YouTube BMX?

Related:
Create New Tag

6/29/2020 7:21 AM

Thinks have changed since I last rode, and all of a sudden there are all these great smaller BMX brands, but now they sponsor youtubers? I get it, they're creators, and it might be worth it to them to give some of these influencers a sponsorship, but are these guys as good as the guys on X Games and Dew Tours and stuff like that? And don't get me wrong, these guys are good, way better than I'll ever be, but it reminds me of the And1 guys back in the early 2000's, where yes, they were great at moves, but no where near NBA good. Is this the same, like is Billy Perry on the same level as a Kevin Peraza? Just wondering if that's the new BMX scene, are X-Games still a thing?

|

"We suffer more in imagination than in reality" - Seneca

6/29/2020 7:49 AM

Times are changing man. I still don't understand why Austin Augie gets a signature Fit frame but its all about marketing these days.

|

Bit of a slut for Fit & Primo.

6/29/2020 8:08 AM

Brimson wrote:

Times are changing man. I still don't understand why Austin Augie gets a signature Fit frame but its all about marketing these days.

And I get it, but yea, I think if youre going to have someone be an ambassador for your brand, they might be someone at the top of their game. Like you don't see the 12th man on an NBA roster with a signature shoe. And also, I don't see any of these vloggers winning any competitions, maybe competitions don't matter anymore? Well, I'm 35 and just starting out(I'm a big kid), maybe I'll start a channel and get views because people like old people falling, and maybe I'll get my signature frame haha.

|

"We suffer more in imagination than in reality" - Seneca

6/29/2020 8:14 AM

Brimson wrote:

Times are changing man. I still don't understand why Austin Augie gets a signature Fit frame but its all about marketing these days.

StillAKilla85 wrote:

And I get it, but yea, I think if youre going to have someone be an ambassador for your brand, they might be someone at the top of their game. Like you don't see the 12th man on an NBA roster with a signature shoe. And also, I don't see any of these vloggers winning any competitions, maybe competitions don't matter anymore? Well, I'm 35 and just starting out(I'm a big kid), maybe I'll start a channel and get views because people like old people falling, and maybe I'll get my signature frame haha.

Competitions only matter in the sense to prove that your brand exists, it doesn't really matter who wins. All that people care about nowdays is what Instagram clips/ edits riders make. Just the way I see it

|

6/29/2020 2:00 PM

I agree with all of this. People like Austin Auggie and Brandon Begin are better entrepreneurs than bike riders (they do well in establishing themselves as a brand/lifestyle and subsequently sell well). I think Billy Perry does a good job of still pushing himself, although he is no where near as good as some of the best street riders.

At the end of the day, having a successful YouTube channel is difficult so I am not expecting the best in the business having time to run a successful channel as well. However, there so many better AMs that are more deserving of Auggie/Begin's pro spots if you look at the situation purely from a skill point.

However, at the end of the day pro bike riders are paid for brand visibility not skill.

|

6/29/2020 3:27 PM

It makes sense. Kids these days aren't reading tips in BMX Plus on how to do the tricks they can't get down, they're going to youtube. Obviously a rider who's good at riding as well as explaining how to nail tricks is enticing to sponsor. It's a good way to target newer riders and establish your brand in their heads early on. Plus if the product is good enough for this dude who taught them the tricks then it's good enough for them.

|

6/30/2020 12:19 AM

These days with ad revenue and YouTube mean that making a living can be done via YouTube videos. Plus, it's another platform for creators to branch out to things like merchandise and other social media accounts.

Also, anybody can do it. All you really need is a phone and internet.

|

Scooter kid trying to ride BMX.
Instagram: @scootereyn

6/30/2020 5:42 AM

Slick1 wrote:

It makes sense. Kids these days aren't reading tips in BMX Plus on how to do the tricks they can't get down, they're going to youtube. Obviously a rider who's good at riding as well as explaining how to nail tricks is enticing to sponsor. It's a good way to target newer riders and establish your brand in their heads early on. Plus if the product is good enough for this dude who taught them the tricks then it's good enough for them.

I get that, and I guess it's a sport anyone can do, I get the sponsor part of it, yes, if you ride brand x and kids watch you, they'll probably buy brand x, but signature frames? I guess when you're a smaller company this is what you have to do to get your name out there. Times have changed for sure. Also, not hating on these guys, just getting used to the new way of how things are done, don't you a holes "ok boomer" me, I'm 35 not 65 haha

|

"We suffer more in imagination than in reality" - Seneca

6/30/2020 5:55 AM

guess it's just modern times, even me being young i still agree that bmx in the early 2000s and 1990s was absolutely insane the the level of send and tricks was a lot more crazy than today. of course people do still kill it but the people who are on similar levels of riding to people 20 years ago are very small and are a lot of people sponsored are definitely not the best riders, but i guess thats just how it works with social media and bmx being more than just riding nowadays.

|

6/30/2020 1:30 PM
Edited Date/Time: 6/30/2020 1:33 PM

Id rather watch someone worse at bmx with a better personality than someone better with a lack of personality.

