Wheels

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10/11/2020 9:03 AM

Hello Vital Forums,

Do any members have any experience on complete wheels? There seem like plenty of options, even some sold in sets. I myself have ridden a couple of custom wheels. They were heavy is what I remember.

Anyone pick some up lately?

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10/11/2020 9:13 AM

It always seem my custom wheels are built better than factory wheels and need less maintenance

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45 refs and counting check profile.

10/11/2020 9:34 AM

I build my own wheels. No way I’m letting a machine or some guy that can’t line the hub logo up with the valve hole build my wheels.

But yeah, custom built will be pre stressed during the building process (if the builder knows what they’re doing). Whereas pre built are usually machine built and not pre stressed, hence the spokes making noise and coming loose easier. Machine built are fine and not built badly, they just require that little bit more maintenance when new and bedding in

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10/11/2020 9:42 AM

Just bought 2 new wheels...demolition rotator v4 and shadow symbol front wheel

No issues so far other than plastic hub guards cracking, everything else seems fine to me

I dont know anyone who builds wheels and I'm not about to build wheels so complete wheels it is

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10/11/2020 9:57 AM

i see. i feel like a truing stand is necessary. i've been laughed at before for not truing my wheels. i didn't know any better at the time.

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10/11/2020 10:20 AM

ghostrider920 wrote:

i see. i feel like a truing stand is necessary. i've been laughed at before for not truing my wheels. i didn't know any better at the time.

A truing stand is usually a bit of a luxury for bmxers, most people do it by eye and make sure they’re true enough to not rub anything.
I use my thumb nail to judge true. Just slam my wheel so I know it’s sitting straight, then hold the chainstay with my thumb sticking out toward the rim, if it touches the nail, it needs to be pulled the other way.

Just bear in mind there certainly is such a thing as being too tight

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10/11/2020 12:28 PM

im riding a proper magnalite complete cassette on the back, and no problems there, i have a stranger wheel on the front that i laced myself and no problems there either. unless you ride super hard i dont think theres much differences apart from maybe having to re tighten the spokes on complete wheels after riding them for a bit.

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10/11/2020 1:02 PM

ghostrider920 wrote:

i see. i feel like a truing stand is necessary. i've been laughed at before for not truing my wheels. i didn't know any better at the time.

.pegless. wrote:

A truing stand is usually a bit of a luxury for bmxers, most people do it by eye and make sure they’re true enough to not rub anything.
I use my thumb nail to judge true. Just slam my wheel so I know it’s sitting straight, then hold the chainstay with my thumb sticking out toward the rim, if it touches the nail, it needs to be pulled the other way.

Just bear in mind there certainly is such a thing as being too tight

i really think a truing stand is best. you can do it on your desk!

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10/11/2020 7:35 PM

ghostrider920 wrote:

i see. i feel like a truing stand is necessary. i've been laughed at before for not truing my wheels. i didn't know any better at the time.

.pegless. wrote:

A truing stand is usually a bit of a luxury for bmxers, most people do it by eye and make sure they’re true enough to not rub anything.
I use my thumb nail to judge true. Just slam my wheel so I know it’s sitting straight, then hold the chainstay with my thumb sticking out toward the rim, if it touches the nail, it needs to be pulled the other way.

Just bear in mind there certainly is such a thing as being too tight

ghostrider920 wrote:

i really think a truing stand is best. you can do it on your desk!

Yeah definitely, I was only mentioning it because most bmxers don’t bother

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10/11/2020 8:03 PM

Yup, I’ve always trued my wheels on the bike. I use the brake pads on the back or a wire tie on the fork.

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10/12/2020 12:39 AM

As soon as I learned to build my own wheels, I decided that I’ll likely never buy a complete wheel again. Just tonight, I’ve started two new wheel builds, it’s very satisfying to do and you have the option to pick everything yourself.

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Scooter kid trying to ride BMX.
Instagram: @scootereyn

10/12/2020 4:18 AM

I’ve had complete eclat wheels that were sick. Rode them for a long time, no issues with the build. Built up my next set, they loosened up more at first and required a couple more rounds of truing and tensioning when I broke them in than the eclats did. Bought shadow wheels like two months ago and no joke, haven’t trued or tensioned them once and they’re great. Don’t ask me how, I’ve never had wheels that don’t require a break in and some adjusting before. I like custom cause I can pick all the specifics of the build, but I also like complete cause it’s so much faster. Not like I wouldn’t want a shadow hub and shadow rim in a custom build, why not buy it already done and save an hour and a half of my day

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10/12/2020 5:42 AM

thanks for your feedback guys!

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10/12/2020 5:53 AM

iv'e seen on YouTube a video of wheel building in DTswiss factory, looks like there isn't more professional than this
high tec machines with people that do it so much
but as it comes to bmx I'm not sure about anything, most of the bmx industry manufacturing is located in east country's
and not much information is there about anything.

so you can't really know whos taking handle of your wheel the only thing u can know is that the hub, rims and spokes
will probably match nicely since they are the same company, you'll have the right size spokes, design hub guards will match it all, all the components are aftermarket so its totally fine and a lot of pros use custom wheels for their built

i will always recommend learning how to lace and true a hub. building wheel is an art but you can defiantly learn it and maintenance your wheel and have the maximum out of it which is super important.
bmx wheel get loose quickly as a street rider and it has a lot of impact about your feel when riding, confidence and its just a must to know everything about wheel building and maintenance it.

