Starting Something New

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2/10/2019 6:45 AM

Hi everyone. Long time bmx boy here.

Been at myself to try starting a bmx shop up here in Canada. In the city, no bmx shops for 100s of kms.

My city is trying to get people going and be more active and I think that's a good opportunity for my business. An indoor park is also on its way in the near future.

I'm not really asking if I should go for it, because i'm pretty convinced already lol I'm just wondering if you guys could help me with info like profit margins, distros, just info really. Bike shops are pretty private with that info (understandable, i guess lol), so i thought i'd come here.

Thanks!

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2/10/2019 7:38 AM

I would start by ringing up different distros and seeing which brands they stock and asking for prices/shipping ect.
Also you will probably want to stick some road and mountain bikes as they will bring in a lot more money than BMX and keep the BMX part of the shop afloat.

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Hmmm

2/10/2019 7:55 AM

Most distro's won't even talk to you until you have a shop. There's a reason bmx shops are dying. They simply can't compete with online shops.

I looked into myself. It would cost a good 20k to open, stay open, refit, and stock a shop. Then you have to sell the equivalent of an aftermarket frame every day just to stay open.

I'm not trying to put you off. It's just the reality of it.

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2/10/2019 7:56 AM

Edman123 wrote:

I would start by ringing up different distros and seeing which brands they stock and asking for prices/shipping ect.
Also you will probably want to stick some road and mountain bikes as they will bring in a lot more money than BMX and keep the BMX part of the shop afloat.

I was thinking about having more than bmx, but more in the direction of scooters and skateboards. We have a couple well established road/ mountain bike shops in the area.

Do you have previous experience in bike shops by any chance???

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2/10/2019 8:02 AM

Skylar_Ouellette wrote:

Hi everyone. Long time bmx boy here.

Been at myself to try starting a bmx shop up here in Canada. In the city, no bmx shops for 100s of kms.

My city is trying to get people going and be more active and I think that's a good opportunity for my business. An indoor park is also on its way in the near future.

I'm not really asking if I should go for it, because i'm pretty convinced already lol I'm just wondering if you guys could help me with info like profit margins, distros, just info really. Bike shops are pretty private with that info (understandable, i guess lol), so i thought i'd come here.

Thanks!

Profit margins: Expect to break even at the very best, especially if you plan to focus on BMX.
One of my close friends runs our local shop, and he works from 10AM to 10PM+ most days to keep up with the work load, and unfortunately still isn't making enough money to afford full-time help (he is basically a one-man army.)
He tries to focus on BMX (mostly old-school repairs/restores,) but at the end of the day, road bikes are what keeps the shop open.
This is also in the U.S., where we don't have any additional upcharges on bikes & parts. In Canada, the costs of parts are ridiculous, so I'm sure that is damaging to the profit margin.

Here's just a few tips I can think of;

1. Don't focus primarily on BMX or stocking a wide variety of BMX stuff, unless the demand for it becomes present & consistent. BMX is unfortunately like a black-hole when it comes to finances.

2. Advertise heavily towards the road bike scene, they will likely be your #1 customers. And who knows? Maybe when their kids are of age, they may bring them into your shop to check out a BMX.

3. Create a "hang-out spot" inside your shop where riders can lounge, buy a drink, rest up, etc. This gives the shop a good friendly vibe. I know from experience that customers love walking into our shop when there's a group of dudes in the back chilling & talking about bikes. It gives the store a better vibe than "welcome to our dull & boring bike shop."
You could even capitalize off of having a small concession stand or vending machines in this area.

4. And I hate to throw this out there, but unfortunately it is a fact..
SCOOTERS. Fucking scooters.
They are quite literally the biggest money-making, rideable objects in the action sports industry. There are certain private-owned skateparks in the U.S. that literally keep their doors open by selling "pro" model scooters.
Every kid wants one, and most parents can actually afford them or find them to be less dangerous than a bicycle.
I'm not saying you should stoop so low as to sell scooters, but if you're interested in making easy money that you can then use to fund BMX-related stuff, well that's the most fool-proof way to do it.

