Why do cheap bikes come with massive sprockets

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9/5/2018 8:00 PM

I’d assume that since they’re bigger, they’d cost more to produce compared to 25t sprockets of similar materials and build quality

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smile

9/5/2018 8:05 PM

Cheap mass produced sprockets. Plus freewheels are easier to mass produce than cassettes

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9/6/2018 12:50 AM
Edited Date/Time: 9/6/2018 12:51 AM

It’s mostly because cheap freewheels for cheap hubs can only go down to I think 14t, maybe 13? So if they used a 25t sprocket, you’d be doing dank wheelies everywhere and won’t get any speed.

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9/6/2018 1:45 AM

jbales wrote:

It’s mostly because cheap freewheels for cheap hubs can only go down to I think 14t, maybe 13? So if they used a 25t sprocket, ...more

Commonly you can only get as small as 16t freewheels. There's plenty of manufacturers of those. 13t are really rare now and will only come on a mid range mongoose or something similar. Plus, really cheap bikes use pressed steel sprockets, so they're dirt cheap to make. They're not really bmx's, they're more like bmx style kids bikes

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9/6/2018 5:56 AM

jbales wrote:

It’s mostly because cheap freewheels for cheap hubs can only go down to I think 14t, maybe 13? So if they used a 25t sprocket, ...more

grumpySteve wrote:

Commonly you can only get as small as 16t freewheels. There's plenty of manufacturers of those. 13t are really rare now and ...more

^^^ THIS ^^^

It isn't so much about the amount of material as much as ease of production. Those sprockets aren't even machined (which is where the actual expense comes from in the manufacturing process).

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9/6/2018 8:18 AM

I always thought it was for a better gearing ratio for casual cruising. Didn’t even think of the stamped steel and freewheels. Makes a lot of sense though. Maybe it’s a combo meal.

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9/6/2018 9:22 AM

Because they're pressed out of actual Dinner plates.

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