Tires talk - sizes, psi, texture etc

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5/11/2020 10:09 PM

What $izes do you ride and why?
Is there a reason for having front bigger than back or opposite way?
Is the diffrent texture really makes a diffrent grip on the ground?
What tire do you think is good for anti flAta?
Since folding tires are so thin how come they are stronger and better?
I never really understood the psi meaning, i always ran 60 maximum butnice seen tirea with 120. Can someone really explain all this thing 😂
Just add/tell any experience you have about tires

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5/11/2020 10:18 PM

When I ride flatland I use 1.9 tires at 100psi. KHE MAC 1.5.

On my new skatepark bike I run 2.4s around 60ish psi but I may go down to 1.9-2.1 just because I’m used to tires that size. They are the stock Fit FAF tires.

It’s all personal preference. Experiment with different sizes and psi and find out what works for you.

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fack off

5/11/2020 11:09 PM
Edited Date/Time: 5/11/2020 11:10 PM

For park I run 1.95" at around 90 PSI, front and back.

To answer your questions:

- I run this size because, when pumped up to high ratings, it makes the bike feel very agile and quick. Compared to fatter tires, I (personally) feel they're too big and bulky and slow me down, especially since I don't grind or do drops.

- Bigger up front is preferred for a number of reasons. Sometimes functionality (wider width for traction in turning), sometimes aesthetics, sometimes brake clearance for some frames.

- Yes, texture/tread of a tire affects the grip. But also take into account the surface, i.e., a road, hard-packed dirt, or smooth concrete

- What the heck is flAta?

- Folding does not mean they're stronger, many can attest to how they're weaker, especially when the sidewalls rub ledges for those who grind. Most park riders run folding bead tires.

- PSI stands for pressure per square inch, the more you put in, the harder the tire because there's more pressure. The less PSI, the softer the tire. That's the Sparknotes version, I can't explain in great detail the science behind it. Generally, follow what the guidelines say for your PSI rating on the sidewall of your tire. You might be able to get away with more than rated, but it's your gamble.

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5/12/2020 2:14 AM

I ride eclat mirage 2.35” with Kevlar bead to shave some weight on the back end but I just bought a pair.
They weight around 550g instead of around 700g + for a BSD 2.4” (inflates to around 2.45”)

Btw folding tire do not necessarily mean thin tyre even if most are, it’s just they got Kevlar bead instead of steel.
My eclat mirage is a real tough street tyre, I grind alot, rolled over glass many many times, and worst of all for tyres of this kind, I do ghost feebles everywhere, even on the roughest sidewalks and the sidewall is just fine (obviously took some rubber off but that’s fine) and I got them since over a year... do that with a KHE park tyre and see what happens...

They fat but not the fattest, I don’t like 2.4’s +, 0.05 doesn’t seem much but it’s a thin 2.35” so feels more like a 2.3”
I like that size over bigger ones for one particular reason, the pivot point on g-turns is so slow to get in and feels sluggish with 2.4’s + but feels absolutely perfect on 2.30´s

Bigger tyre in the front is good, I used to ride 2.25”/2.4” combo, it relaxes the handing a little bit by making your headtube a little less steep (like from 75° to around 74.8° or so), and you can benefit impact absorption of the 2.4” for wrist comfort on gaps and save a little weight on the back.

About pressure, most tyres can take up to around 110psi, but it’s a maximum, if you ride 60 or 70 psi it’s fine, it’s a limit not an instruction, and they can even take more pressure without exploding.
Some cheaper tyres say 60psi max tho.

For the grip, many things matter, tyre size, thread and rubber.
The bigger the tyre the more contact area.
Each thread excels in something, but many tyres are just all around, some more slicker than others, if you take a trail tyre who looks like a dh tyre, I will be shitty on street or bowl or anything hard, same goes the other way you don’t ride trails with slick tyres (unless it’s super hard packed dirt and totally dry).

My go to tyre for a while was the BSD Donnasqueak which is the perfect definition of all around, then I tried the BSD donnastreet, and... they’re more street mostly because of the slick sidewall, which feels really nice to ghost feeble on compared to Donnasqueaks but the thread was also more.. inexistant, pretty much slick, which is okay on the back, but I didn’t liked it on the front to ride a bowl.

Also the color matters, bsd tyres comes in a shit tons of colors and it doesn’t change much when they are new but colored tyres do not age well, they become hard and super slippery after not using them for a while.

And this close this little tyre guide, you are now a man full of knowledge.

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5/12/2020 3:50 AM

I ride the WeThePeople stickin' in 2.3" rear and front and I'm also riding street with drops and grinds. I pump them up at about 5 bar/ 73psi front and back because I feel more responsibility at high psi and I don't like it when you're jumping a drop with 180 and you're tire folds. I ride them for 6 months and never had a flat, these tires are thick at the surface and sidewall never had an issue. These tires also are very grippy like the name is saying they're really stick to everything. But a main contra is the high weight it weights about 700g which is pretty much and I would like to switch to lighter tires but the WeThePeople stickin' are very good option if you ride street.