Some of the best riders, of course, are awesome people outside of bmx but if they aren't on youtube showing off their personality, how would anyone know?

Its like the equivalent of not being in a magazine back when magazines were super popular, you could be killing it but if no one has ever seen you in a video part or read an article about you in a magazine...you dont exist.

This is an extreme exaggeration of course but I guarantee more people know Scotty Cranmers name over say Brandon Loupos.

|

6/30/2020 2:09 PM

Bulletpup wrote:

Id rather watch someone worse at bmx with a better personality than someone better with a lack of personality.

Some of the best riders, of course, are awesome people outside of bmx but if they aren't on youtube showing off their personality, how would anyone know?

Its like the equivalent of not being in a magazine back when magazines were super popular, you could be killing it but if no one has ever seen you in a video part or read an article about you in a magazine...you dont exist.

This is an extreme exaggeration of course but I guarantee more people know Scotty Cranmers name over say Brandon Loupos.

i actually do agree with the personality thing. some peoples personality and the way they act with friends and stuff can really get me pumped to ride if i watch a bmx youtube video, even if the riding isn't top notch.

|

7/1/2020 5:18 AM

People also like progression. Scotty's videos show a ton of it. The best part is many of the tricks they show are first time pulled etc-as in they are sketchy landings, some crashes etc, but they are all clearly having a good time. It's real riding. Video parts with bangers from start to finish are not a good expectation of real riding. That's also why when getting parks to allow bikes, you ensure that the city council etc understands that the Xgames is not a valid representation of your average rider-and most non-riders do not get that.

You don't see INSANE stuff 100% of the sessions. Garrett for example, yea, he is super good, but I bet a lot of his sessions are pretty tame compared to his video parts. I know when I have filmed, I have fired out more crazy stuff VS when I am just cruising.

|

"Hey anybody ever make that mistake like right when you wake up in the morning and you believe in yourself?" -Kyle Kinane

"BIKES!" -Tom Segura

7/1/2020 7:58 AM

Is this kinda like Revive and Braille in the skate scene. YouTubers making themselves pro coz they got themselves a little company. Yes some of them dudes are pretty good, (Jonny Giger) but I can't see them getting sponsored from big time brands (Girl, Element, etc....).

|

7/2/2020 6:21 AM

YouTubers are a great way for companies to get exposure from someone that matches their brand identity. They may not all be "core" riders but their ability to reach the brand's target audience is pretty hard to match. It's also a good way for them to inspire kids to start riding/ buying their products.
That being said, there are A LOT of douche bag YouTube riders out there too so 🤷‍♂️

|

7/2/2020 7:37 AM

ABorland9 wrote:

YouTubers are a great way for companies to get exposure from someone that matches their brand identity. They may not all be "core" riders but their ability to reach the brand's target audience is pretty hard to match. It's also a good way for them to inspire kids to start riding/ buying their products.
That being said, there are A LOT of douche bag YouTube riders out there too so 🤷‍♂️

I see that, companies just want exposure, and the way the world works now, they don't care about personality as much as clicks. I mean some of them are pretty good, Crammer actually used to be pretty damn good, but he's the only one of the youtube crew that has done anything. But hey, if I can learn a thing or two from youtube, I'll take it, just the concept is new to me, like really, signature frames to someone who has never proven himself/herself against the very best? I'm a competitor, so I don't care if I had 5 billion views a day, I'd want to know how good I am by going up against the best, even if I get my ass handed to me.

|

"We suffer more in imagination than in reality" - Seneca

7/2/2020 2:28 PM

ABorland9 wrote:

YouTubers are a great way for companies to get exposure from someone that matches their brand identity. They may not all be "core" riders but their ability to reach the brand's target audience is pretty hard to match. It's also a good way for them to inspire kids to start riding/ buying their products.
That being said, there are A LOT of douche bag YouTube riders out there too so 🤷‍♂️

StillAKilla85 wrote:

I see that, companies just want exposure, and the way the world works now, they don't care about personality as much as clicks. I mean some of them are pretty good, Crammer actually used to be pretty damn good, but he's the only one of the youtube crew that has done anything. But hey, if I can learn a thing or two from youtube, I'll take it, just the concept is new to me, like really, signature frames to someone who has never proven himself/herself against the very best? I'm a competitor, so I don't care if I had 5 billion views a day, I'd want to know how good I am by going up against the best, even if I get my ass handed to me.

I love the clean, fun and positive message Scotty Cranmer videos provide. I've watched his channel for a few years now and I admit he's the main reason I'm interested in BMX again. The dude is a trooper and his crew is awesome too.

