Decent bike for both flatland and trails?

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11/17/2015 10:35 AM

First post here, so I apologise if anything is in the wrong place. My problem is this: I bought a mongoose program (not the best I know, but it was cheap) back in 2007 or 8 with the intention of taking up bmx. However, what with school work and me being generally lazy, I never really got round to it. This summer I started getting back into it, and am really enjoying it. I feel like now is the time to change my bike as the mongoose is old, heavy and if I land with slightly too much pressure on the handlebars they slip forward, no matter how tight the nuts are.

Currently, I am building dirt jumps which is really what got me back into bmxing, however when I'm waiting for the jumps to set/dry, I do a bit of flatland too.

My first question is this, is there a difference between a dirt bmx and a flatland/freestyle one? Ideally, I would like one single bmx which could be used for both (removing and adding pegs as necessary), not sure if this is possible.

Secondly, (and I think I know the answer to this one) is it worth keeping any parts at all from the mongoose program, or should I just go for a new bike entirely? If so what bikes would be good for me?

Finally, at what point does price really not make that much difference? I mean I'm looking for a decent bike which will last, but not looking to pay thousands. Is £500 a decent budget?

I look forward to any replies, and if you need any more information or I have done something wrong in this post, let me know, I'm happy to help.

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11/17/2015 10:59 AM

Full chromoly frame fork bar
Double wall rims
Sealed hubs
Mid Bottom Bracket
Integrated headset
3pc crank

Anything with all that should treat you fine. You can also look for higher quality features such as welded rims, female axle (FA) hubs, CNC Machined stem, 48-spline cranks, etc.

As for geometry, Flatland and Trails are on two separate ends of the spectrum, however that does not mean that you won't enjoy riding both either way you go. Flatland specific parts may not be strong enough for some sorts of riding though.

I would personally aim for something around this ball park to suit both styles of riding, although you may be better suit for something else.

13.35-13.75 cs
75-74.75hta
8-8.5"soh
11.6-11.7bbh
170-175mm cranks
48-51mm stem

Hope that helps.

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Refs : SnM An1mal, GThompson121, Chuck8273, blizzbikes, bmxsteve99, kevin.brock.338, zinum, Brian_Griffin, billyhandyjunior, riverM, tomdon
Instagram : @timhankinsbmx


11/17/2015 12:00 PM

Honestly if you are doing both, I would figure which one you ride more often, and cater a little more toward that.

The above post has good info, but it may be overwhelming to someone who doesn't know what they want specifically or who isn't as far into the sport. Do you have local shops nearby? If so, pop by one and check out some bikes. See what feels nice to ride.

You can adapt a bike from one end to suit the other (dirt to flatland etc). Do you run front and rear brakes? No brakes?

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"Hey anybody ever make that mistake like right when you wake up in the morning and you believe in yourself?" -Kyle Kinane

"BIKES!" -Tom Segura

11/17/2015 12:51 PM

Thanks for the replies, I'm kind of leaning more towards flatland - more riding, less digging. While in the ideal situation I would like to do both, it is not essential.

I have been running both front and rear brakes.

There is one shop near me which I will have a look in tomorrow, hopefully speaking to the assistant will be useful as well.

Thanks for your help

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11/22/2015 3:00 AM

Would the wethepeople crysis work well for both?

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11/22/2015 3:10 AM

As stated above, they're both very different styles of riding. For trails you want something stable, so long rear end, mellow head angle, long toptube. And fairly light, nice wide bars with plenty of sweep, and normal offset on your forks.
For flatland you'd want the opposite of that. Something very nimble, 4 pegs, and you've already mentioned a front brake, and a gyro. Short rear end, short toptube, small bars with little to no sweep, short stem, little to no offset on the forks. The extra parts on a flatland bike would add unnecessary weight for trails. And trails geometry would make flatland very hard.
It really would be easier to concentrate on one, or have 2 bikes.

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11/22/2015 3:22 AM

Ok thanks for the reply, I guess I'll concentrate on flatland. I was hopeful that one bike would be able to suit both and I could save a bit of money, but it looks like I'm just going have to forget about trails for the meantime.

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11/22/2015 8:02 AM

EssEllDee wrote:

Ok thanks for the reply, I guess I'll concentrate on flatland. I was hopeful that one bike would be able to suit both and I could save a bit of money, but it looks like I'm just going have to forget about trails for the meantime.

I don't ride them often, but I do play around with both flatland and trails occasionally. The geometry of your bike is NOT going to stop you from doing so, might just make it a bit more challenging. As I said, pick something somewhere in the middle, and let both be equally as challenging, and enjoy yourself.

I can do Rocket 1440s occasionally on my 21.5" 13.5" (more similar to trails than flatland) just fine. I also suck at riding trails, even though my bike is set up to do well on trails.

Don't let some guy on the internet tell you what your bike can and cannot do. It's not about the bike- the bike will do whatever you make it do.

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Refs : SnM An1mal, GThompson121, Chuck8273, blizzbikes, bmxsteve99, kevin.brock.338, zinum, Brian_Griffin, billyhandyjunior, riverM, tomdon
Instagram : @timhankinsbmx


11/22/2015 3:11 PM

I ride both and I have the colony endavour frame with odyssey lite and wasp hubs and it's great

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11/23/2015 6:52 AM

"The extra parts on a flatland bike would add unnecessary weight for trails"

Ryan Nyquist is a coaster away from a functional flatland setup.

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"Hey anybody ever make that mistake like right when you wake up in the morning and you believe in yourself?" -Kyle Kinane

"BIKES!" -Tom Segura

11/23/2015 11:52 AM
Edited Date/Time: 11/23/2015 11:54 AM

dave lawrence wrote:

"The extra parts on a flatland bike would add unnecessary weight for trails"

Ryan Nyquist is a coaster away from a functional flatland setup.

Good for him. That's a bit irrelevant though as he's more of a trick guy than a flow guy? I don't think I remember ever seeing pegs or a gyro on Clint Reynolds bikes.....


Someone said above that you can do what you want with your bike. I agree, you should build a bike that's suitable for you and your riding style. It's just that you will have to make compromises, that will effect how your bike feels for different types of riding

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