5. Host events from your shop!
Road bikers love getting together at a bike shop and going for massive group rides. Hosting said rides once a month or so will bring lots of customers your way & help create a solid reputation for your shop. Not to mention, when you get so many bike riders together, they tend to want to spend money!
You should also definitely do BMX events, but I wouldn't focus on doing them as often. It may be beneficial for you to keep some mobile ramps around so you can break them out in the parking lot for such events. Things like flat-ledges, up-ledges, a-frames, kickers, flat rails, etc. are what kids would be looking to ride.

And lastly, the golden rule;
If you're doing this hoping to make a living from it, you're likely going to be disappointed..
If you're doing it because you love bikes, then there's a fair chance that you can make it to the point of making a living from it, but it sure as hell won't be easy.

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Refs : SnM An1mal, GThompson121, Chuck8273, blizzbikes, bmxsteve99, kevin.brock.338, zinum, Brian_Griffin, billyhandyjunior, riverM, tomdon
Instagram : @timhankinsbmx


2/10/2019 8:09 AM

grumpySteve wrote:

Most distro's won't even talk to you until you have a shop. There's a reason bmx shops are dying. They simply can't compete with online shops.

I looked into myself. It would cost a good 20k to open, stay open, refit, and stock a shop. Then you have to sell the equivalent of an aftermarket frame every day just to stay open.

I'm not trying to put you off. It's just the reality of it.

So how would i have a shop if i don't have a distro shipping to me first? Because this does seem to be the case. They want me established first, but idk how to fill the shop up without them...

I'm also trying to approach this a little different than maybe the regular bmx dude. My city is infested with college kids all year and each year they are different kids. The clothing in bmx (which is siiiiick) is hidden behind the idea that you have to bike to wear the stuff, and i don't want that to be the case.

So what I'm saying is, maybe my store could be almost opposite. Try to push the clothing, accessories and try to convert non bikers that like the clothes possibly into bmxers! Attract everyone not just kids that ride bikes.

Just throwing out ideas and trying to start a conversation. Also, I'm by no means saying i have to do it or can, but something has to change in the industry and this idea of thinking, that its dead, is not good. We already know this and have to come up with a way to change things up.

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2/10/2019 8:16 AM

HardBMX_Tim wrote:

Profit margins: Expect to break even at the very best, especially if you plan to focus on BMX.
One of my close friends runs our local shop, and he works from 10AM to 10PM+ most days to keep up with the work load, and unfortunately still isn't making enough money to afford full-time help (he is basically a one-man army.)
He tries to focus on BMX (mostly old-school repairs/restores,) but at the end of the day, road bikes are what keeps the shop open.
This is also in the U.S., where we don't have any additional upcharges on bikes & parts. In Canada, the costs of parts are ridiculous, so I'm sure that is damaging to the profit margin.

Here's just a few tips I can think of;

1. Don't focus primarily on BMX or stocking a wide variety of BMX stuff, unless the demand for it becomes present & consistent. BMX is unfortunately like a black-hole when it comes to finances.

2. Advertise heavily towards the road bike scene, they will likely be your #1 customers. And who knows? Maybe when their kids are of age, they may bring them into your shop to check out a BMX.

3. Create a "hang-out spot" inside your shop where riders can lounge, buy a drink, rest up, etc. This gives the shop a good friendly vibe. I know from experience that customers love walking into our shop when there's a group of dudes in the back chilling & talking about bikes. It gives the store a better vibe than "welcome to our dull & boring bike shop."
You could even capitalize off of having a small concession stand or vending machines in this area.

4. And I hate to throw this out there, but unfortunately it is a fact..
SCOOTERS. Fucking scooters.
They are quite literally the biggest money-making, rideable objects in the action sports industry. There are certain private-owned skateparks in the U.S. that literally keep their doors open by selling "pro" model scooters.
Every kid wants one, and most parents can actually afford them or find them to be less dangerous than a bicycle.
I'm not saying you should stoop so low as to sell scooters, but if you're interested in making easy money that you can then use to fund BMX-related stuff, well that's the most fool-proof way to do it.

5. Host events from your shop!
Road bikers love getting together at a bike shop and going for massive group rides. Hosting said rides once a month or so will bring lots of customers your way & help create a solid reputation for your shop. Not to mention, when you get so many bike riders together, they tend to want to spend money!
You should also definitely do BMX events, but I wouldn't focus on doing them as often. It may be beneficial for you to keep some mobile ramps around so you can break them out in the parking lot for such events. Things like flat-ledges, up-ledges, a-frames, kickers, flat rails, etc. are what kids would be looking to ride.