Don't get me wrong. I'm not a prude. Nice change of pace.

|

7/2/2020 2:30 PM

ABorland9 wrote:

YouTubers are a great way for companies to get exposure from someone that matches their brand identity. They may not all be "core" riders but their ability to reach the brand's target audience is pretty hard to match. It's also a good way for them to inspire kids to start riding/ buying their products.
That being said, there are A LOT of douche bag YouTube riders out there too so 🤷‍♂️

StillAKilla85 wrote:

I see that, companies just want exposure, and the way the world works now, they don't care about personality as much as clicks. I mean some of them are pretty good, Crammer actually used to be pretty damn good, but he's the only one of the youtube crew that has done anything. But hey, if I can learn a thing or two from youtube, I'll take it, just the concept is new to me, like really, signature frames to someone who has never proven himself/herself against the very best? I'm a competitor, so I don't care if I had 5 billion views a day, I'd want to know how good I am by going up against the best, even if I get my ass handed to me.

shupe13 wrote:

I love the clean, fun and positive message Scotty Cranmer videos provide. I've watched his channel for a few years now and I admit he's the main reason I'm interested in BMX again. The dude is a trooper and his crew is awesome too.

Don't get me wrong. I'm not a prude. Nice change of pace.

I love Scotty's videos as well. It's a lot of the other guys that aren't so great.

|

7/2/2020 3:24 PM

StillAKilla85 wrote:

I see that, companies just want exposure, and the way the world works now, they don't care about personality as much as clicks. I mean some of them are pretty good, Crammer actually used to be pretty damn good, but he's the only one of the youtube crew that has done anything. But hey, if I can learn a thing or two from youtube, I'll take it, just the concept is new to me, like really, signature frames to someone who has never proven himself/herself against the very best? I'm a competitor, so I don't care if I had 5 billion views a day, I'd want to know how good I am by going up against the best, even if I get my ass handed to me.

shupe13 wrote:

I love the clean, fun and positive message Scotty Cranmer videos provide. I've watched his channel for a few years now and I admit he's the main reason I'm interested in BMX again. The dude is a trooper and his crew is awesome too.

Don't get me wrong. I'm not a prude. Nice change of pace.

ABorland9 wrote:

I love Scotty's videos as well. It's a lot of the other guys that aren't so great.

Yeah some of those cats don't set a good example for the future torch barers.

|

7/3/2020 12:14 AM

Let’s just call it what they are: Influencers. The pretty decent or hilariously crazy BMX rider with 2 million Instagram followers is going to be perceived as having more clout than a Dew Tour 5th place finisher with 40k followers.

|

7/3/2020 8:51 AM

This is a topic that can go super deep and sooo many different directions.
At the end of the day, a BMX company is a business and companies need to make money to survive.
A rider is essentially a billboard for a company and the money/resources they put into a rider are essentially the same thing as an advertising budget. A lot of people hate looking at BMX this way, and I get it. But its the truth.

When you compare the reality of things its pretty understandable why a company would choose a youtuber over someone else.
To gain a youtube following takes an insane amount of either luck or work. Most of the time, its years of work before anything actually happens. There's also no denying that once a channel is successful, it takes a massive amount of work to keep it successful and usually successful youtubers also have a business sense as a youtube channel is essentially a small business.
When you weigh things out, a person with a massive following on the internet, who also has a work ethic, is usually pretty decent at riding bikes, that might have some kind of business sense makes a lot of sense for a company to pick up.

This is all without even mentioning the fact that every single kid and all their friends spend most of their time on the internet and youtube. Who are companies trying to advertise to? Kids.
Contests just don't mean as much as they used to for advertising when someone like Scotty Cranmer who used to win contests can post a video 5 days a week and consistently reach 100,000 to 150,000 people on every single one with anywhere from 5 million to 10 million total views per month. That's a lot more valuable these days than a contest which maybe 50,000 people will watch the highlights from.

All of this being said, I do have a somewhat successful youtube channel and I don't have a bike sponsor.

Consider this...Three of the smartest business men in the entire history of BMX help out youtubers. Chris Moeller helps out Austin Augie. Robbie Morales helps out Brandon Begin and Anthony Panza. Ronnie Bonner helps out a few the Scotty Cranmer crew

|

7/3/2020 10:11 AM
Edited Date/Time: 7/3/2020 10:15 AM

As much as I understand the business aspect of it, I personally won't buy the signature from of someone who is more of a YouTube star than a bike rider. You won't catch me dead with any FTL gear or on the Panza signature colorway Too Short. Although I think both of these brands/colorways are sick, I'd rather have a Ty Morrow frame, a Enarson frame, or a Kerley frame. I think when it comes to spending MY MONEY on bike stuff I prefer to support the core dudes.

