Titanium...

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10/13/2017 2:03 AM

I'm dabbling with the idea of going with a titanium frame and even bars. I mostly ride dirt with some park in the mix. What are the thoughts on titanium here?

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Smoke Drink Die

10/13/2017 2:37 AM

Personally, it's a crap material for bmx parts. The only benefit you'll get is it'll be lighter. But how light do you really need your bike?
It's more expensive, and weaker than good chromoly. Just buy an fbm and it'll last you a lifetime

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10/13/2017 4:39 AM

I like titanium & I think it has it's uses where it's properties shine BUT, I'm not sure it lends itself to BMX (at least not Street & Trail riding) as much as I would like. Like Steve said, it's light. but it's EXPENSIVE! And (at least in other bicycle applications that I have had contact with) it's "flexy". & by flexy, I mean the frame is less stiff when forces are applied (pedal, etc...). In the end it is up to you, so if you have an extra couple thousand dollars burning a hole in your pocket...

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10/13/2017 4:42 AM

Titanium is not very flexible, it's brittle. it would only be suitable for dirt jumping. Chromoly is good all around. Titanium is hella expensive too. It's around two thousand for the frame.

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Ride for yourself and have fun

10/13/2017 5:16 AM

Anthony Loves Subrosa wrote:

Titanium is not very flexible, it's brittle. it would only be suitable for dirt jumping. Chromoly is good all around. Titanium is hella expensive too. It's around two thousand for the frame.

It all depends on how it's applied. Ever ridden a titanium MTB? The frame is generally very flexy.

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10/13/2017 5:31 AM

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Ride for yourself and have fun

10/13/2017 5:36 AM
Edited Date/Time: 10/13/2017 5:39 AM

Have you ever ridden a ti framed MTB (or road) bike? I'm telling you, they are flexy. There's no such thing as a material that doesn't flex. "flexing" and "bending" are completely different. An actual "BEND" is completely different. Likewise, there are aluminum alloys that can be bent & others that cannot.

So... perhaps you should rethink your "professional opinion" when you have other experience with materials other than what you read in a BMX forum.

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10/13/2017 5:42 AM

Mishinn_Control wrote:

Have you ever ridden a ti framed MTB (or road) bike? I'm telling you, they are flexy. There's no such thing as a material that doesn't flex. "flexing" and "bending" are completely different. An actual "BEND" is completely different. Likewise, there are aluminum alloys that can be bent & others that cannot.

So... perhaps you should rethink your "professional opinion" when you have other experience with materials other than what you read in a BMX forum.

Dave Lawrence in that forum went to school for it. I think he knows what he's talking about. And yes there are materials if made with tight and rigid molecular bonds, can be very brittle and barely flex.

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Ride for yourself and have fun

10/13/2017 5:50 AM
Edited Date/Time: 10/13/2017 5:52 AM

Anthony Loves Subrosa wrote:

https://www.vitalbmx.com/forums/General-BMX-Talk,2/titanium-vs-chromoly,53098


Read up

Mishinn_Control wrote:

Have you ever ridden a ti framed MTB (or road) bike? I'm telling you, they are flexy. There's no such thing as a material that doesn't flex. "flexing" and "bending" are completely different. An actual "BEND" is completely different. Likewise, there are aluminum alloys that can be bent & others that cannot.

So... perhaps you should rethink your "professional opinion" when you have other experience with materials other than what you read in a BMX forum.

Anthony Loves Subrosa wrote:

Dave Lawrence in that forum went to school for it. I think he knows what he's talking about. And yes there are materials if made with tight and rigid molecular bonds, can be very brittle and barely flex.

Listen... you are an idiot. I'm a machinist/welder by trade (look it up). I have many metallurgy (look it up) classes. It's (part of) what I do. The Titanium we are talking about it an Alloy (look it up).

Here... let me help you out kid.

http://bicycletimesmag.com/everything-you-wanted-to-know-about-titanium/
(second paragraph... since you don't want to believe me).


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10/13/2017 6:02 AM

Spending like $3000 on Titanium frame and bars isn't really worth it... I don't know much about metals or alloys and stuff like that but I do know that spending $3000 on something that isn't really better than the industry standard (Heat Treaded Chromoly) is just not worth it to make your bike a few pounds lighter... also to be honest I don't even like light bikes becasue they feel weak and unstable plus I'd rather have my bike heavier and stronger than lighter and weaker....

