Computer Science Nerds

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12/20/2017 11:48 AM

Anyone else here majoring/majored in CS or anything related?

I switched from Mechanical Engineering to CS 2 years ago and never looked back. I'm currently getting my AAS in Software Development, then I'll be going to OSU for Computer Science and Engineering.

Let's have a thread for this cool ass shit.

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12/21/2017 7:44 AM

No

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3/25/2018 8:17 PM

What do they start you out with in college? Currently doing AP computer science in highschool, going to College for it soon. Right now it's just JavaScript for me

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3/25/2018 8:47 PM

biggybuggy wrote:

What do they start you out with in college? Currently doing AP computer science in highschool, going to College for it soon. Right now it's just JavaScript for me

First, it's great you're getting into it in high school. It took me until I was 20 to figure out I wanted to do it so I feel really late haha. JavaScript is a definitely a great place to start, it's super popular.

I'm finishing up at a community college right now, first thing we learned was Java. I took Java II as well and that covered multithreading and networking and databases and bigger applications which was fun. Had to take a shitty HTML/CSS class around then as well. Then you have to take a shit ton of repetitive language courses that just cover what you already learned in Java. C#, Javascript, and SQL which you learned in Java II. Community college is honestly shit for CS, it doesn't teach you anything actually useful besides syntax so you basically need to get lucky and get the rare great professor. I've learned way more on my own, my curriculum doesn't even have data structures and algorithms.

I'm transferring to OSU next year which starts with Java and some foundations classes like DS&A and then moves on to C and Assembly and it's more theoretical from there.

Where are you going to school at? CS is definitely one of the best fields to get into right now, a BS in CS is basically guaranteed financial comfort.

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YOU AVIN A LAUGH M8?
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3/25/2018 9:17 PM

Xxohioanxx wrote:

First, it's great you're getting into it in high school. It took me until I was 20 to figure out I wanted to do it so I feel really late haha. JavaScript is a definitely a great place to start, it's super popular.

I'm finishing up at a community college right now, first thing we learned was Java. I took Java II as well and that covered multithreading and networking and databases and bigger applications which was fun. Had to take a shitty HTML/CSS class around then as well. Then you have to take a shit ton of repetitive language courses that just cover what you already learned in Java. C#, Javascript, and SQL which you learned in Java II. Community college is honestly shit for CS, it doesn't teach you anything actually useful besides syntax so you basically need to get lucky and get the rare great professor. I've learned way more on my own, my curriculum doesn't even have data structures and algorithms.

I'm transferring to OSU next year which starts with Java and some foundations classes like DS&A and then moves on to C and Assembly and it's more theoretical from there.

Where are you going to school at? CS is definitely one of the best fields to get into right now, a BS in CS is basically guaranteed financial comfort.

I'm going to the University of Nevada Reno, or just Nevada as the country calls us now. The program there is supposedly great, with jobs in the area taking graduates right as they finish school.

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3/26/2018 11:47 AM

biggybuggy wrote:

I'm going to the University of Nevada Reno, or just Nevada as the country calls us now. The program there is supposedly great, with jobs in the area taking graduates right as they finish school.

Sounds like a good deal. Definitely spend time learning and doing projects outside of class. Doing independent projects not only is the best way to learn, but it'll also give you something to put on your Github to show potential employers. You probably won't learn a few of the skills you need in class. You need to learn the command line, Git, maybe a bit of networking, and databases if your program doesn't cover it well. If your college has the hookup with jobs, you won't need to worry much but it's always good to stay ahead. Getting a position at a big tech company sets you up for life.

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YOU AVIN A LAUGH M8?
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The Trailest Bike On Vital

3/26/2018 9:51 PM

Xxohioanxx wrote:

First, it's great you're getting into it in high school. It took me until I was 20 to figure out I wanted to do it so I feel really late haha. JavaScript is a definitely a great place to start, it's super popular.

I'm finishing up at a community college right now, first thing we learned was Java. I took Java II as well and that covered multithreading and networking and databases and bigger applications which was fun. Had to take a shitty HTML/CSS class around then as well. Then you have to take a shit ton of repetitive language courses that just cover what you already learned in Java. C#, Javascript, and SQL which you learned in Java II. Community college is honestly shit for CS, it doesn't teach you anything actually useful besides syntax so you basically need to get lucky and get the rare great professor. I've learned way more on my own, my curriculum doesn't even have data structures and algorithms.

I'm transferring to OSU next year which starts with Java and some foundations classes like DS&A and then moves on to C and Assembly and it's more theoretical from there.