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10/12/2020 7:40 AM

i feel like building a wheel is a lot of learning/research/work.

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10/12/2020 8:44 AM

ghostrider920 wrote:

i feel like building a wheel is a lot of learning/research/work.

It's not a big deal with so much information being online these days. I assembled my first 3 cross wheel in short order following along with a how to video. Took me as long to true it as it did to assemble, possibly due to enjoying a few too many adult beverages before and during the process. I've done a couple since and they go together easy enough. With all the write ups, videos, and spoke calculators available, there's really not a lot of guess work to worry over.

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10/12/2020 8:56 AM

ghostrider920 wrote:

i feel like building a wheel is a lot of learning/research/work.

It’s just a pattern, learn how to do it properly and it becomes easy. I worked as a bike mechanic for over 15 years, so I’ve built hundreds. But once you know the pattern, and the order to do everything, it’s really enjoyable. I’d say it’s my favourite bike related thing other than actually riding

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10/12/2020 9:11 AM

ghostrider920 wrote:

i feel like building a wheel is a lot of learning/research/work.

.pegless. wrote:

It’s just a pattern, learn how to do it properly and it becomes easy. I worked as a bike mechanic for over 15 years, so I’ve built hundreds. But once you know the pattern, and the order to do everything, it’s really enjoyable. I’d say it’s my favourite bike related thing other than actually riding

well what happens if you mess it up?

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10/12/2020 9:25 AM

ghostrider920 wrote:

well what happens if you mess it up?

Simply take the spokes & nipples off and start again. Like they said, once you learn the pattern, almost every single wheel build will be the same. It’s easy to see mistakes in wheel building as well, so learning to correct them comes easily, I find.

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Scooter kid trying to ride BMX.
Instagram: @scootereyn

10/12/2020 9:35 AM

ghostrider920 wrote:

i feel like building a wheel is a lot of learning/research/work.

.pegless. wrote:

It’s just a pattern, learn how to do it properly and it becomes easy. I worked as a bike mechanic for over 15 years, so I’ve built hundreds. But once you know the pattern, and the order to do everything, it’s really enjoyable. I’d say it’s my favourite bike related thing other than actually riding

ghostrider920 wrote:

well what happens if you mess it up?

thing is you don't have to build one to ride it. find a wheel that is not in use and "play" with it and learn on it.
messing up is part of the game so don't be afraid of it. be afraid of messing it up and not knowing you did haha but you'll be fine.
as one who did this research and process of learning lately i will suggest you:
it can take few days i agree but not more than this and you'll know so much it will only improve you and make you such a badass.

i remember just looking at my wheel before I knew anything about building a wheel and i was like "omg this is Chinese for me wtf is going on there"
now i look at a wheel and i can see immediately everything i need to know about it, i can recognize the pattern immediately and notice if its built good, if something is missing

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10/12/2020 10:02 AM

ive tried before... i really got confused. i took it to a shop and they helped me... but it was just an eastern hub. it was heavy and my 180s would drop.

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10/12/2020 1:55 PM

Quick question since I see y'all talking about it. Do y'all take your tires of when you true your wheels or just leave it on?

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10/12/2020 2:09 PM

WiteMic wrote:

Quick question since I see y'all talking about it. Do y'all take your tires of when you true your wheels or just leave it on?

If I'm not building a wheel from scratch I usually just true it when its in the frame with the tire on.

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10/12/2020 3:39 PM

ghostrider920 wrote:

i feel like building a wheel is a lot of learning/research/work.

.pegless. wrote:

It’s just a pattern, learn how to do it properly and it becomes easy. I worked as a bike mechanic for over 15 years, so I’ve built hundreds. But once you know the pattern, and the order to do everything, it’s really enjoyable. I’d say it’s my favourite bike related thing other than actually riding

ghostrider920 wrote:

well what happens if you mess it up?

Take your time and check the pattern regularly. Double check every spoke is in the right place before even putting the nipple on if you’re really not confident. But if you follow the pattern, you can’t go wrong

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10/12/2020 4:23 PM

WiteMic wrote:

Quick question since I see y'all talking about it. Do y'all take your tires of when you true your wheels or just leave it on?

I take them off but i wouldn't do that for every one of my friends and sometimes laziness drops on even when i true my own wheels.
but it doesn't have an effect on it as much as i know..
park tool has a new truing stand that is so huge for tyre clearness since today you have all those electric bikes with motorcycle tyres.

but yeah defiantly best is to take the tire off, look at the rim maybe you'll find a crack or something that needs to be found.. i like to put a drop of oil on the nipples
and even take care of the hops of the rims (radial trueness) since you can't really do that when having a tyre on.

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