When did you stop buying completes?

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8/14/2018 6:30 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/14/2018 6:32 AM

After getting back to riding I've bought some small upgrades to my old 2010 Verde Vex. However, I'm slowly creeping towards the point where I will either have to start replacing some of the more expensive/important parts or look up a new complete. I know the new complete would also need the upgrades at some point, but I'm wondering if a higher quality complete would make for a better "base".

So, what was your solution to this age old dilemma? When did you decide you're just going to build a custom, whether it was all at once or piece by piece over the years? Or did it happen by accident? Are you still riding completes with just minor upgrades? Please share your wisdom.

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8/14/2018 6:40 AM

Just buy a new frame and swap everything over and continue to upgrade.

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8/14/2018 6:56 AM

dead goon wrote:

Just buy a new frame and swap everything over and continue to upgrade.

^^^ THIS ^^^

I think that;'s pretty much the progression. I mean, you guy a decent complete. Your frame takes a beating, you buy a new frame, transfer the parts, ride it until something breaks/starts to fail, replace it.

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8/14/2018 6:59 AM

Ive never bought a complete, my first proper BMX was a used custom off craigslist... but every single part was changed (except the front hub and the Par Ends lol) and its now my custom...

So yeah...

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I don't crash, I do random gravity checks...

8/14/2018 7:10 AM

From swapping everything from my L100 to my Subrosa frame, the only thing left to replace are the cranks and wheels.

Then I can throw all that back on the Mongoose and have another full bike. smile

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8/14/2018 7:19 AM

I had a second hand diamondback viper in 94, it was trash so my dad bought me a new gt performer in 95. Then I bought a federal complete when I got back into riding in 04ish? Other than that I've always had aftermarket stuff, either new or second hand. Even when I was skint, if I needed a new part, I'd buy second hand. You can build a really good bike this way. Around here I can easily get a used custom build for £200, so buying a new complete always seemed like a waste of money. I've spent a lot on my bike, but I'm still using some used parts

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8/14/2018 7:25 AM

Hmmm I see your point(s). I might have to take a look at some frames and whatever I'd have to change along with it. For once in my life I could actually afford buying some ok quality parts, maybe I'm just scared of swapping parts other than bars or tires etc since I've never done it.laughing

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8/14/2018 7:26 AM

It's super easy, man. Plus, Youtube...

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8/14/2018 7:32 AM

Your bike has a mid bb and integrated headset, pretty much any part by any brand will be a simple straight swap. Just remember crank axle size. And your bike is pretty old, so replace your sprocket at the same time as chain and back wheel. If any of your drivetrain is worn, new stuff will wear quicker and probably sound horrible

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8/14/2018 7:32 AM

dead goon wrote:

It's super easy, man. Plus, Youtube...

Nah I know I can physically do it, it's more about the mental side. Buying a complete is so easy, getting parts is always more work and things to consider. Plus I can only blame myself if something doesn't fit lol

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8/14/2018 7:36 AM

grumpySteve wrote:

Your bike has a mid bb and integrated headset, pretty much any part by any brand will be a simple straight swap. Just remember crank axle size. And your bike is pretty old, so replace your sprocket at the same time as chain and back wheel. If any of your drivetrain is worn, new stuff will wear quicker and probably sound horrible

Oh yeah so it seems, that's quite nice actually. I'm starting to feel it'll be a better option to customize.

Thanks for the opinions btw, it's all really helpful

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8/14/2018 8:34 AM

After the first one.
I'll probably buy another one when in 30 and want to start riding again since everyone seems to quit in their mid 20s and start riding again once they are a bit older.

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Hmmm

8/14/2018 9:23 AM

Edman123 wrote:

After the first one.
I'll probably buy another one when in 30 and want to start riding again since everyone seems to quit in their mid 20s and start riding again once they are a bit older.

Lol I guess I was early, stopped riding a bit under 20 and returned now at 25grin

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8/14/2018 9:16 PM

I've only had 1 complete. Before it I was building bikes out of trash (literal broken bikes people would throw it. #dumpsterdiving). It was my 2002 Haro Mirra 540 Air. I had it until 08. By 2003 it was all after market parts except maybe the stem. In 08, I bought a second hand Fit ED and life changed.

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8/15/2018 3:04 AM

I’ve also only had one complete. A 2002 Hoffman Prodigy 900. Folded the 1 piece crank in the first week. After about 2 years, only the stem and the seat clamp were left.

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8/15/2018 5:18 AM
Edited Date/Time: 8/15/2018 10:24 AM

The last complete I ever had, new (prior to the Eastern when I returned to BMX in full) was a Torker Maxflight (1982?). I had a Mongoose Decade pro I bought used after that around 1989 & I acquired a Hoffman SD4 used. But I don't consider that as a complete since it was more of a this is a cool mid/old school bike I'd like to have for kicks (but not really to ride)

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8/15/2018 9:57 AM

Thanks for the input guys, I've come to the conclusion I might as well get myself some quality parts and not buy another complete. Which brings me to my newbie questions.

As grumpySteve pointed out earlier, my current bike has a mid BB and an integrated headset so swapping parts shouldn't be too much of a hassle. I've been thinking of getting a new frame since the old one is a bit beat up already. Obviously I'm buying a frame that is mid BB and integrated headset compatible, but during my research I couldn't find much about whether I can count on my current parts fitting to the new frame. Are the dimensions for example a mid BB or an integrated headset "standardized" in any way or can I end up with a frame that should work with my current parts on paper but in reality it doesn't?

