The term "Custom"

Related:
Create New Tag

2/9/2020 4:06 PM

Just thinking out loud here...

Can a complete bike ever be called a custom, and if so, when?

Is a custom aftermarket frame with all parts from a complete, custom?

Just curious as to how everyone uses the term "custom"

My complete (Kink Williams) came with mostly aftermarket level parts, and there's not many customs I'd wanna trade it for bike for bike..

I see bikes on Craigslist that look like complete rigs with some different grips and pedals and to they call em custom...

|

2/9/2020 5:45 PM

Maybe a custom that starts out as a complete could be called a custom complete and a custom thats 100% custom could be called a complete custom.

|

2/9/2020 6:33 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/9/2020 6:34 PM

I never thought about this. XD

I do agree with Bullet, as adding parts to a pre-built "stock" complete bike could be a custom complete. But yeah, idk how you'd go about calling a complete that features aftermarket stuff, but I'm leaning towards complete rather than custom complete, since it's how you bought it.

My guess is that some people use "custom" as short for customized, as in, by putting different pedals, grips, or chain, it becomes customized.

I think the term for a 100% ground-up build would be custom build?

But I dunno, lol.

|

Scooter kid trying to ride a bike. Instagram: @scootereyn // YouTube: RH MEDIA

2/9/2020 8:32 PM

Colloquially, the term custom references the fact that the bike and especially the frame were built with aftermarket parts. This is an important distinction because a lot of completes have frames that are not of the same material, weight, or geometry as the aftermarket version.

|

2/9/2020 9:04 PM

I'd say a custom bike is one with an aftermarket frame and mostly aftermarket parts. The frame is what I'd say makes the biggest difference between a custom and a complete bike.

|

2/10/2020 3:18 AM

unless you buy an aftermarket frame, then its not custom. thats why i just call bikes, stock, or aftermarket, even if its not total stock. i dont use the word custom.

|

2/10/2020 5:56 AM

I'll say it... nothing off the shelf should be considered custom. Other than for the Pro who designed/it was custom built for then mass marketed.

basically, get yourself a custom made to your preference frame then build it with parts you like, then you can call a custom BMX bike.

Custom is just a buzz word

|

2/10/2020 6:49 AM

In the same vein of a complete being a complete, what about a complete that comes with the same parts that you could buy aftermarket?

like the Begin sig (I think had his frame and his bars)

|

Straight Simpin'

2/10/2020 9:36 AM

Black Swamp Ghost wrote:

Just thinking out loud here...

Can a complete bike ever be called a custom, and if so, when?

Is a custom aftermarket frame with all parts from a complete, custom?

Just curious as to how everyone uses the term "custom"

My complete (Kink Williams) came with mostly aftermarket level parts, and there's not many customs I'd wanna trade it for bike for bike..

I see bikes on Craigslist that look like complete rigs with some different grips and pedals and to they call em custom...

A custom is a unique bike built from the ground up. For a bike to be a custom it must have a few criteria:
1. It must be built from scratch
2. Aftermarket parts
3. Build cannot match marketed bikes

|

Gave up on BMX to hang out with 13 year old soundcloud rappers, what a life, such a cool guy!
-Sheldon on Adam22

"The only future for BMX"

Yeah, kids getting shit bikes, breaking them and then quitting. LOL
-jbales on mafiaBIKES

I’ve been a 14 year old beginner for the last ten years
-adamnmexican

2/10/2020 9:37 AM

Black Swamp Ghost wrote:

Just thinking out loud here...

Can a complete bike ever be called a custom, and if so, when?

Is a custom aftermarket frame with all parts from a complete, custom?

Just curious as to how everyone uses the term "custom"

My complete (Kink Williams) came with mostly aftermarket level parts, and there's not many customs I'd wanna trade it for bike for bike..

I see bikes on Craigslist that look like complete rigs with some different grips and pedals and to they call em custom...

A custom is a unique bike built from the ground up. For a bike to be a custom it must have a few criteria:
1. It must be built from scratch
2. Aftermarket parts
3. Build cannot match marketed bikes

|

Gave up on BMX to hang out with 13 year old soundcloud rappers, what a life, such a cool guy!
-Sheldon on Adam22

"The only future for BMX"

Yeah, kids getting shit bikes, breaking them and then quitting. LOL
-jbales on mafiaBIKES

I’ve been a 14 year old beginner for the last ten years
-adamnmexican

2/10/2020 11:27 AM

Can a complete bike ever be called a custom, and if so, when?
If the complete comes with "aftermarket parts" and all other non-aftermarket parts have been replaced with "aftermarket parts", I'd say yes.

Is a custom aftermarket frame with all parts from a complete, custom?
Id say no... It's just an aftermarket frame with parts from a complete. Maybe just a "build"?

Generally, a "Custom" is a bike that's been built up with individually picked aftermarket parts (old, or used aftermarket parts still count).

The "anomaly" is a bike like the Sunday Soundwave Special. It's built to the same standards as a Custom, but it's still technically a complete. Ironically, if you purchased all of the parts individually and built the same bike it would be a Custom.