And lastly, the golden rule;
If you're doing this hoping to make a living from it, you're likely going to be disappointed..
If you're doing it because you love bikes, then there's a fair chance that you can make it to the point of making a living from it, but it sure as hell won't be easy.

Thank you! Lots of info. My heart certainly is in the right place lol I'll sleep behind the damn counter if i have to lol

The scene here is small and struggling, but like i said there is no bmx shop and not a single dude trying to push it. Lots of small groups of riders, but no one is trying to get them together.

I really think my city just needs a small push and it could become a sort of bmx hub in Atlantic Canada. Lots of spots, BEAUTIFUL campus (by beautiful i mean to the bikers eyes lol) and its very easy to get around as the city is bike friendly.

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2/10/2019 8:22 AM

As far as distros go, I've never heard of any issues with signing up with them? I got our local shop hooked up with a bunch of solid BMX brands, and it was as simple as signing up & sending a payment for the products (some distros have a minimum $ amount for the first order.)
They never asked anything regarding the current state of the shop..

Hell, there's even a few brands that have offered to sell me things directly at cost, and I don't have any official affiliation to any bike shop. They were willing to send said products straight to my residence.

Most of the guys working at BMX distros are fellow riders & good people. If you call and talk to them about what you're doing with a good attitude, they will usually go above and beyond to help you out.

They may require that you have proof of your business, meaning you must turn this idea of yours into something official. Even if you haven't acquired a building yet, getting the business started & branded is the first thing you need to do before worrying about anything else.

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Refs : SnM An1mal, GThompson121, Chuck8273, blizzbikes, bmxsteve99, kevin.brock.338, zinum, Brian_Griffin, billyhandyjunior, riverM, tomdon
Instagram : @timhankinsbmx


2/10/2019 8:27 AM

Oh & another thing to keep in mind is that when the weather goes to shit, generally so does business at a bike shop.

Here where I'm at, winter is only a couple months or so, but it still does its damage to the finances at the shop. Not sure what winter looks like up there, but plan on losing a good majority of your business during the cold parts of the year.

When it's cold, people generally aren't riding their bikes. When people aren't riding their bikes, they're not breaking things. & when people aren't breaking things, well there goes your business of repairing & replacing said broken things.

It's very important to be smart with your money during the warmer months, because you're likely going to need it to stay open over the course of the winter.

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Refs : SnM An1mal, GThompson121, Chuck8273, blizzbikes, bmxsteve99, kevin.brock.338, zinum, Brian_Griffin, billyhandyjunior, riverM, tomdon
Instagram : @timhankinsbmx


2/10/2019 8:29 AM

HardBMX_Tim wrote:

As far as distros go, I've never heard of any issues with signing up with them? I got our local shop hooked up with a bunch of solid BMX brands, and it was as simple as signing up & sending a payment for the products (some distros have a minimum $ amount for the first order.)
They never asked anything regarding the current state of the shop..

Hell, there's even a few brands that have offered to sell me things directly at cost, and I don't have any official affiliation to any bike shop. They were willing to send said products straight to my residence.

Most of the guys working at BMX distros are fellow riders & good people. If you call and talk to them about what you're doing with a good attitude, they will usually go above and beyond to help you out.

They may require that you have proof of your business, meaning you must turn this idea of yours into something official. Even if you haven't acquired a building yet, getting the business started & branded is the first thing you need to do before worrying about anything else.

Any distros in particular? I see your in the states, so i should probably hit up the canadian ones first, right? Just wanting to make this work.

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2/10/2019 8:39 AM

Oh & lastly..

You mentioned that there is an indoor skatepark opening near you. You must keep in mind that an indoor skatepark is going to likely have a pro-shop with a decent variety of BMX, Skateboarding, and Scooter parts.

This is direct competition, and unless you've already got a solid reputation, you will likely lose in most instances.

People are simply more likely to spend money at the skatepark to fix their ride while they're already there & it's convenient for them.

Also, I know from experience that parents are more likely to purchase a bike/scooter/skateboard from a skatepark that will let them test ride it & usually will even give them 1 free session for buying from them.