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I don't crash, I do random gravity checks...

10/13/2017 6:12 AM
Edited Date/Time: 10/13/2017 6:17 AM

Mishinn_Control wrote:

Listen... you are an idiot. I'm a machinist/welder by trade (look it up). I have many metallurgy (look it up) classes. It's (part of) what I do. The Titanium we are talking about it an Alloy (look it up).

Here... let me help you out kid.

http://bicycletimesmag.com/everything-you-wanted-to-know-about-titanium/
(second paragraph... since you don't want to believe me).


Alright then. Don't call me an idiot for having little knowledge in the specific property's of the titanium alloy.

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Ride for yourself and have fun

10/13/2017 6:28 AM
Edited Date/Time: 10/13/2017 6:35 AM

Anthony Loves Subrosa wrote:

Alright then. Don't call me an idiot for having little knowledge in the specific property's of the titanium alloy.

Then don't call out someone else on the properties of materials you don't have ANY experience with. You quoted a forum post from a guy as your proof & said "read up". You can't assume that the post you read was completely accurate. Nor can you you assume anything you read on the internet. ALWAYS seek out multiple sources before forming an opinion. I'm not saying anything about Dave's expertise. He had some training a while ago. It's doesn't make him an expert. Nor would I say I am an "expert" either. But I'm competent enough to confidently state my opinion on the subject from my actual experiences with the material in and out of bicycle frames (I spent 4 years in the US Air Force working with Titanium in that environment).

So to sum up, research, don't call people out without having the facts, grow a thick skin, & everything is good.

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10/13/2017 6:59 AM

Mishinn_Control wrote:

Then don't call out someone else on the properties of materials you don't have ANY experience with. You quoted a forum post from a guy as your proof & said "read up". You can't assume that the post you read was completely accurate. Nor can you you assume anything you read on the internet. ALWAYS seek out multiple sources before forming an opinion. I'm not saying anything about Dave's expertise. He had some training a while ago. It's doesn't make him an expert. Nor would I say I am an "expert" either. But I'm competent enough to confidently state my opinion on the subject from my actual experiences with the material in and out of bicycle frames (I spent 4 years in the US Air Force working with Titanium in that environment).

So to sum up, research, don't call people out without having the facts, grow a thick skin, & everything is good.

I did do my research before posting. i viewed multiple sources and i came to the conclusion that titanium was brittle. But i also saw people saying it was flexy. but most people said it was brittle so i believed it was brittle. I don't spit shit out of my mouth with no knowledge of the subject.

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Ride for yourself and have fun

10/13/2017 7:18 AM

Anthony Loves Subrosa wrote:

I did do my research before posting. i viewed multiple sources and i came to the conclusion that titanium was brittle. But i also saw people saying it was flexy. but most people said it was brittle so i believed it was brittle. I don't spit shit out of my mouth with no knowledge of the subject.

In this particular case, you don't seem to be correct.

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10/13/2017 7:58 AM

I have titanium in my shoukder and i've broken it twice. I wouldn't trust a bike made out of the stuff.

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10/13/2017 8:21 AM

Mishinn_Control wrote:

In this particular case, you don't seem to be correct.

Seems so...

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Ride for yourself and have fun

10/13/2017 11:26 AM

blaaaaaaaaa wrote:

I have titanium in my shoukder and i've broken it twice. I wouldn't trust a bike made out of the stuff.

Haha, that's awesome. But it sucks too.

I've been a bicycle mechanic for over 15 years. In that time I've seen 4 ti frames. 3 of them were broken (2 xc mtb's that cracked, and a road bike with a flared headtube).

A ti frame is less rigid than alloy, so it's a more comfortable ride. And has less power transfer. But it cracks a lot quicker than chromoly.

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10/13/2017 12:39 PM

grumpySteve wrote:

Personally, it's a crap material for bmx parts. The only benefit you'll get is it'll be lighter. But how light do you really need your bike?
It's more expensive, and weaker than good chromoly. Just buy an fbm and it'll last you a lifetime

Well I mean if he has the money and he wants to spend it and he fully understands the costs and benfits of Ti, why not right?

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10/13/2017 12:51 PM

grumpySteve wrote:

Personally, it's a crap material for bmx parts. The only benefit you'll get is it'll be lighter. But how light do you really need your bike?
It's more expensive, and weaker than good chromoly. Just buy an fbm and it'll last you a lifetime

Or a T1 anything...