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5/12/2020 10:42 AM

Francky wrote:

I ride eclat mirage 2.35” with Kevlar bead to shave some weight on the back end but I just bought a pair.
They weight around 550g instead of around 700g + for a BSD 2.4” (inflates to around 2.45”)

Btw folding tire do not necessarily mean thin tyre even if most are, it’s just they got Kevlar bead instead of steel.
My eclat mirage is a real tough street tyre, I grind alot, rolled over glass many many times, and worst of all for tyres of this kind, I do ghost feebles everywhere, even on the roughest sidewalks and the sidewall is just fine (obviously took some rubber off but that’s fine) and I got them since over a year... do that with a KHE park tyre and see what happens...

They fat but not the fattest, I don’t like 2.4’s +, 0.05 doesn’t seem much but it’s a thin 2.35” so feels more like a 2.3”
I like that size over bigger ones for one particular reason, the pivot point on g-turns is so slow to get in and feels sluggish with 2.4’s + but feels absolutely perfect on 2.30´s

Bigger tyre in the front is good, I used to ride 2.25”/2.4” combo, it relaxes the handing a little bit by making your headtube a little less steep (like from 75° to around 74.8° or so), and you can benefit impact absorption of the 2.4” for wrist comfort on gaps and save a little weight on the back.

About pressure, most tyres can take up to around 110psi, but it’s a maximum, if you ride 60 or 70 psi it’s fine, it’s a limit not an instruction, and they can even take more pressure without exploding.
Some cheaper tyres say 60psi max tho.

For the grip, many things matter, tyre size, thread and rubber.
The bigger the tyre the more contact area.
Each thread excels in something, but many tyres are just all around, some more slicker than others, if you take a trail tyre who looks like a dh tyre, I will be shitty on street or bowl or anything hard, same goes the other way you don’t ride trails with slick tyres (unless it’s super hard packed dirt and totally dry).

My go to tyre for a while was the BSD Donnasqueak which is the perfect definition of all around, then I tried the BSD donnastreet, and... they’re more street mostly because of the slick sidewall, which feels really nice to ghost feeble on compared to Donnasqueaks but the thread was also more.. inexistant, pretty much slick, which is okay on the back, but I didn’t liked it on the front to ride a bowl.

Also the color matters, bsd tyres comes in a shit tons of colors and it doesn’t change much when they are new but colored tyres do not age well, they become hard and super slippery after not using them for a while.

And this close this little tyre guide, you are now a man full of knowledge.

I use a 2.25 kevlar bead mirage in the back because they hold up to feebles really well! smile

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5/12/2020 10:45 AM

Not a fan of anything over 2.1 tires They feel far too slow and sluggish for my liking , 1.95 where my favourite , 100 psi filled up Kevlar walls are my go too , Maxxis grifters are great , on some khe mark webb tires right now I like them , going to try tiogas or total killabees next I think

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5/12/2020 10:59 AM

readybmxer wrote:

For park I run 1.95" at around 90 PSI, front and back.

To answer your questions:

- I run this size because, when pumped up to high ratings, it makes the bike feel very agile and quick. Compared to fatter tires, I (personally) feel they're too big and bulky and slow me down, especially since I don't grind or do drops.

- Bigger up front is preferred for a number of reasons. Sometimes functionality (wider width for traction in turning), sometimes aesthetics, sometimes brake clearance for some frames.

- Yes, texture/tread of a tire affects the grip. But also take into account the surface, i.e., a road, hard-packed dirt, or smooth concrete

- What the heck is flAta?

- Folding does not mean they're stronger, many can attest to how they're weaker, especially when the sidewalls rub ledges for those who grind. Most park riders run folding bead tires.

- PSI stands for pressure per square inch, the more you put in, the harder the tire because there's more pressure. The less PSI, the softer the tire. That's the Sparknotes version, I can't explain in great detail the science behind it. Generally, follow what the guidelines say for your PSI rating on the sidewall of your tire. You might be able to get away with more than rated, but it's your gamble.

The science behind it has to do with how much gas molecules are in a given volume. Think of a room with 90 equally sized, equally spaced people, then think of the same room with 180 equally sized, equally spaced people, it would be twice as crowded and harder to move around in, making it more packed and "harder" to get through.
Also, good 100 psi tires can go up to 120 without any issues arising. Honestly, bmx tires are WAAAAAY more durable than people believe, it's just that BMX causes a lot of wear on tires. Honestly a good tire and rim combo can take like 200 psi riding on a flat surface and nothing else. OlaBMX actually did a video on this a while back.