Just an idea, but if I were you, I would reach out to the owner of said indoor park & inquire about paying them rent (and possibly commissions?) to operate your own business as their pro-shop.
Would be really beneficial for you for a number of reasons;
1. You would only have to focus on BMX, Skateboarding, and Scooters, instead of road bikes & hosting events, etc.
2. You would benefit from the skatepark traffic. Any time someone breaks something or just simply wants something new, they will come straight to you.
Etc.

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Refs : SnM An1mal, GThompson121, Chuck8273, blizzbikes, bmxsteve99, kevin.brock.338, zinum, Brian_Griffin, billyhandyjunior, riverM, tomdon
Instagram : @timhankinsbmx


2/10/2019 8:41 AM

HardBMX_Tim wrote:

As far as distros go, I've never heard of any issues with signing up with them? I got our local shop hooked up with a bunch of solid BMX brands, and it was as simple as signing up & sending a payment for the products (some distros have a minimum $ amount for the first order.)
They never asked anything regarding the current state of the shop..

Hell, there's even a few brands that have offered to sell me things directly at cost, and I don't have any official affiliation to any bike shop. They were willing to send said products straight to my residence.

Most of the guys working at BMX distros are fellow riders & good people. If you call and talk to them about what you're doing with a good attitude, they will usually go above and beyond to help you out.

They may require that you have proof of your business, meaning you must turn this idea of yours into something official. Even if you haven't acquired a building yet, getting the business started & branded is the first thing you need to do before worrying about anything else.

Skylar_Ouellette wrote:

Any distros in particular? I see your in the states, so i should probably hit up the canadian ones first, right? Just wanting to make this work.

Eastern has always been one of my favorite companies to deal with & they distribute directly. That means you can hit up Eastern directly to inquire about stocking up, instead of having to reach out to a 3rd party distro.

Black-Out distro is an awesome one with great brands, but I dont know that they distribute to Canada. Would be worth looking into forsure though.

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Refs : SnM An1mal, GThompson121, Chuck8273, blizzbikes, bmxsteve99, kevin.brock.338, zinum, Brian_Griffin, billyhandyjunior, riverM, tomdon
Instagram : @timhankinsbmx


2/10/2019 8:46 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/10/2019 8:50 AM

Don’t do it man , you are going to lose allot of money , Canadian bmx is hurting these days , ten pack is dead , 1664 is dead , transition died , Atlantis died , I’ve heard Norco just baught out MacNeil so who knows how long that will stay alive , kill em all distro, 3 ride and harvester bikes seem to be the only games in town for Canada that’s not dying that’s bmx specific , bike shops sound like a cool idea until your money starts dwindling , if you want to make money your going to have to sell scooter as shitty as that is

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2/10/2019 9:03 AM

And another idea, since it seems like your main focus is bringing your scene together..

I personally started my own small "crew" clothing brand & YouTube channel.
I've heard a lot of hate about it because of how many people do the same thing, but at the end of the day, I've been able to use it to bring my local scene together tighter than it has been in a long long time.

I don't have to worry about paying rent for a building or stocking up on other brands' products. Never stressed about whether or not I'll be able to keep my doors open or be able to compete with other local business.

I simply spent around $3000 up front to start my website, ordered some camera equipment, and got a handful of gimmicky products made.
I technically have 0 responsibilities, I just stay on top of posting content to our social medias/YouTube in my free time.

I know it sounds kind of dull compared to owning your own bike shop, but it has become the perfect outlet for me to bring people together & mold my local scene into a great big family.

Here is the video of our 2nd ever bike jam that we hosted as "Capital Crew", we accumulated 200+ riders, raffled off a custom bike to a kid in need, grilled up BBQ for everyone that came, and just had an all around good weekend with our entire scene and then some.
Now coming up on 1 year later, I cannot even fathom the amount of kids in my scene that are pursuing BMX and getting into BMX because they want to be a part of our annual jams every year, or because when they "grow up they want to be a part of Capital Crew."
Our scene literally went from 0 to 100 real quick just by us hosting events and making silly YouTube videos.

Not to mention, if I were to decide to start my own bike shop/skatepark, I'm already in tight with all of the brands and distros that sponsor our events. As I mentioned before, a few popular brands would literally send me products to my residence at cost if need be.

Not saying it's a great way to make money, but it is a fantastic way to bring your scene together & make a name for yourself.