I know what is "core" is subjective and is an opinion and I fully respect anyone who does prefer to watch Panza or Austin Augie and wants to spend their money to support what they do. I personally would chose to watch more stuff like the latest "Homestead" or "Always Fiending" edits than any vlog. I feel that putting my feeble amount of money spent in bike parts towards those types of dudes is more "core" and in a distant way, shows that I appreciate the immense work they put into these types of projects.

It is kind of like the DVD vs. web edit argument in a way. Web edits were the cheap/easy way out many thought, but the visibility was so much greater so brands and fans pushed it. Now with vlogs and YouTube videos made in an afternoon, the web edits I listed above are coveted project pieces in comparison.

|

7/3/2020 10:30 AM

Ridingismylifex1 wrote:

This is a topic that can go super deep and sooo many different directions.
At the end of the day, a BMX company is a business and companies need to make money to survive.
A rider is essentially a billboard for a company and the money/resources they put into a rider are essentially the same thing as an advertising budget. A lot of people hate looking at BMX this way, and I get it. But its the truth.

When you compare the reality of things its pretty understandable why a company would choose a youtuber over someone else.
To gain a youtube following takes an insane amount of either luck or work. Most of the time, its years of work before anything actually happens. There's also no denying that once a channel is successful, it takes a massive amount of work to keep it successful and usually successful youtubers also have a business sense as a youtube channel is essentially a small business.
When you weigh things out, a person with a massive following on the internet, who also has a work ethic, is usually pretty decent at riding bikes, that might have some kind of business sense makes a lot of sense for a company to pick up.

This is all without even mentioning the fact that every single kid and all their friends spend most of their time on the internet and youtube. Who are companies trying to advertise to? Kids.
Contests just don't mean as much as they used to for advertising when someone like Scotty Cranmer who used to win contests can post a video 5 days a week and consistently reach 100,000 to 150,000 people on every single one with anywhere from 5 million to 10 million total views per month. That's a lot more valuable these days than a contest which maybe 50,000 people will watch the highlights from.

All of this being said, I do have a somewhat successful youtube channel and I don't have a bike sponsor.

Consider this...Three of the smartest business men in the entire history of BMX help out youtubers. Chris Moeller helps out Austin Augie. Robbie Morales helps out Brandon Begin and Anthony Panza. Ronnie Bonner helps out a few the Scotty Cranmer crew

I get all of this, and it's the smart thing to do since that's how business gets done now, but before I'd buy a signature frame/bike, they'd have better done more than have a billion views, now that doesn't mean I'll stay way from their brand(which is the point I guess). Also, I'm not saying any of this is bad, not hating on them. I just always thought you kinda needed to be a badass in order to get signature anything. I mean if anyone saw the Last Dance, Pippen walked into the Hall of Fame and he only got like 3 signature shoes from Nike, we're talking one of the top 50 players of all time. At the end of the day, business changes and these companies are smart and this is they way to get your name out there, specially right now, with life canceled.

|

"We suffer more in imagination than in reality" - Seneca

7/3/2020 10:30 AM

Your opinion/respect for the other side of your opinion and the fact that all sides exist are all a perfect representation of the Freestyle nature of things in life/bmx.
It all exists and can exist because so many people have differing opinions and support different things.
Which I think is pretty bad ass and I love when people see both sides regardless of which they support.

I don't even think there is an argument to be had, honestly. It all exists and is all awesome and we all get to support what we want to because BMX is freestyle and its fuckin sick. haha

|

7/3/2020 10:37 AM

Ridingismylifex1 wrote:

Your opinion/respect for the other side of your opinion and the fact that all sides exist are all a perfect representation of the Freestyle nature of things in life/bmx.
It all exists and can exist because so many people have differing opinions and support different things.
Which I think is pretty bad ass and I love when people see both sides regardless of which they support.

I don't even think there is an argument to be had, honestly. It all exists and is all awesome and we all get to support what we want to because BMX is freestyle and its fuckin sick. haha

Definitely no argument, just needed an explanation, which I go, It makes sense, and like I said, I could never hate on anyone that is good at what they do, they've put in the time and effort, specially in a sport like BMX, where athleticism itself can only get you so far, you might be able to run a sub 4.5/40, but that don't help on a bike haha, so it takes balls and practice. And trust me, as someone who is starting again from the bottom(thanks covid!), I know I can learn a thing or two from these guys. And I used to think that hitting a baseball was the hardest thing to do in sports, but I rather face off against someone throwing 100mph than try any of these front flips haha.

|

"We suffer more in imagination than in reality" - Seneca

7/9/2020 6:06 PM

The off thing about it is that it feels double branded. A guy builds his own then gets sponsored. Bill Perry is more known as himself and FTL but then also rides for Volume. Panza more known as just Panza than as a Cult rider but the trip vids they put him in helps. Companies use to just discover a guy then grow their names together, which still happens. Can't compare video part guys to contest guys though that was always separated.

|