What would you say are the most important components to be chromoly?

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9/14/2017 8:12 PM

There is hi-ten steel, chromoly, but is there anything else bmx bikes are made of?

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9/14/2017 8:17 PM

Race bikes are made out of aluminum and carbon fiber but for freestyle that's pretty much it. Chromoly is actually a type of hi-ten steel, so hi-ten steel is a pretty vague description. There are lots of different types. Nobody ever says what they use though.

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9/14/2017 9:24 PM

For freestyle bikes:
Frame
Bars
Forks
Cranks (at least the spindle. Even though Im not on that team, I wont argue against the 7075 alu crankarm guys)
Hub axles and Pedal spindles.

Optional:
Doesnt really matter that much if your pegs, hubguards, or sprocket are chromoly or not.

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9/14/2017 9:25 PM

Theres also titanium frames and forks but those cost an arm and a leg and are generally overkill.

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9/14/2017 10:05 PM

Frames , forks , bars . In that order .

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9/15/2017 2:35 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/15/2017 2:35 AM

There is ox platinum tubing that standard uses , and Reynolds tubing I hear both of those have a better strength to weight ratio then chromoly

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9/15/2017 6:12 AM

eskimojay wrote:

There is ox platinum tubing that standard uses , and Reynolds tubing I hear both of those have a better strength to weight ratio then chromoly

They're both types of chromoly. Standard don't use ox platinum anymore as it's made by true temper, who no longer make bike tubes. Reynolds have a vast amount of different tubes, depending on what it's going to be used for. The tubes (generally) that have a better strength to weight are usually a fair bit lighter, but not as strong. UK (reynolds) and American tubes are drawn cold, so they're stronger than Taiwanese. Sanko is a Japanese steel that is stronger than Taiwanese chromoly, it's real good, but got a bad name for itself when frames started snapping. But, they only snapped because manufacturers used a thinner gauge (with the thought that if it's stronger, you can use less material and save weight).
S&m, laird, and fbm now use veriwall thermlx tubes. Fbm also use reynolds and Colombus (italian) tubes.

Frame, forks, bars, cranks, crank axles, hub axles, and pedal axles, and drivers should be chromoly (alloy female hub axles are good enough if you don't use pegs). Ti is a lot lighter, but weaker. I would put ti anything anywhere near my bike. It also wears quicker than chromoly.

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9/15/2017 6:27 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/15/2017 6:29 AM

Eastern make titanium bars as well. Lifetime warranty.

Anyway, i would say heat treating is a necessity if you go hard in the paint. Even chromoly bends pretty easily if its not properly heat treated.

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9/15/2017 6:49 AM

Titanium is also a LOT more "flexy" than Chromoly. Any part that is welded, really should be "Nornalized" then heat treated to whatever harness is desired by the manufacturer. I highly doubt this is happening tho. Even on high end frames.

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9/15/2017 7:01 AM

If a frame is welded well, post weld normalising makes no real difference, some chromoly also claims to air harden post weld. Any part with harsher bends should be normalised though. Normalising is the only heat treatment process bmx companies play with as there's a high risk of twisting and buckling if it's not done right

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9/15/2017 7:09 AM

grumpySteve wrote:

If a frame is welded well, post weld normalising makes no real difference, some chromoly also claims to air harden post weld. Any part with harsher bends should be normalised though. Normalising is the only heat treatment process bmx companies play with as there's a high risk of twisting and buckling if it's not done right

True but for optimum strength & if you want the best possible scenario, nomalizing would be preferred. Is it need, in 95% of application, probably not.

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9/15/2017 8:04 AM

grumpySteve wrote:

If a frame is welded well, post weld normalising makes no real difference, some chromoly also claims to air harden post weld. Any part with harsher bends should be normalised though. Normalising is the only heat treatment process bmx companies play with as there's a high risk of twisting and buckling if it's not done right

Mishinn_Control wrote:

True but for optimum strength & if you want the best possible scenario, nomalizing would be preferred. Is it need, in 95% of application, probably not.

Yeah, but it's not a simple process on a frame. There are post weld heat treated frames on the market, and they still crack. Good quality materials and a good weld is better than poor materials, a poor weld and heat treatment. Plus the cost of heat treating will put the cost of the frames up. And if it goes wrong the manufacturer has a bunch of twisted frames they can't do anything with

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9/15/2017 8:11 AM

grumpySteve wrote:

If a frame is welded well, post weld normalising makes no real difference, some chromoly also claims to air harden post weld. Any part with harsher bends should be normalised though. Normalising is the only heat treatment process bmx companies play with as there's a high risk of twisting and buckling if it's not done right

Mishinn_Control wrote:

True but for optimum strength & if you want the best possible scenario, nomalizing would be preferred. Is it need, in 95% of application, probably not.

grumpySteve wrote:

Yeah, but it's not a simple process on a frame. There are post weld heat treated frames on the market, and they still crack. Good quality materials and a good weld is better than poor materials, a poor weld and heat treatment. Plus the cost of heat treating will put the cost of the frames up. And if it goes wrong the manufacturer has a bunch of twisted frames they can't do anything with

Oh, I'm not arguing the facts of the difficulty & expense involved & how that would be passed on to the consumer. Just stating ... "in a perfect world....."

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