Feel free to check out my site, it may give you some ideas! capitalcrewbmx.com

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Refs : SnM An1mal, GThompson121, Chuck8273, blizzbikes, bmxsteve99, kevin.brock.338, zinum, Brian_Griffin, billyhandyjunior, riverM, tomdon
Instagram : @timhankinsbmx


2/10/2019 9:03 AM

Distributors:

Ryder

ODGC

Kill Em All

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2/10/2019 7:50 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/10/2019 7:51 PM

grumpySteve wrote:

Most distro's won't even talk to you until you have a shop. There's a reason bmx shops are dying. They simply can't compete with online shops.

I looked into myself. It would cost a good 20k to open, stay open, refit, and stock a shop. Then you have to sell the equivalent of an aftermarket frame every day just to stay open.

I'm not trying to put you off. It's just the reality of it.

Skylar_Ouellette wrote:

So how would i have a shop if i don't have a distro shipping to me first? Because this does seem to be the case. They want me established first, but idk how to fill the shop up without them...

I'm also trying to approach this a little different than maybe the regular bmx dude. My city is infested with college kids all year and each year they are different kids. The clothing in bmx (which is siiiiick) is hidden behind the idea that you have to bike to wear the stuff, and i don't want that to be the case.

So what I'm saying is, maybe my store could be almost opposite. Try to push the clothing, accessories and try to convert non bikers that like the clothes possibly into bmxers! Attract everyone not just kids that ride bikes.

Just throwing out ideas and trying to start a conversation. Also, I'm by no means saying i have to do it or can, but something has to change in the industry and this idea of thinking, that its dead, is not good. We already know this and have to come up with a way to change things up.

You have to find premises, and start renting it. Then apply to the distro to stock their stuff. The shop will probably need re fitting in some way anyway. So you'd be looking at spending a couple of months on rent before you can even open the doors. If the distro already deal with a shop that's close by, they won't deal with you too either.

Online is where the bmx sales are. I know 2 guys that own bmx shops. One is very limited with what he has online, and is basically still only open because he does pre-orders for sought after stuff via dedicated Facebook pages (the metal kiss reissue is a perfect example). The other deals mostly online. There's so many established core bmx shops closing down, opening another just seems like a bad idea.

I've looked into this as there will be a massive indoor concrete skatepark 5 minutes walk from my flat later this year. But without something additional, it won't make money. Scooters will help. But bmx clothing is expensive, I can't see non bmxers paying the money for brands they've never heard of.
My plan was to open a bmx coffee shop, and sell some skateboard stuff too. If I sell my flat I can afford to do it. But coffee would probably be what keeps it open.

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2/11/2019 12:29 AM

All good ideas in here, but I'm kinda surprised no one suggested you catering to the MTB/DJ market yet. I thought that's what you guys were about up there in Canada? Guarantee that's where alot of your business will come from as well

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2/11/2019 3:07 AM

-Havok- wrote:

All good ideas in here, but I'm kinda surprised no one suggested you catering to the MTB/DJ market yet. I thought that's what you guys were about up there in Canada? Guarantee that's where alot of your business will come from as well

I had the idea of a custom cycle shop, catering for all cycling, but focusing on upgrading and customising, and steering clear of completes. It would have aftermarket parts for all types of bikes, groupsets, sus forks, fixie parts etc. With the plan that there'd always be a bike in the repair stand having parts changed. Labour is the real money earner for bike shops, so I'd be offering strip and rebuild/upgrade services.
As I said early, a core bmx shop has to sell the equivalent of at least a frame a day just to stay open. You could make a lot more doing a couple of basic services a day, and aren't excluding anyone with a bike. Bmxers don't pay for repairs or to have parts fitted, so there's no money in it at all from that perspective

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2/11/2019 5:11 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/11/2019 5:40 AM

A guy I know ran his shop out of his garage for like 5 years, THEN got into a building. He let it close, then his BMX riding son (a buddy of mine- RIP Kris) was killed in a car accident. He was traveling for a different work gig and it reset his want to be home for family.

Restarted the shop with a coffee shop as a part of the business (which I always told him I wanted to do back in the day-maybe that was part of his idea?) and he is doing pretty well (small town of like 10-15K people and no major coffee shop brands locally).

He has his sons old bikes mounted on the walls in memory of him/as decorations.