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10/13/2017 2:38 PM

Id be interested in things like titanium pedals, sprockets, seat clamps, ubrakes arms, cable hangers, brake levers and such. Basically replace all the aluminum items with titanium.

Not sure about a stem, hub shells, or rims but Id be interested if there were some out there, though.

Ive heard that titanium frames are uncomfortably light and flexy for tricks but provide a smooth ride for just cruising and such. Im sure the flex and lightweight could something you could get used to but it sounds very off-putting imo.

I have little to no titanium experience and have never even seen a titanium frame in person but based on the price and "flexiness" alone I will most likely never purchase a titanium frame or titanium parts since aluminum and chromoly is so much more affordable and strong and light enough for my purposes.

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10/13/2017 2:52 PM

Bulletpup wrote:

Id be interested in things like titanium pedals, sprockets, seat clamps, ubrakes arms, cable hangers, brake levers and such. Basically replace all the aluminum items with titanium.

Not sure about a stem, hub shells, or rims but Id be interested if there were some out there, though.

Ive heard that titanium frames are uncomfortably light and flexy for tricks but provide a smooth ride for just cruising and such. Im sure the flex and lightweight could something you could get used to but it sounds very off-putting imo.

I have little to no titanium experience and have never even seen a titanium frame in person but based on the price and "flexiness" alone I will most likely never purchase a titanium frame or titanium parts since aluminum and chromoly is so much more affordable and strong and light enough for my purposes.

I'd be interested in titanium items to help lighten a bike but wouldn't trust it for the risking we (attempt to) do. Things like bolts, maybe pegs, etc... Could shave out weight without breaking the bank.

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10/13/2017 2:57 PM

Bulletpup wrote:

Id be interested in things like titanium pedals, sprockets, seat clamps, ubrakes arms, cable hangers, brake levers and such. Basically replace all the aluminum items with titanium.

Not sure about a stem, hub shells, or rims but Id be interested if there were some out there, though.

Ive heard that titanium frames are uncomfortably light and flexy for tricks but provide a smooth ride for just cruising and such. Im sure the flex and lightweight could something you could get used to but it sounds very off-putting imo.

I have little to no titanium experience and have never even seen a titanium frame in person but based on the price and "flexiness" alone I will most likely never purchase a titanium frame or titanium parts since aluminum and chromoly is so much more affordable and strong and light enough for my purposes.

Mishinn_Control wrote:

I'd be interested in titanium items to help lighten a bike but wouldn't trust it for the risking we (attempt to) do. Things like bolts, maybe pegs, etc... Could shave out weight without breaking the bank.

Titanium bolts strip easily from what Ive heard...could very well be people not using correct size tools or people using worn tools, as well.

That being said, the most vocal people are usually the ones that have had a bad experience...so theres that.

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10/13/2017 2:59 PM
Edited Date/Time: 10/13/2017 3:00 PM

Bulletpup wrote:

Id be interested in things like titanium pedals, sprockets, seat clamps, ubrakes arms, cable hangers, brake levers and such. Basically replace all the aluminum items with titanium.

Not sure about a stem, hub shells, or rims but Id be interested if there were some out there, though.

Ive heard that titanium frames are uncomfortably light and flexy for tricks but provide a smooth ride for just cruising and such. Im sure the flex and lightweight could something you could get used to but it sounds very off-putting imo.

I have little to no titanium experience and have never even seen a titanium frame in person but based on the price and "flexiness" alone I will most likely never purchase a titanium frame or titanium parts since aluminum and chromoly is so much more affordable and strong and light enough for my purposes.

Mishinn_Control wrote:

I'd be interested in titanium items to help lighten a bike but wouldn't trust it for the risking we (attempt to) do. Things like bolts, maybe pegs, etc... Could shave out weight without breaking the bank.

I wonder what a bike entirely made of titanium would weigh? Like literally every part down to bb spindle, axles , etc.

Be cool to ride, id be scared to scratch a $100,000,000 dollar bike though. lol

Probably realistically cost as much as a nice car to build.

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10/13/2017 3:35 PM
Edited Date/Time: 10/13/2017 3:42 PM

Mishinn_Control wrote:

Listen... you are an idiot. I'm a machinist/welder by trade (look it up). I have many metallurgy (look it up) classes. It's (part of) what I do. The Titanium we are talking about it an Alloy (look it up).

