Switching to 24"+

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12/1/2019 12:12 PM

I rode on and off for years thought out childhood and early adulthood. My last rides being a 20.5 mirraco and a 10.75 s&m dirt bike. They were fine and all while they lasted but I am 36 now, I'm 6'2" now and almost 250lbs. I really want to get back into all-around riding while still being able to grind curbs I feel the desire to. I know that I want a 24". I've found a few in market place for great costs (2 Sunday model C's) and (stollen dinner xlt). I want to keel it as under $400 as I can and have whatever time I want to upgrade as I go. Thanks fam.

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12/1/2019 1:00 PM
Edited Date/Time: 12/1/2019 1:28 PM

Have you thought about a 22" bike? All the room of a 24 but much more responsive and less clunky. 24s are fun but I've found 22s feel much more like a 20" without the twitchyness.

Out of the bikes you mentioned I would buy the Sinner if it's in good shape. The Sundays are not chromoly unless they are the older aftermarket frame.

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12/1/2019 2:01 PM

For sure look into the 22 inch wheel bikes.

24's are cool but often have a smaller cockpit / top tube so you end up cramped on them. and the larger tire can run into your front foot.

and if for some reason you find a good deal on a 20 inch, get something with a 21.25 inch top tube or longer.

36 ain't shit.... wink have fun and welcome back.

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12/1/2019 2:32 PM

My largest hold back is thati am all legs. Originally I was going to do 26". I talked myself down from that ledge. I can get a super relative 22" to get started on but know at my weight what I do I know that I will end up bending a lot right away, especially once I really start throwing down. What do you guys ride with what size you are?!?

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12/1/2019 3:27 PM

I'm 6'2" and 225 pounds. I ride va WTP 20 and a Fit 22. I used to ride a 24" WTP Atlas but don't anymore since getting the 22.

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12/1/2019 5:58 PM

I'm not even going to chance a 20 and not only from fram size but I will be a lot harder on rims too. Like I said I'm not trying to break the bank. I still have to pay of probation for the first time in my life...I know framed has a 22 for 260 or if you can find the pro version 320....what else?!?

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12/1/2019 6:03 PM
Edited Date/Time: 12/1/2019 6:04 PM

Pretty sure 20" wheels are typically stronger than anything bigger... FWIW..

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12/1/2019 6:09 PM

Black Swamp Ghost wrote:

Pretty sure 20" wheels are typically stronger than anything bigger... FWIW..

Maybe when they used to be 48 count and everybody in the game decided to not take care of their bodies and make stuff cheap and light

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12/1/2019 6:21 PM

Bottom line is I fo not trust the ,22'smosg recommnd. There's 4 of so 24s that i can get a ahold of new and used. I've ran across 2 Sunday model C's chrome 300 grey 275,

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12/1/2019 10:35 PM

Anyone that says you can’t shred on a 24 is retarded. Get a model c and SHRED!!!!

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fack off

12/1/2019 11:22 PM

Model Cs are hiten steel. I asked Sunday what they are made from and they wouldn't tell me just that they are hiten. Pretty much the whole bike is hiten.
I think maybe the down tube and the steer tube of the fork are chromo and that's it. The Sinner you mentioned is the same geometry but full chromoly.
22s ride way better than 24s. They feel perfect to me but if I was going to get a 24 it would be the Sinner XLT or the Colony Eclipse. All the other 24" complete bikes out there except the 2 mentioned and the WTP Atlas are either not full chromoly or have single wall rims.

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12/1/2019 11:28 PM

The Sinner is a 20" bike. I thought we were talking about the Saint XLT for some reason. Sorry. Got confused.

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12/2/2019 2:33 AM

adamnmexican wrote:

Anyone that says you can’t shred on a 24 is retarded. Get a model c and SHRED!!!!

Both of my options of those are deals.

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12/2/2019 4:15 AM

Black Swamp Ghost wrote:

Pretty sure 20" wheels are typically stronger than anything bigger... FWIW..

James_Gadd wrote:

Maybe when they used to be 48 count and everybody in the game decided to not take care of their bodies and make stuff cheap and light

48's were rad, but unnecessary weight etc for most riders. If you are landing sideways all day long and trying whips and slamming your wheel sideways on the ground, then yea, you would want 48s. Although a well built set of 36's would take that and likely need a light truing from time to time.

At my heaviest I was knocking on the 285 ballpark, 6 feet tall. My 36H demilition Zeros are second hand and still true after 3-ish years I have had them.

I had a set of Zeroes before that (red) that I laced new, trued them twice in a couple years purely because I worked in a shop and had access to every bike related tool necessary to keep it DIALED, so I did.

Besides, technology has advanced a TON since the era of 48's being common. Look at frames, a typical frame now is around 2 lbs lighter than they were back then, and look what they are handling in comparison. A modern frame would handle everything dished out back in the early 00's without issue. Forks as well. Everything has gotten lighter while still maintaining the same (or better) strength.

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12/2/2019 10:07 AM

James_Gadd wrote:

Maybe when they used to be 48 count and everybody in the game decided to not take care of their bodies and make stuff cheap and light

Take 2 pencils: one long, one short. Which is going to be easier to break? Every spoke in a wheel is like one of those pencils, always trying to snap off at the head.

To add to that: if you use 36 spokes on a larger wheel, the nipple holes in the rim have to be further apart, meaning more unsupported material between each nipple.

20" BMX wheels are incredibly strong and if they are well-built from good quality components and maintained properly, they could outlast you.

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12/2/2019 11:50 AM

Black Swamp Ghost wrote:

Pretty sure 20" wheels are typically stronger than anything bigger... FWIW..

James_Gadd wrote:

Maybe when they used to be 48 count and everybody in the game decided to not take care of their bodies and make stuff cheap and light

p1p1092 wrote:

Take 2 pencils: one long, one short. Which is going to be easier to break? Every spoke in a wheel is like one of those pencils, always trying to snap off at the head.

To add to that: if you use 36 spokes on a larger wheel, the nipple holes in the rim have to be further apart, meaning more unsupported material between each nipple.

20" BMX wheels are incredibly strong and if they are well-built from good quality components and maintained properly, they could outlast you.

I don't even remember why this even turned to be about wheels. That's one of the last reasons that I want a 24". I want it for length, ride height so that I can pedal sitting down, and comfort.

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12/2/2019 12:50 PM

you can raise the seat on a 20. look at any bmx bike from the 80's.... haha


I suggest you pedal some bikes. see what feels good to you.

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12/2/2019 2:20 PM

James_Gadd wrote:

I don't even remember why this even turned to be about wheels. That's one of the last reasons that I want a 24". I want it for length, ride height so that I can pedal sitting down, and comfort.

It started to be about wheels when you wrote this..

"I'm not even going to chance a 20 and not only from fram size but I will be a lot harder on rims too."

I just trying to help by pointing out that 20" wheels are actually stronger.

Then you started to argue with the LAWS of physics..

I'm not saying you can't shred on a 24, but the likely hood of getting a rim taco increases exponentially.

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