Also, you would create a business/get licensed correctly, then reach out to the distros and get things going. Keep in mind there are territory agreements you would need to ask about-certain brands will not allow competing shops to be too close together and carry the same brands-example would be Specialized has territory agreements, same with Cannondale, Giant, Santa Cruz and so on.

Service is the bread and butter of any shop. Know all that in and out. Carry parts and tools for all kinds of bikes. Have a fair amount of whatever your local area has a lot of locations for-IE if you are close to a mountain bike trail, carry a lot of mountain bike stuff. If you are near a dirt jump park, carry towards that in the MTB and BMX world, but ALWAYS have bikes for all aspects of riding.

Also scooters. They are cheap and kids EAT EM UP. Seriously. Get a reputable brand and sell the hell out of em.

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I am sick and tired of the "cliques" that this sport has recently developed. We should embrace the fact that we all ride a little kids bike, and not worry about the small details. When you take riding in its most basic form, we are all the same.

2/11/2019 7:39 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/11/2019 7:41 AM

As already said, you need to sell what's selling. Unfortunately, that is NOT BMX.... at least, in general, it is not what shops typically survive on. That said, if you want to have BMX stock & build that up while selling other segments of bicycling (road, MTB, scooters, etc...) that is something you could try & something I would recommend as opposed to jumping "all in" on just BMX. As I assume this is a serious proposal, you really should evaluate what you are proposing. While you might love BMX, or just bicycles in general, that is not necessarily a reason to open a shop. You need to realize that it is a business, first and foremost. Income and profits are what will drive the business & allow you to make a living and expand the business. & just like other companies, like Kink, Mongoose, Eastern, etc... you will have to sell lower end completes more than you sell high-end customs. That's pretty much standard across the bicycle industry.

Lastly, you should know business, in general. Overhead, other than product can kill you. For instance (as stated before), bike service is where a lot of the profits are generated. As such, you will need to have the expertise in that area if you are to be taken seriously by customers. & that is not something you can fake for very long. You can't just hire a bunch of high school kids & expect them to know anything about proper bicycle maintenance. If you can't be the "go-to" guy for bicycle maintenance because you either don't have the time (because you are selling, or otherwise running the business) then you will have to hire someone to do that. & that isn't cheap. A good mechanic is worth paying for. Unfortunately, more often than not, bike shops don't realize this & try to get by with very little experience "in the back". I have a close friend who owns a shop. He (and his brother) inherited the business from their father. & by "inherited", I mean they had to buy out their father.... basically buy the business, like anyone else (which is also an option you could pursue, if you wanted). They had BMX as a segment but were killed by the online retailers. They do alright but they have been in it for decades and the business was established before they took over. They both routinely work 10 hour days 5 days a week & 8 on Saturdays. They also sell and maintain fitness equipment to help subsidize the "bike shop" side during the winter months (here, in Wisconsin, we don't have the luxury of great bike-riding weather for approx. 6 months a year).

So, to sum up. you should really be looking at this as a money-making business. & that is it's SOLE PURPOSE. Sure, helping to build up the BMX scene is great but that isn't going to make you money & unless you are independently wealthy, THAT must be your focus. I'm sorry to sound so negative. I don't mean to be pissing on your dream. I just want you to realize all the "in's & out's" of this, in case you haven't really thought it thru. &, BTW, I just barely scratched the surface.

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2/11/2019 8:01 AM

Some years ago it was normal that people visited their local shop and bought what the shop had - but now people want the exact part from the exact brand in the exact size and colour ... it's impossible to have every new part in every colour and size as a local BMX shop ...

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2/11/2019 8:02 AM

-Havok- wrote:

All good ideas in here, but I'm kinda surprised no one suggested you catering to the MTB/DJ market yet. I thought that's what you guys were about up there in Canada? Guarantee that's where alot of your business will come from as well

grumpySteve wrote:

I had the idea of a custom cycle shop, catering for all cycling, but focusing on upgrading and customising, and steering clear of completes. It would have aftermarket parts for all types of bikes, groupsets, sus forks, fixie parts etc. With the plan that there'd always be a bike in the repair stand having parts changed. Labour is the real money earner for bike shops, so I'd be offering strip and rebuild/upgrade services.
As I said early, a core bmx shop has to sell the equivalent of at least a frame a day just to stay open. You could make a lot more doing a couple of basic services a day, and aren't excluding anyone with a bike. Bmxers don't pay for repairs or to have parts fitted, so there's no money in it at all from that perspective

That sounds very much like this place:
https://www.wrenchscience.com/

I used to live down the street from them. At that time, they did nothing but build high end custom bikes and wheelsets. They focused only on MTB and road in the $4500+ value range.