I can handle working with washers and spacers etc. but too large bearings for a hole too small or something like that could be a problemgrin

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8/15/2018 10:07 AM

Rabbe wrote:

Thanks for the input guys, I've come to the conclusion I might as well get myself some quality parts and not buy another complete. Which brings me to my newbie questions.

As grumpySteve pointed out earlier, my current bike has a mid BB and an integrated headset so swapping parts shouldn't be too much of a hassle. I've been thinking of getting a new frame since the old one is a bit beat up already. Obviously I'm buying a frame that is mid BB and integrated headset compatible, but during my research I couldn't find much about whether I can count on my current parts fitting to the new frame. Are the dimensions for example a mid BB or an integrated headset "standardized" in any way or can I end up with a frame that should work with my current parts on paper but in reality it doesn't?

I can handle working with washers and spacers etc. but too large bearings for a hole too small or something like that could be a problemgrin

Yes Mid BBs are standard outside diameter, inside diameter depends on spindle size (19mm, 22mm, 24mm). So your current BB will fit in any new frame made for a mid BB. If you're using the same cranks and BB on a new frame, you won't have any issues.

Headsets are the same way. I believe most integrated headsets now are 45º/45º (I believe this refers to the angle of the race) so they'll pop right in as well.

The only issue you may find in setting up a new frame with the headset/stem stuff is headset spacers, but those are a quick fix.

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BMX over 30: Eat clean, Stretch, and Pray.

8/15/2018 10:15 AM

TheDarkEnergist wrote:

Yes Mid BBs are standard outside diameter, inside diameter depends on spindle size (19mm, 22mm, 24mm). So your current BB will fit in any new frame made for a mid BB. If you're using the same cranks and BB on a new frame, you won't have any issues.

Headsets are the same way. I believe most integrated headsets now are 45º/45º (I believe this refers to the angle of the race) so they'll pop right in as well.

The only issue you may find in setting up a new frame with the headset/stem stuff is headset spacers, but those are a quick fix.

That's nice to hear. And yeah I'm fine with playing with spacers, shouldn't be a big problem. I was pretty sure the outside diameters should be standard but better safe than sorry.

Thank you for the confirmation sir.

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8/15/2018 10:20 AM

Rabbe wrote:

That's nice to hear. And yeah I'm fine with playing with spacers, shouldn't be a big problem. I was pretty sure the outside diameters should be standard but better safe than sorry.

Thank you for the confirmation sir.

Anytime dude! And my path has been VERY similar to yours. Bought a complete in 2011, rode until things started breaking, replaced replaced replaced, got a new frame and swapped everything over without an issue. Good luck with the search!

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BMX over 30: Eat clean, Stretch, and Pray.

8/15/2018 10:29 AM

Rabbe wrote:

Thanks for the input guys, I've come to the conclusion I might as well get myself some quality parts and not buy another complete. Which brings me to my newbie questions.

As grumpySteve pointed out earlier, my current bike has a mid BB and an integrated headset so swapping parts shouldn't be too much of a hassle. I've been thinking of getting a new frame since the old one is a bit beat up already. Obviously I'm buying a frame that is mid BB and integrated headset compatible, but during my research I couldn't find much about whether I can count on my current parts fitting to the new frame. Are the dimensions for example a mid BB or an integrated headset "standardized" in any way or can I end up with a frame that should work with my current parts on paper but in reality it doesn't?

I can handle working with washers and spacers etc. but too large bearings for a hole too small or something like that could be a problemgrin

TheDarkEnergist wrote:

Yes Mid BBs are standard outside diameter, inside diameter depends on spindle size (19mm, 22mm, 24mm). So your current BB will fit in any new frame made for a mid BB. If you're using the same cranks and BB on a new frame, you won't have any issues.

Headsets are the same way. I believe most integrated headsets now are 45º/45º (I believe this refers to the angle of the race) so they'll pop right in as well.

The only issue you may find in setting up a new frame with the headset/stem stuff is headset spacers, but those are a quick fix.

Rabbe wrote:

That's nice to hear. And yeah I'm fine with playing with spacers, shouldn't be a big problem. I was pretty sure the outside diameters should be standard but better safe than sorry.

Thank you for the confirmation sir.

Keep in mind, some frames may have a longer head tube than other (i.e. The S&M Tallboy) that are designed to run (for the most part, without spacers between the headset and stem. SO.... suppose you bought a Tallboy frame with the idea of transferring everything over. & lets say on your old setup, you had cut your fork steerer tube down to that you didn't have to run any spacers. Well, your fork steerer may now be too short to extend beyond the top of the HT enough for proper installation.

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8/15/2018 10:53 AM

Mishinn_Control wrote:

Keep in mind, some frames may have a longer head tube than other (i.e. The S&M Tallboy) that are designed to run (for the most part, without spacers between the headset and stem. SO.... suppose you bought a Tallboy frame with the idea of transferring everything over. & lets say on your old setup, you had cut your fork steerer tube down to that you didn't have to run any spacers. Well, your fork steerer may now be too short to extend beyond the top of the HT enough for proper installation.

I see, I'll keep that in mind. I'm pretty sure my fork has some extra on the steerer tube atm but I'll do my research before buying. And to be honest, I'll have to get a new fork at some point so if it comes to that I'll just get one a bit earlier than planned.

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