires but interesting results and information.

I know this has been debated and will continue but Some good stuff here.



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10/12/2017 11:09 PM

There's a pretty big difference between 28c and 2.4" though. No matter what science might say, I know that wide tyres make turning feel sluggish. And there's a pretty big difference in riding styles between roadies and bmx

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10/12/2017 11:55 PM

I ride a fat tire in front, and a more narrow one on the rear. Keep both at 110 PSI. Feels okay to me, I prefer dirt.

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10/13/2017 4:49 AM
Edited Date/Time: 10/13/2017 4:58 AM

grumpySteve wrote:

There's a pretty big difference between 28c and 2.4" though. No matter what science might say, I know that wide tyres make ...more

From a street perspective.... ^^^ THIS ^^^.

I find the 2.4's to be sluggish. That's fine if you don't mind, but I've been riding (on & off) since the beginning of freestyle BMX & lived thru the lower pressure tires up thru the initial introduction of high-pressure tires & to today. So, I have ridden all pressures & sizes. I prefer the slightly thinner tires with high pressure.

P.S. ..."wider tires create LESS rolling resistance..."

Uh.... I'm not sure if they know what they are talking about or if I'm missing something. Simple physics applies.... the more contact patch there is, the more rolling resistance. All (other) things being equal, if you were to throw a non-rolling piece of steel down a smooth surface that has a contact patch of, lets say 10" & then did the same with a non-rolling piece of steel with only a 1" contact patch, there's less point of contact to create said resistance with the 1" contact test subject.

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10/13/2017 6:35 AM

I ride a big ass tyre in the front to benefit traction and stability (= sluggishness for some) and a narrower on the back for less rolling resistance.

To Mishinn_Control
"Wider tyres create LESS rolling resistance"

From a Bmx perspective it is DUMB.
But the standards for road bikes are way different, 21c being their standard, and they now push to bigger like 25 or 28c for comfort, traction and less rolling resistance, as weird as it sounds.
Once the rider gets on the bike, even with tyres pumped up to 100+ psi, the tyre deforms and the narrow tyre will create an overall longer contact patch than the wider tyre, so more rolling resistance.

Photo

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10/13/2017 6:40 AM

Francky wrote:

I ride a big ass tyre in the front to benefit traction and stability (= sluggishness for some) and a narrower on the back for ...more

OK... so THAT makes sense & holds true to what I was saying about contact patch. I thought, for a minute there, that I was going nuts. LOL. Thanx for the info (but yeah, in BMX, it really isn't a benefit... more of a looks, feel, preference thing).

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10/13/2017 6:50 AM

Mishinn_Control wrote:

OK... so THAT makes sense & holds true to what I was saying about contact patch. I thought, for a minute there, that I was ...more

Yup ! Don't worry you are not going nuts man.
I got the same pucture with more details, the sidewalls is way too much solicited with the narrow tyre.

Photo

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10/13/2017 2:19 PM

grumpySteve wrote:

There's a pretty big difference between 28c and 2.4" though. No matter what science might say, I know that wide tyres make ...more

Mishinn_Control wrote:

From a street perspective.... ^^^ THIS ^^^.

I find the 2.4's to be sluggish. That's fine if you don't mind, but I've been ...more

There is a LOT more to it than just the contact patch though-the durometer of the rubber plays a massive factor too. Small contact patch of soft rubber can and will have more rolling resistance when compared to a harder rubber with a slightly larger contact patch. That is why many road bike brands have been toying with dual compound tires-soft on the sides for grip in turns, and harder in the middle for speed etc when going straight-AND they have scientifically proven that a 25C and in some cases a 28C tire can be FASTER than a 23C with a narrow contact patch.

The tread plays a big factor too. While it is a general rule of thumb, it is not the end all be all statement to say "wider tires have more rolling resistance". Generally yes, but when you dive into rubber compounds, tread design and so on, you can create a wider tire (25 and 28C) setup that has LESS resistance than a 23C.

There has also been wind tunnel testing to determine the best width to wind resistance for a tire, and I recall that a 25C was the best option for that-allowing the wind to flow with less resistance and turbulence over a wheel/bike.

BMX bikes (for freestyle anyway) are pretty much not considered because speed and efficiency is not typically the main goal like a road bike.

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10/13/2017 11:56 PM

I had been riding animal glhs in 2.1 for about 6 months and they were great.

....about 3 weeks ago I went to the animal/t1 tires in 2.4 front and back, and it is definitely a totally different feel; they are definitely less responsive and make your ride feel completely different, but at my weight (220) they are amazing as far as cushioning and instill much more confidence as the wider contact patch really does give you more grip and stability when doing wallrides and carving. I will never go back to something as skinny as those glhs in 2.1, wil most likely run something between 2.25-2.35.

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