They survived the financial crash and still seem to be in business, so it's probably a more viable strategy than others. However, those guys were experts at bike fitting and had tons of training and specialized (not the brand) equipment to do custom fittings. I think getting credibility in that space would be completely essential to making it work.

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2/11/2019 8:03 AM

vie4130 wrote:

Some years ago it was normal that people visited their local shop and bought what the shop had - but now people want the exact part from the exact brand in the exact size and colour ... it's impossible to have every new part in every colour and size as a local BMX shop ...

This is something I thought about too. There's certain parts you know will sell. Like odyssey forks, because they seem to be the go to forks. But what frames would you stock? There's just too much to choose from, and every rider knows what they want

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2/11/2019 9:36 AM

maybe start a crew / club first. start holding jams and what not to help build the scene and get the bmx folks on the same hype cloud thingy.

then slowly go from there..

opening a bar would probably be a better business. people always want to drink.

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2/15/2019 12:58 PM

Thanks everyone for your input! I have been away for the last week and came back to a lot of insight. So I’m thinking everyone here agrees that a bmx shop alone is not going to work.

So I’m going to mock something up to see if I should go purely bikes (road, mountain), or towards scooters and such.

Really like the idea of working right in/ with the new skatepark being built, great idea!

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2/15/2019 2:40 PM

Wait? What? Bmx isn’t seling? Fuck I just bought 3 different frames, two sets of cranks, 3 different bars, 3 sets of pedals, 8 total pegs, 10 sleeves, 2 seats, 2 posts, one set of wheels, 6 tires, 5 tubes and the list goes on in less than 3 months. Bmx isnt seling? Albes said they had the best year ever in 2018. Bmx isnt selling? I’m confused.

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2/15/2019 2:52 PM

Indoor park with a shop is prob the best bet in canada with the winters, ye the only shop in tronto is now gone 3ride makes it more difficult to get noticed seriously as a rider without a local bike shop no ?

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2/15/2019 11:17 PM

BillyBigRigger wrote:

Wait? What? Bmx isn’t seling? Fuck I just bought 3 different frames, two sets of cranks, 3 different bars, 3 sets of pedals, 8 total pegs, 10 sleeves, 2 seats, 2 posts, one set of wheels, 6 tires, 5 tubes and the list goes on in less than 3 months. Bmx isnt seling? Albes said they had the best year ever in 2018. Bmx isnt selling? I’m confused.

The mark up is small, and not many riders are buying that many parts in a short period of time. The profit from those sleeves probably isn't enough to buy a coffee. Those 3 frames? Probably about enough to keep the shop open for 3 days, or pay a part timers wages for a week

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2/16/2019 12:40 AM

BillyBigRigger wrote:

Wait? What? Bmx isn’t seling? Fuck I just bought 3 different frames, two sets of cranks, 3 different bars, 3 sets of pedals, 8 total pegs, 10 sleeves, 2 seats, 2 posts, one set of wheels, 6 tires, 5 tubes and the list goes on in less than 3 months. Bmx isnt seling? Albes said they had the best year ever in 2018. Bmx isnt selling? I’m confused.

Might be in reference to mom and pop. Not online sales with warehouse distribution.

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2/16/2019 8:26 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/16/2019 8:29 AM

Notrickfix wrote:

Indoor park with a shop is prob the best bet in canada with the winters, ye the only shop in tronto is now gone 3ride makes it more difficult to get noticed seriously as a rider without a local bike shop no ?

Indoor parks struggle to survive in Canada allot of times because they only see business half the year , as soon as snow melts they turn into ghost towns , one in Edmonton the boneyard just closed it only lasted a year , joyride seems like the only one that has lasted more than a couple years , and another point to add there isn’t as much bmx or skateboarding going on anymore , it’s scooters everywhere , and everyone knows anyone who rides a scooter isn’t old enough to have a job to make money to pay to ride indoor skateparks

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