Where are you going to school at? CS is definitely one of the best fields to get into right now, a BS in CS is basically guaranteed financial comfort.

biggybuggy wrote:

I'm going to the University of Nevada Reno, or just Nevada as the country calls us now. The program there is supposedly great, with jobs in the area taking graduates right as they finish school.

Xxohioanxx wrote:

Sounds like a good deal. Definitely spend time learning and doing projects outside of class. Doing independent projects not only is the best way to learn, but it'll also give you something to put on your Github to show potential employers. You probably won't learn a few of the skills you need in class. You need to learn the command line, Git, maybe a bit of networking, and databases if your program doesn't cover it well. If your college has the hookup with jobs, you won't need to worry much but it's always good to stay ahead. Getting a position at a big tech company sets you up for life.

We have the tesla hookup here, but I'm a lil wary on the future of the company. I managed to land an interview for an internship there in April so hopefully I can get started early into this stuff

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4/23/2018 5:53 PM

How has the field treated you ohio do you still enjoy it? Im thinking about making the commitment to study CS but I keep feeling as if it will be something in where I hate the physical process of sitting down on the computer in the first place therefore would not enjoy doing it for a living.

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5/3/2018 7:34 AM

HNOE12 wrote:

How has the field treated you ohio do you still enjoy it? Im thinking about making the commitment to study CS but I keep feeling as if it will be something in where I hate the physical process of sitting down on the computer in the first place therefore would not enjoy doing it for a living.

If you hate sitting down and working at a computer, obviously you wouldn't enjoy CS too much. But if you really enjoy solving problems, whether those are logical or design problems, you won't even notice the fact that you're sitting down. Plus, most CS jobs are way more than just sitting in a cubicle writing code all day. There's a lot more behind the entire development process that can be enjoyable. But if you're just doing it for the money, you'll hate it. It's common to start at $60-100k depending on location, but if you hate the work you won't be able to do it long. It's just as strenuous as jobs involving physical labor, just in a different way.

My recommendation is to start going through the CS50 course I linked below and see how you feel.

https://www.edx.org/course/cs50s-introduction-computer-science-harvardx-cs50x

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YOU AVIN A LAUGH M8?
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5/3/2018 8:36 AM

Thanks for the link man much appreciated! Ive been looking at courses on codeacademy and treehouse recently too but the courses seem very web design based and theres so many languages its hard to know where to start so your reply helps a lot!

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5/3/2018 9:29 AM

HNOE12 wrote:

Thanks for the link man much appreciated! Ive been looking at courses on codeacademy and treehouse recently too but the courses seem very web design based and theres so many languages its hard to know where to start so your reply helps a lot!

Yeah, Codecademy and Treehouse aren't great resources for beginners in my opinion. They only really teach the syntax, so you'll never understand what you're actually doing if those are your only resources. It's like learning grammar without knowing what any words mean. CS50 teaches actual computer science, rather than just programming. It starts off with C, which is probably the hardest language to really learn, but it's very useful to introduce some of the fundamentals of computer science. Then it moves on to Python and JavaScript, which are much more useful in today's world. It also touches on databases and SQL, which everyone needs to know the basics of.

I actually first learned Java at my community college. If you finish CS50, I would highly recommend taking a free online Object-Oriented Java class linked below. Not only is Java a good language to know, but this class also introduces you to a huge amount of ideas that you'll need to understand to be successful. It can be a pain to setup your tools to do the coursework, but it's worth the effort. You'll learn by building actual programs in an actual development environment rather than on a website.

http://mooc.fi/courses/2013/programming-part-1/

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YOU AVIN A LAUGH M8?
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The Trailest Bike On Vital

5/3/2018 12:23 PM

Xxohioanxx wrote:

Yeah, Codecademy and Treehouse aren't great resources for beginners in my opinion. They only really teach the syntax, so you'll never understand what you're actually doing if those are your only resources. It's like learning grammar without knowing what any words mean. CS50 teaches actual computer science, rather than just programming. It starts off with C, which is probably the hardest language to really learn, but it's very useful to introduce some of the fundamentals of computer science. Then it moves on to Python and JavaScript, which are much more useful in today's world. It also touches on databases and SQL, which everyone needs to know the basics of.

I actually first learned Java at my community college. If you finish CS50, I would highly recommend taking a free online Object-Oriented Java class linked below. Not only is Java a good language to know, but this class also introduces you to a huge amount of ideas that you'll need to understand to be successful. It can be a pain to setup your tools to do the coursework, but it's worth the effort. You'll learn by building actual programs in an actual development environment rather than on a website.

http://mooc.fi/courses/2013/programming-part-1/

That really is how it feels couldn't be more right about that, as a complete beginner I had a lot of questions that were unanswered so I just went with what the steps told me to do without really learning why. I will definitely check out the material you linked once I'm off work, thank you!

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