DIY 'Dropout spacers' / chain tensioners/etc?

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9/12/2015 9:02 PM

I've been having trouble keeping my rear axle as tight in the dropouts as I'd like. While I'm approaching this from several angles already, I would like to try out a tensioner, but none of my local stores had one that could take a 14mm axle, and ordering is a major PITA for me..
I got to thinking that I could just go to home depot (or my shed!) and figure something out, I mean all we're trying to do is anchor that axle in the dropout, independent of its axle-nuts. Maybe figure out the *exact* distance between axle and bottom of dropout and then cut-to-fit a chunk of hard plastic resins? Insert that block to prop the axle so it cannot go any deeper into a dropout?
Or maybe checkout the hardware section, there must be some kind of combo in there that can be rigged up effectively into something like this:
https://www.danscomp.com/products-PARTS/440063/Steel_Adjuster.html

If I had my old ADD meds and half an hour at home depot I bet I could figure out something effective. Ugly, but effective.

Any recommendations for something I could setup real easy and have in/on/around my dropuouts tomorrow?

//have already been thinking how much it'd be to have a thin, 1/2" long bolt-hole affixed right beside the dropouts, so you can adjust a bolt a la garrett's fiend frame

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9/13/2015 7:25 PM

Male or female axle?

On my female 14mm axles, when I put the hub guard on, there wasn't much axle left stick in the dropout...I didn't want all the pressure going on just a sliver of the axle, so my solution was a 3/8x24 jam nut. Had to grind it a bit thinner to be the same width as the dropout and monkey with threading it on the bolt and the bolt in the axle at the same time.... But it fits real nice and fills the dropout completely now. The nut itself was a perfect fit, height-wise, to fill the dropout vertically, and there isn't a ton of room to the front left over for the axle to slide.

I'll try to grab a pic for you tomorrow.

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9/14/2015 7:34 AM

Here's some pics of what I explained above....you can see the sliver of the 14mm female axle between the silver jam nut and the hub guard.
[LINK TO IMAGE]

[LINK TO IMAGE]


And here you can see how it closed up the space in front of my axle....I got lucky with my chain length. But, I'll probably have to take the drive side bolt and the jam nut off in order to get my chain over the sprocket if I need to take the wheel off to change a flat or anything.
[LINK TO IMAGE]



If you do this, make sure you are getting a JAM nut, they are thinner than a regular nut and you won't have to spend but about 15 seconds grinding them down to fit.

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9/17/2015 1:34 PM

Am confused by that, it looks like your dropouts are wayy bigger than the axle - that must be the 'female' setup? I'll need to look at mine, I think it's just straight 14mm axle, although I've two bikes maybe one has something different.. worst case scenario, I could just measure distance from beginning of dropout to axle, and cut a chunk of wood to fit there lol, would be ghetto but it'd do the job I'm sure!

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9/17/2015 1:55 PM

adfkje wrote:

Am confused by that, it looks like your dropouts are wayy bigger than the axle - that must be the 'female' setup? I'll need to ...more

Yep, my axles are females. On male axles, the axle has to be all the way through the dropouts so that you can get a bolt on there.

This is my first set of female axles, so I'm not sure why they are so short, but they are and that's how I solved the problem. I had to put one thin spacer behind the hub guard to prevent it from hitting the spokes, but that was thinner than a regular washer...so the axle would be too short either way.



If you put something in front of your axles, just make sure it can's fall out.... Like on mine, it would be sandwiched in there between the peg and hub guard.

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9/17/2015 2:24 PM

[LINK TO IMAGE]

that's Simple's Wheel Slammer. i think tree bought their inventory and is selling it on their webstore right now. you measure the space between your axle and dropout and get the corresponding washer to fill that space. i don't see why you couldn't replicate this idea with a thick washer or something.

however, i think there is another issue here. you shouldn't have any problems keeping your hub tight in your dropouts
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9/18/2015 5:39 AM

Dude those spacers there (or some home depot 'equivalent') are exactly what I'm thinking! And the problem is resolved now, hasn't moved since I overhauled the nuts/axle and sanded the dropouts, but I'm still angling to make it more secure than simply relying on the bite between axle::dropout (it was just yesterday that I snapped a crank-arm pinch-bolt while landing, due to it being overtightened, and have stripped nuts on this rear axle before - so although it's fine now, I'm sure those nuts are probably torqued past spec and I'd rather have something mechanically helping that axle stay put in addition to the nut::dropout. I do things that nail my rear tire against the ground in bad ways more often than I should, so this is a bigger concern for me haha)

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9/18/2015 6:16 AM

$10 and probably next to nothing for shipping.

That's a deal that I'd take in your shoes.
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9/20/2015 9:02 AM

gg check it out now, thnx man (you're always such a help!!)

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9/22/2015 9:22 AM

adfkje wrote:

gg check it out now, thnx man (you're always such a help!!)

Was there supposed to be an image?

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9/25/2015 6:47 AM

of what? am confuse

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9/25/2015 7:29 AM

adfkje wrote:

of what? am confuse

You said "check it out now".... Just wasn't sure if there was a pic I was supposed to look at.

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