Street frames on trails?

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6/18/2017 10:58 AM

There aren't really any threads that answer this specifically but I do need a bit on advice on this:

Basically, I want to ride pretty much mostly trails, i'm 5 foot 7, still growing and I was wanting to know if you can get away with a 13" cs and a but a longer 21" tt to make up for a shorter rear?

Also i dont want all the focus on this part but is 75.25 headtube angle to steep, I prefer around a 2.35 tyre, so should it not be an issue?

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Trails not Rails

Trails YT Channel

6/18/2017 11:00 AM

You'll be fine.

There is no street frame or park frame, just frames ran by street riders and park riders under branding that favors one of the two styles.

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Scooter kid trying to ride a bike.
@scootereyn

6/18/2017 11:05 AM

readybmxer wrote:

You'll be fine.

There is no street frame or park frame, just frames ran by street riders and park riders under branding that ...more

thanks for replying, but do you think that if you have a longer tt but shorter cs then you will get alot more pop or spring but with stability?

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Trails not Rails

Trails YT Channel

6/18/2017 11:13 AM
Edited Date/Time: 6/18/2017 11:19 AM

As long as you are comfortable on your ride, that's pretty much the only thing that matter.
It's better to ride trails with a "street oriented" frame that you are used to than switching to a 14"+ chainstays frame and longer top toptube only because it's "better for trails" it will be more stable for sure but will you handle that bike as good ?

I am 6'1 riding a 21.4" tt for a 13.2" chainstays (13" slammed) because I like a roomy and stable bike while still keeping it reactive.
So same kind of ride than your 21"/13" for 5'7 I'm fully able to ride some jumps with it.

Big tyres aren't an issue, it's even the opposite, big tyres are stable, stability is good for trails.
And if you are really worried about this 75.25° head tube angle, get a longer offset fork, or cheaper get a thinner back tyre, it will make your head tube angle more mellow (a combo like 2.1"/ 2.4" is perfect)

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6/18/2017 12:00 PM

A short back end and steep headangle might feel pretty squirrely for trails. Hell, I only ride street and I prefer a good 13.5" chainstay and 74.5 headangle

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6/18/2017 12:08 PM

13.5 with a 75 head tube is perfect for everything. Why not just get something that will feel good on whatever your riding?

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6/18/2017 1:33 PM

Helpful to see your thoughts, so Ive been looking at a bunch of frames and theres this volume broc raiford sig, I ride around my village alot, no spots or park but its what i do when we cant ride trails, so it should be good for an all round especially if you prefer a slightly more street spec.

volume broc raiford frame

75 head tube
9.25 SO
13.5 centre dropout, with chain tensioners so i can get a bit longer if i needed
21 tt, I'm thinking longer just so i have a bit more stability even though im 5"7, still growing but when i stop i should be 6 or just less. Hopefully that will make up for a slightly shorter back end.

I have a friend who's looking at the 2 short when his skills are progressing in the trail riding area, He is a bit younger but i'm gonna have to persuade him to not get it because a 12.5, slammed cs is dangerous on the trails, also the 75.7 head tube

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Trails not Rails

Trails YT Channel

6/18/2017 1:46 PM

12.5 on trails is just crazy. I thought I liked my fit benny for a while, until I got my volume mystery machine. The Benny has a 13" chainstaiy with 75.5 ht. Mystery machine is 13.5 with a 75 head tube. I really like trail riding too, but really spend most of my time at the skatepark. I feel like my hops got a lot higher, when I got the longer back end. I also got bars that are about an inch taller, so it feels just as easy to pull up, but I feel like I have more pop now. Everything just feels right. I'm actually running it at 13.75, now that I think about it. So glad I took a chance with this frame. I wasn't even planning on keeping it until I took it for a ride.

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6/18/2017 1:52 PM

Generally trail riders like to ride a more relaxed head tube angle '74.5 etc.' Because sometimes on trails you move pretty fast and with a not so steep head angle it is easier to turn on burms or any trail while moving fast. Street frames have a steeper head angle because most street riders like responsive turning and it helps with tech style. Rear end length really is personal preferance too, but with a longer chainstay than modern street frames '13.5 etc' might give u advantage of adjusting your pitch while in the air to land or set up for the next obsticle. Ride around on friends bikes and see what fits you best for your style

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6/18/2017 1:58 PM
Edited Date/Time: 6/18/2017 2:03 PM

The Broc Raiford frame is a good all around frame that would suit your riding well.

Going for over 21" isn't a bad idea considering your riding plans and your height, plus you are growing (the Raiford frames also comes in 21.25")
Edit: I just checked how tall 5'7 is (I use metric system usually) and for now 21" seem to be your perfect size, 21.25" will be perfect for around 6', the choice might depend on how fast you'll grow.

For you friend, as I said before the most important thing is to be comfortable on your bike but frames like the 2 short or the alvx are a bit extreme and not really suitable for trail riding, it would be a handicap more than anything.

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6/18/2017 3:28 PM

IMO it's all up to your preference. Good riders can ride anything on everything. That being said, a shorter CS will give you much less room for error on landings that are less than perfect. The shorter the CS the easier it is to loop out as you know. Like I said, and everyone knows, you can ride whatever you prefer, but if you look at the needs of different disciplines/terrains you will notice a trend in frame size for each. Need more stability at a higher speed, longer CS with a more mellow HT angle. Need quick response or to spin faster, steeper HT angle and a shorter rear end will help.

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6/19/2017 7:41 PM

it might be a bit twitchy in the air or at speed but you'll be fine

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Honestly? Who gives a shit. Its the fucking internet. I hate all of you equally.
-HardBMX_Tim

6/19/2017 8:06 PM

If you already have the bike, then yeah of course it's fine. If your planning on buying a new bike, and ride mostly trails, you should definitely look at a trails specific bike. Which is it?

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6/20/2017 6:42 AM

I don't really agree that you should have a long frame for trails. Keep in mind that I ride trails very little. This means that I suck at trails haha. But I had a soundwave which is 13.75 or something like that, I bought an alvx and it felt way better on jumps and trails. It was easier to control and easier to correct in the air if you messed up the jump. My soundwave felt like a boat in the air. It was really hard to get the bike to land how I wanted it to. Also keep in mind that depending on what you are riding now, 21 may be too big. Im 5'10" and ride a 20.75. 21 feels massive to me. To each their own though.

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6/20/2017 4:07 PM

big jumps = bigger wheel base. it's basic physics. if you're on smaller jumps it's not much different than a skatepark. Start hitting some man sized jumps and you'll start to see that a longer back end and longer wheelbase is better.

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6/21/2017 9:50 AM
Edited Date/Time: 6/21/2017 9:52 AM

pnj wrote:

big jumps = bigger wheel base. it's basic physics. if you're on smaller jumps it's not much different than a skatepark. Start ...more

I'm sure your right. I even notice a difference on small jumps myself. I notice the tiniest adjustments on my bike though, so 3/4 inch is huge for me.

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6/21/2017 10:06 AM

I'd say you'd be fine, my friend has ridden trails on a BTM before (20.75" tt, 13" chainstay)

I plan on building up a trail rig with a 13.5" chainstay and I don't see the need to go any bigger

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