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-adamnmexican

5/13/2020 10:59 AM
Edited Date/Time: 5/13/2020 11:01 AM

I had a thread recently that would cover some of your questions but I can't find it right now. LOL.

I'll just give you my little experience. My bike came with 2.4's but when I put a micrometer to them they were actually 248 in the rear and 2.46 on the front. Pretty frickin wide. The max pressure was 65 also. I kind of liked how cushy they felt but I didn't like they way they looked. They looked like cartoon tires to me and it's partly cuz eastern puts HUGE lettering on their tires. But the size too was just.... They are heavy too. Also, my front tire had very little and I mean very little clearance to the fork. It never rubbed but my fork is a bit cockeyed and I have to put a washer on one side of the hub to get it to be straight.

Anyways.... after asking questions a lot of guys around here said they like smaller tires better. So I decided to try smaller. I bought some 2.1 Kenda Admirals from a local shop and they are rated at 100 psi. both front and rear. I don't think my style of riding needs a bigger tire in the front.

For me nearly every trick feels better the bike feels better and it definitely lost some weight. Now, the only time I feel like I miss the big tires is when doing bunny hops. But even then... it's not that big of a deal. Landings were definitely softer but if I only put 65 psi into my current tires it would probably feel similar. When I pump mine up they are at 82-83 ish right now because it's about as much as my air compresser will muster. It's old and small. And it feels just about right to me anyways.. I'm not sure Id want it all the way to 100. Although I might like it if I did. LOL. But I do think I miss a bit of spring in a lower PSI tire ONLY when doing hops. Everything else feels better with the smaller tires. But I'm mostly doing stuff on flat ground. So..... I can see why pros that get big air and such might want a fatter tire for landings.

Foldable tires have Kevlar in them that makes them stronger than a normal tire. At least that's how I understand it. So they can be lighter and I think thinner yet stronger. That being said, thinner tires may still wear quicker if you're grinding a lot, even if they are stronger. At least so I hear... I think. Or maybe it's just thinner normal tires.... IDK... someone else can confirm or deny that.

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Philippians 1:6 And I am sure of this, that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Christ Jesus. Insta: SilentNightSun

5/13/2020 12:45 PM

I run the smallest tires out of anyone at my park. they are all on this stupid 2.4 is life trend. Well we have one guy thats riding the total 2.3 and 2.1 combo.. so its not that bad. still bigger than i like

I run the Maxxis Grifter folding 2.1 in the front and the 1.85 in the rear.

ideally id like to run the KHE mac 2 and the 1.5 but i cant find them anywhere.

i also run 100PSI. for me it helps make the bike nice and twitchy and just feel lighter. i can spin faster. flairs are super easy with higher psi. its just all around better for my type of riding.

im strictly park. i dont ride dirt and you wont see me bar to ice down a big street rail.

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5/13/2020 1:32 PM

When Mishinn mic'd his maxxis Grifter 2.1 for me I think he said they were like 2.2" actual. My 2.1" Kenda's are actually a hair under 2.0" actually LOL. At first that irritated me but now I like it. I think those tires are pretty good. They got good grip too. And seem to be holding up nice. But the main place that gets any actions is pretty much right down the center patch no grinding on them from me.

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Philippians 1:6 And I am sure of this, that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Christ Jesus. Insta: SilentNightSun

5/13/2020 1:39 PM

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Philippians 1:6 And I am sure of this, that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Christ Jesus. Insta: SilentNightSun

5/13/2020 3:04 PM

HavokDJ wrote:

The science behind it has to do with how much gas molecules are in a given volume. Think of a room with 90 equally sized, equally spaced people, then think of the same room with 180 equally sized, equally spaced people, it would be twice as crowded and harder to move around in, making it more packed and "harder" to get through.
Also, good 100 psi tires can go up to 120 without any issues arising. Honestly, bmx tires are WAAAAAY more durable than people believe, it's just that BMX causes a lot of wear on tires. Honestly a good tire and rim combo can take like 200 psi riding on a flat surface and nothing else. OlaBMX actually did a video on this a while back.

The only issue of over pumped tyres is to actually ride them, sure the tyre will be able to handle 150 psi and cruise flat ground, but what about jumping a stairset or a gap to wall... when we see how much a tyre deform itself for a split second before going back to it’s nice round shape.
Well for that split second, an area of the tyre is flat so the psi rise everywhere else, and if the tyre is already over pumped to 150 and rise to 180 it might just be too much for the tyre to handle.

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5/13/2020 5:32 PM

I ride a 2.3 front in rear it used to be 2.0 rear and 2.3 front reason for the change was I do alot of shoefanu variations and the 2.3 grips my shoe better due to the surface area. The big downside Is alot of grinds feel worse with wider tires due to more drag on the rail or ledge.

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