Here... let me help you out kid.

http://bicycletimesmag.com/everything-you-wanted-to-know-about-titanium/
(second paragraph... since you don't want to believe me).


MTB and road bikes are larger, with different types of forces applied, which would be a legitimate explanation as to why you would be able to feel the flex more there. On a BMX bike with a much smaller frame in all aspects, and with less leverage from the side to side forces of general riding, you would be very unlikely to notice a huge difference in flex from Chromoly unless it was poorly designed. Honestly I would venture to say comparing a road or MTB frame to a BMX bike is apples to oranges because of how different they are, and their applications being so different. Personal experience on a chromoly MTB, and a chromoly CX bike showed me that I can pedal and SEE the frame flex side to side when would really crank hard (The CX was a single speed, MTB is a geared setup). I cannot see that on a BMX.

Now if you have ridden chromoly MTB and or road bikes and Ti MTB and or Road bikes in roughly the same specs and same terrains, that would give a much better comparison on the materials and how they differ within the same type of application. I only base that on similar scenarios being applied to both materials. It wasn't mentioned, but if you rode on different terrains etc, you can only base it on general properties of the materials, which would not equate to a valid "testing scenario".

To the OP, you absolutely can look into Ti parts, and they are pretty awesome, BUT the price is what keeps a LOT of people away. 2K for a Ti Lairdframe. Granted you design all aspects, BUT that is a lot for a BMX frame to shave about 1.5 lbs. Personally I would ONLY ride trails or smooth park with no pegs if I ran one of those, just because of the pricetag. Mike Laird has ridden them, and he is a burly rider so you know they can handle a lot. Eastern brought back the Ti Grim Reaper with a slightly lower price tag, but there is no customization.

Comparatively, you can get FOUR chromoly Lairdframes for the same amount of money (actually a bit less), or upwards of SIX other frames.

But it is your pocketbook. Have at it and report back!

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"Hey anybody ever make that mistake like right when you wake up in the morning and you believe in yourself?" -Kyle Kinane

"BIKES!" -Tom Segura

10/13/2017 11:58 PM

Must be somewhat durable, Ricky shreds his parts.

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Scooter kid trying to ride a bike. Instagram: @scootereyn // YouTube: RH MEDIA

10/14/2017 6:01 AM

I think I'll test it out with the Eastern bars first just to see how much I notice this flexing. I wasn't planning on doing another Laird frame but the titanium has me very curious. I tell myself that MTB and road bikes cost more so I can justify it for our sport haha.

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Smoke Drink Die

10/14/2017 8:22 AM

Colonydirt94 wrote:

I think I'll test it out with the Eastern bars first just to see how much I notice this flexing. I wasn't planning on doing another Laird frame but the titanium has me very curious. I tell myself that MTB and road bikes cost more so I can justify it for our sport haha.

I doubt you'll notice it. I'm not even sure how much you'd notice it with a BMX bike since the geo is so small. I'm sure it's more flexible than chromo but it may not be noticeable, OR it may be really nice (softer feeling on landings, etc...). Either way, let us know what you think. I've never seen a ti bmx bike, let alone ridden one. I'd like to know your thoughts if you ever get one compared to my experience with mtb to bikes.

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10/14/2017 8:42 AM
Edited Date/Time: 10/14/2017 6:54 PM

A guy I know rode Clint Reynolds old titanium bike he said the frame flexed allot, I love me some titanium though , just ordered a profile elite with 14 mm titanium gdh axle and a 9 tooth ti driver , ran the same deal in my old profile minis for years with pegs and they held up great, might eventually get a to laird frame down the road

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10/15/2017 12:24 AM

I had a ti driver, lasted 18 months.

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10/15/2017 2:00 AM

Today's chromoly parts have been worked to near perfection, and what I mean is, why pay a lot more for a titanium part just to lose a bit of weight?
Maybe a ti frame or handlebars have a considerable difference of weight next to chromoly ones, but on any other BMX part, you'll pay a ton of cash to shed a few ounces. Not to mention what people have said here before, that ti frames and bars (or cranks even) flex a lot.
Not worth it for me.
If say, good chromoly cranks are between 150 to 180 bucks, instead of spending $300 on ti cranks (or more? I don't even know how much these cost), try to buy the very best CrMo cranks for something like 200 maybe? Do a little research, and if you have the 300 to spend on some ti cranks, go with the very best chromoly cranks ever and keep some cash left in your pocket.

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