Double irony would be a "Custom" that's been built and sold by a bike shop... It's purchased as a "complete", but it's still technically a "Custom"... lol
|

2/10/2020 5:14 PM

I always viewed it as a build not custom, I’d only call it custom if I had s&m or laird made me frame fork bars to be true custom bike. But that’s just me

|

2/10/2020 6:29 PM

i say its a custom if its like 80% aftermarket parts (and the 20% can't be parts that matter. who gives a shit about a stock headset or like, grips)

drives me up the fucking wall when in facebook groups people are like "its custom" and it's what some of you have already described; a complete with swapped out grips and tires and like, MAYBE an aftermarket stem

similar pet peeve; when something is listed for sale and they just say like "fit frame". you ask them what frame and they say "fit" not the model name or anything just "fit"

|

2/10/2020 8:23 PM


|

2/11/2020 3:59 AM

BlinkerFluid wrote:

Maybe it's cause it is before 6 am and I am at work, or that I am running on like 4 hours sleep in the last 36 hours...but Laird welds the Mongoose teams' frames...so this becomes WAY funnier as a result.

|

"Hey anybody ever make that mistake like right when you wake up in the morning and you believe in yourself?" -Kyle Kinane

"BIKES!" -Tom Segura

2/11/2020 4:00 AM

bikect wrote:

I always viewed it as a build not custom, I’d only call it custom if I had s&m or laird made me frame fork bars to be true custom bike. But that’s just me

like readybmxer said, I think the term "custom" is just a shortened version of "custom build". So, a custom with "custom made parts" would be just that (a custom with custom made parts).

|

2/11/2020 8:47 AM
Edited Date/Time: 2/11/2020 9:03 AM

Just call it a bike , “Custom” “stock” the only kids I see at skateparks who worry about those terms are the ones who want to smack talk other riders for their bikes because their own riding can’t do the talking for them

|

2/11/2020 1:13 PM

I bought a Kink Whip XL and a 21.5" Backwoods frame to swap the parts over. I'd definitely call it a complete but I just wanted to ride so bad that I did it this way to be riding sooner. Every part that came on the "complete" will be replaced and then MAYBE I'd consider it "custom." Just my two cents.

|

2/11/2020 1:37 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/11/2020 1:38 PM

The WTP envy falls into the category of custom complete, I’m sure there are others too, but I guess I consider custom to be built not bought.

|

Ride everything

2/11/2020 7:20 PM

The term “aftermarket” gets used differently in BMX than it does in the motorcycle or car world. In BMX, it seems to mean a part is of a better quality, where in the motorcycle/car world, it means non-original equipment manufacturer. Harley-Davidson does not make aftermarket parts for their bikes. Vance & Hines, S&S, Drag Specialties et al, make aftermarket parts for Harley-Davidson. And aftermarket does not necessarily mean higher quality; if fact, it often is an inferior part.

In my opinion, Soundwaves and Envys and Williams’ are not customs, they’re completes, albeit nice completes. To me, a custom has to start with a bare frame, preferably one not available as a complete at minimum, and then assembled with components that work well together with that frame, both functionally and aesthetically. A complete, with upgraded parts, like I’m riding now, isn’t a custom in my book.

|

2/11/2020 9:46 PM
Edited Date/Time: 2/11/2020 9:47 PM

Furyus George wrote:

The term “aftermarket” gets used differently in BMX than it does in the motorcycle or car world. In BMX, it seems to mean a part is of a better quality, where in the motorcycle/car world, it means non-original equipment manufacturer. Harley-Davidson does not make aftermarket parts for their bikes. Vance & Hines, S&S, Drag Specialties et al, make aftermarket parts for Harley-Davidson. And aftermarket does not necessarily mean higher quality; if fact, it often is an inferior part.

In my opinion, Soundwaves and Envys and Williams’ are not customs, they’re completes, albeit nice completes. To me, a custom has to start with a bare frame, preferably one not available as a complete at minimum, and then assembled with components that work well together with that frame, both functionally and aesthetically. A complete, with upgraded parts, like I’m riding now, isn’t a custom in my book.

Yeah, funny how definitions get screwed up.

Saying Sunday's soundwave is built with all aftermarket parts or Kink's Williams is built with all aftermarket parts is an Oxymoron.

|

2/11/2020 9:54 PM

Damn, great comments from everyone.. I really can't argue with any of the above, all valid, and good points..

In the world I've been grown and raised, custom cars.. Custom means, it's cut and welded and built from scratch. Or, it's a factory built something, that's been cut shorter, made longer, or modified to the point that it's actually one of a kind. I would certainly consider a Laird frame ordered to your specs a custom frame. But in my world, buying a aftermarket frame and putting it together with aftermarket parts is literally still a build, if everything is bolt on/plug and play.

On the other hand..

The term "customized" means something different.. To me is simply anything that's been changed from original to suit the owner's taste or needs could be considered customized. Although none of the parts are actually "custom" made..

When I started this thread I had no idea so many of you guys would contribute with so many great comments.. Thanks for everyone chiming in..

|